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November 23, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"One of the most exciting
films you'll see this year."
Det. News
"IF YOU LOVE TO BE SCARED,
MAKE IT A POINT TO SEE
'PLAY MISTY FOR ME'!"
Owen Eshenroder, Ann Arbor News
C L HT EA STOmWOOD

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan Tuesday, November 23, 1971

By The Associated Press
SOUTH VIETNAM'S new offensive designed to smash the
headquarters of three North Vietnamese divisions in Eastern
Cambodia encountered only light resistance yesterday.
U.S. advisers warned that if South Vietnam is to survive as
American forces dwindle, its troops will have to conduct frequent
offensive operations into eastern Cambodia to keep the North Viet-
namese back.
ISRAELI TROOPS were reported ready for any eventuality
along the Suez Canal front yesterday following weekend war
talk by President Anwar Sadat of Egypt.
Sadat said "Egypt's decision is to fight."
The United States, meanwhile has stopped its efforts to per-
suade Egypt and Israel to reopen the Suez Canal, according to State
Department sources.
After careful study of Sadat's speech, the decision was reached
that there is no point for the time being to press further the Suez
issue, the sources said.

BACK PAY POSSIBLE

Govt.

reviews

wag

"PLAY MISTY FOR ME" J
You cannot afford to be apathetic!
Important issues concerning your economic and !
academic welfare are now being debated by the
policy-makers:
* changes in status and benefits for teaching
fellows and research assistants
* implementation of candidacy fees
" measures to alleviate the current tightness in
the job market
Candidates to file for positions in the Rackham Stu-
dent Government are now being sought:
" executive council members (ten seats)
* chairman, vice-chairman, Rackham Assembly
TO OBTAIN APPLICATION FORMS
INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD WRITE:
ELECTION DIRECTOR, RSG, 2006 Rackham Bldg.
The filing deadline is 5 P.M., Monday, November 29
THESE ARE REAL ISSUES AND YOU CAN
MAKE YOUR INFLUENCE FELT

0
eIssue
WASHINGTON (M - The
administration might accept
some provision in pending
Phase 2 legislation for retro-
active payment of wage in-
creases blocked by the freeze,
provided that standards of
the Pay Board are preserved.
Retroactivity is labor's major
demand and the chief cause
of AFL-CIO's disaffection.
According to Secretary of the
Treasury John Connally, a Senate
amendment to control legislation
would authorize retroactive pay-
ments that were consistent -with
the board's policies and criteria..
This "might be acceptable in the
final analysis, if we can get lan-
guage of that kind," he said.
Connallycalso declared that the
AFL-CIO could damage the anti-
inflation effort by refusal to co-
?ress operate and accused its president,
George Meany, of boorish and ar-
rogant behavior toward President
Nixon.
In addition Connally deplored
the Pay Board's approval< of a
coal industry settlement giving
miners a 15 per cent first-year
wage boost, saying he hopes it
would not become a precedent.
"I was disappointed with the de-
cision," said Connally, who is
chairman of the Cost of Living
mpaign Council and Nixon's chief eco-
adopt- nomic spokesman.
of the It seemed certain, however, that
break events of the first week of Phase
2 had widened the breach between
n fed- the administration and organized
ans. labor.

BLACK MEMBERS of the House of Representatives an-
nounced yesterday they are organizing a national black political
convention.
The convention call climaxed two days of open workshops and
closed strategy sessions for about 200 black elected officials and
political activists.I
FIDEL CASTRO said yesterday Cuba will eventually get the
U.S. Navy out of Guantanomo, perhaps without firing a shot.s
"There is a new state of consciousness in the world. Things are
changing. Some day Cuba will get Guantanomo back from the
United States", the Cuban prime minister told students at the State
Technical University at Punta Arenas, Chile.
Castro has been in Chile for nearly two weeks as the guest of his
friend and fellow Marxist, President Salvador Allende.
OVER 2,000 MARXIST and ANTI-MARXIST STUDENTS at
the University of Chile battled yesterday in a month-long conflict
involving internal politics at the university.
Marxist professors and students who have a majority on the uni-
versity governing board, want to restructure the present 12 schools by
combining some of them. The anti-Marxists say the Marxists want
to make the autonomous university politically subservient to Chile's
leftist government.
Scores of students and bystanders were struck by rocks and
half a dozen were taken to hospitals with serious injuries.

-Associated F
TREASURY SECRETARY John Connally holds a Washington news conference yesterday.
$27 BILLION:
Senate passes tax cut bill wii
3campaign funds amend meal

WASHINGTON (P) - The Senate
passed a $27 billion tax-cut bill af-
ter adding a controverisal provi-
sion to finance presidential cam-
paigns with tax funds.
The plan, adopted 64-30, was bit-
terly opposed by Republicans, as
it would provide $20.4 million in
taxpayer funds to both the Demo-
cratic and Republican nominees inI
1972 and $6.3 million to Alabama
Gov. George Wallace if he runs
again.
Ignoring hints of a Nixon veto

I

of the entire tax package, the
Democrats closed ranks almost
solidly to adopt the campaign fi-
nancing amendment sponsored by
Sen. John Pastore (D-R.I.).
If the plan is kept in the final
version of the tax bill sent to the
White House, as expected, the
President will face a tough de-
cision.
If he vetos the bill, he could
delay the economic benefits of the
tax-cutting provisions indefinite-
ly.
If he signs it, he may give sub-
stantial campaign funds to his
Democratic opponents and to Wal-
lace who could take Southern
states from the GOP next No-
vember.
Republicans made clear in the
debate that their party would not
use the federal funds next year.
AV

DENIAL FROM INDIA
Pakistan claims invasion

Before voting on the can
financing plan, the Senate
ed 82-17 another partc
Pastore plan to give a tax
on political contributions i
eral, state and local electi

LAST TIMES TON ITE !
BY THE DIRECTOR OF
"MIDNIGHT COWBOY"
"A BI-SEXUAL TRIANGLE"
-VAR I ETY
Joseph Janni production of John Schlesinger's Film
qBo y Sunday"

Last GRAD
COFFEE HOUR
beforeN Thaksgiving
Tues. Nov. 23, 4-6 p.m
4th floor Rackham
Come, meet new
friends, and have
cider and doughnuts.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday,
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.
SEE OUR AD IN THE
JOURNAL of ACCOUNTANCY
Becker CPA Review Course
' 313-961-1400

RAWALPINDI, Pakistan (/)-
Pakistan radio accused India
yesterday of launching an "all-
out offensive" in East Pakistan
without declaring war and said
that Indian forces were pene-
trating Pakistan defenses.
The radio account claimed 130
Indians were killed and perhaps
500 wounded infighting around
Jessore on the western border
with Indian West Bengal. Paki-
stan casualties were put at sev-
en killed and 40 wounded.
Radio monitors in Lndon
quoted the Pakistani broadcast
as saying the Indian army had

"been able to make some gains
across the border because no one
expected they would throw all
conventions to the winds" by at-
tacking without declaring war.
The same broadcast reported
President Agha Mohammed
Yahya Khan visited troops near
the West Pakistani border with
India and Kashmir and vowed
that Pakistan will "crush the
aggressor."
The monitors in London said
they had picked up another re-
port from India, however, saying
India had denied the offensive
had taken place.

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THE ALLEY CINEMA
330 MAYNARD
TONIGHT ONLY-TUESDAY, NOV. 23

.tMing
GlendaJackson Peter Finch

O P.-PTH rorUM
FIFTM AVENUE AT LIERY
DOWN'TOW.N ANN ARBOR
LLJINFORMIATION 761-8700

SHOWN
7&9

STARTING WEDNESDAY!
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE
"ONE OF THE BEST AMERICAN
FILMS FOR MONTH"
-The New Yorker Magazine

i
I
,
E

ORDERS TO KIL L
dir. ANTHONY ASQUITH, British, 1958. With PAUL
MASSIE, LILLIAN GISH, IRENE WORTH and LIONEL JEFFRIES
WINNER OF BRITISH ACADEMY AWARDS 1959
BEST SCREENPLAY BEST ACTRESS (Irene Worth)
* An American bomber pilot in England is specifically trained to kill an under-
ground agent in* France. When he accomplishes h is distasteful mission, he dis-
covers he may have killed the wrong man.
* "This important British Film MAKES A S T R 0 N G, ALMOST UNEQUIVOCAL
MORAL COMMENT ON THE EFFECTS OF W A R ON T H E INDIVIDUAL CON-
SCIENCE, and it is these far-reaching implications which give it its main strength
.. "/-Monthly Film Bulletin
o "Paul Massie, a young Canadian actor, plays the lead with just the right com-
bination of sincerity, innocence, horror and despair . . . the execution of his mis-
sion, after he meets his gentle kindly victim, is done with frightening suspense
. ."-COMMONWEAL
SHOWS AT 7 & 9:30 $1.00
COMING MON., NOV. 29-Resnais' LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD

ELECTION INFORMATION
Prepared by the Ann Arbor League of Women Voters
SPECIAL SCHOOL ELECTION
TUES., NOV. 30, 1971
A Bonding Proposition will be the
only thing on the Ballot
The Washtenaw Intermediate School District (WISD) Board
Education is asking voters for permission to issue $2,700,000
bonds.

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of
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PURPOSE: To build and equip a central facility to house programs for
mentally retarded and multiply handicapped children. The programs
are in operation now, but the rented buldings in which they are con-
/ ducted are distant from each other and are not designed for their
function.
COST: .19 mills for 12 years.
This means $.19 per $1000 of assessed property valuation (50% of
market value) beginning in 1972 for 12 years when the bonds will
be paid off.
EXAMPLE: Home assessed at $10,000, additional $1 .90 per year beginning
in 1972.
PRESENT ANNUAL TAX being levied by WISD:
1.3 mills or $1.30 per thousand.
If your home is assessed at $10,000 you are now paying $13.00 per
year. This includes $1.80 (.18 mills) toward retirement of bonds
issued in 1967 which will be paid off in 1973.

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ALSO STARRING
KENNETH MARS SADA THOMPSON JACK SOMACK.
ANDFROM THE NOVEL BY cO-PROUCER
GERALD D'[DL GHFN AMTEEL BY COPRODUCER
"CHARII " PAULIA FOX PAULI LEAF

TOTAL TAX NOW: $1.30 per thousand.
TOTAL TAX IF BOND PROPOSAL PASSES:
$1.49 per thousand through 1973.
$1.31 per thousand after 1973.
The Washtenow Intermediate School District includes the Ann Arbor School

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