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November 19, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-19

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 19, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, November 19, 1971

5% RAISE:
State board suggests
pay hike for workers

Two students caught
in term paper fraud

'U' janitors' case on
lunch period rejected

REDUCED AIRFARES
Fly with a Reservation at
CHRISTMAS ON AMERICAN AIRLINES TO

From Wire Service Reports
A recommendation calling for
a general- five per cent pay raise
for the state's 47,000 classified
civil service workers effective
July 1, was received yesterday
by the Michigan Civil Service
Commission.
The $32.2 million wage and
fringe benefits package was pro-
posed to the commission by its
nine-member Compensation Ad-
visory Board.
Included in the package is a
general five per cent pay raise
to cost $24.4 million annually,
an 11 per cent wage boost for
State Police troopers to cost $1.2
million and new fringe bene-
fits to cost an extra $6.3 million
annually.
The pay recommendations,
which were approved before the
federal Pay Board announced
its 5.5 per cent annual limita-
tion on wage increases, were
transmitted to principal state
departments and employe or-
ganizations for review.
The next step for the pay
proposal is review and approval
by the four-man Civil Service
Commission. The. commission
has scheduled a public hearing
on the proposal for Nov. 30 in
Lansing. The commission said
it expects to make a final de-

cision sometime in early De-
cember.
Last year the commission ap-
proved pay increases averaging
8.4 per cent for state workers
which cost the state $35.5 mil-
lion plus $700,000 in fringe
benefits. The study committee
had recommended a 9.8 per cent
increase which would have cost
$42.8 million,
The raises, which were due
last July, were held up and paid
retroactively last September as
the Legislature was involved in
a spending dispute over the en-
tire state budget.
The major fringe benefit
recommended to the commission
this year would allow a state
worker to claim a percentage of
accumulated sick leave upon
leaving employment for any
reason.
The leave would be claimed
on a scale beginning with 5 per-
cent for employes with six years
service up to 100 per cent for
employes with 27 years of ser-
vice.
Also recommended was an ad-
ditional paid holiday and a 5
per cent increase in longevity
pay for all employes with six
continuous years of service or
more.

(Continued from page 1)
submitted to complete expulsion
from the University."
Contacted yesterday about the
incident, Harger expressed sur-
prise. "I don't know how it could
happen," he said. "Our system is
fail-safe."
Harger said it was impossible for
him to immediately confirm or
deny the students' charges that
Write-On sold them both papers.
"We underwent a management
change Nov. 1," Harger said, "and
when the previous manager, who
was in charge during the period
in question, left, he took with him
some records and papers belonging
to Write-On."
According to Harger, John Ste-
vens, the former manager, was
conducting a separate business
within Write-On's structure and
when he left the organization to
form Creative Research Inc.-an
Ann Arbor "custom written" pa-
per supplier similar to Write-On-
the records were in utter confu-
sion.
"We do our best," Harger add-
ed, "but something can always
happen.''
In an interview with The Daily,
one of the two students involved-
a University sophomore who pre-
ferred to remain unidentified-said
she was "enraged."
"I couldn't believe this would
happen in a thousand years," she
said. "I asked the Write-On rep-
resentative about the chances of
being discovered and he said there
U.S. builds
ease agains
B errigan

was no way. If I can sue them
I'll do it."
A similar incident occurred last
spring at Harvard University, ac-
cording to the Harvard Crimson,
the university's student newspaper.
In its May 20 issue, the Crimson
reported that two students sub-
mitted to the same course identi-
cal papers purchased from -a
Cambridge-based firm called Term
Papers Unlimited.
According to the Crimson, one.of
the two involved, a graduate stu-
dent, was suspended from the uni-
versity for one year, and the other,
an undergraduate, was expelled.
Literary college teachers and
administrators aware of the case
have declined to make the names
of the two students public pending
any disciplinary action.
One of the two students, how-
ever, contacted The Daily yester-
day and explained that she had
purchased the paper because "per-
sonal problems" prevented her
from doing it herself, and she felt
that "one time was not going to
hurt."
"But reflecting about that de-
cision," she continued, "I admit
that it was not entirely ethical."
Nissen says he sees broad im-
plications upon the University's
academic system if the practice of
buying term papers becomes a ma-
jor problem.
"This basically unethical prac-
tice undermines a legitimate av-
enue for the presentation and or-
ganization of ideas," Nissen says.
"The term paper is basically a
better avenue to test the student's
mental abilities than something
like objective tests," Nissen con-
tinues, "for they give the student
a chance to think and reason."
"But if the abuse continues,"
Nissen adds, "the general agree-
ment among professors seems to
be that other, perhaps more unde-
sirable, ways of grading courses
will have to be found."

(Continued from page 1)
and was not engaging in certain
unfair labor practices." MERC,
in full session this week upheld
Bixler's conclusions.
In addition MERC called for
dismissal on the basis that the
case could have been settled
through arbitration, rather than
through the board.
The commission upheld Uni-
versity positions citing that the
University was clearly given the
authority to change the work
periods through a contract pro-
vision which reads: "Lunch per-
iods shall be scheduled as to
time and duration by the Uni-
versity."
The union had filed objections
to the University's move con-
tending that since the contract
did not "provide a procedure
u n d e r which, the lunch hour
could be changed, it became a
mandatory subject of bargain-
ing."
T h e commission responded,
however, that both parties had

negotiated the lunch period
clause contemplating changes
and "essentially the same clause
was repeated in the current con-
tract as had been in the earlier
one." The board concluded from
this that both parties had "con-
sciously realized the scope" of
the clause and therefore, the
University had not violated it.
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Read Dail

Y

Classifieds

..:..
44 4.'~4 *1 ~ {

A

Speakers debate faculty
research plan at forum

(Continued from page 1)
that full time researchers at Wil-
low Run are unsure of their future.
"These people feel they are un-
der attack from Senate Assembly
regarding their jobs and sectirity,"
he told the listeners.
Rev. Bart Beaven addressed the
forum as a representative of a
group of local clergy. He read a
Regents meet
with SACUA'
on research
(Continued from page 1)
states that "any financial bur-
den that results from a change
in classified research policy be
borne generally by the University
community." Fleming's statement
had suggested a timed phase-out
of research ( if the proposal were
to be passed.
"We explained that this is not
an unprecedented case," Norman
said. "We've had programs phased
out before."
Other topics discussed at the
meeting included the possibility of
inserting a phrase into the policy
suspending it during national
emergencies, and extending the
policy to include all classified re-
search, not just federal contracts.
However, sources say the Re-
gents "did not broach" the sub-
ject of the review committee's
composition, which is set up to in-
elude both opponents and pro-
ponents of classified research.
Later, Regents said they felt
too unfamiliar with the issue to
comment on it.

statement issued by over 30 local
clergymen denouncing classified
research.
In the statement the clergymen
said, "We believe secret military
research to be unappropriate for
almost any institution," but espe-
cially as for a university com-
munity. The statement went on to
support Assembly's proposal.
Rev. Beaven urged "an alid to
applying this technology to cause
death, suffering, and fear."
Engineering Prof. William
Brown, director of the Willow Run
Labs, called for the continuation of
research. He cited the country's
current military involvement as
justification for the continuation of
military research, saying, "It only
makes sense to cease classified
research if Congress enacts im-
mediate unilateral disarmament."
He said the major fault with the
Assembly proposal was that the
"problems to be resolved by the
act have not yet been clearly de-
fined."
Michael Knox, Grad, controver-
sial former student member of the
Classified R e s e a r c h CommitteeI
who revealed its activities to the
University community, said he
was "shocked to learn of the Uni-
versity's involvement inĀ° war re-
search." He said he supported the
Assembly- proposal.

t
5
f

HARRISBURG, Pa (P)-The U.S.
government indicated yesterday it
had a second informant in its case
against the Rev. Philip Berrigan
and seven other antiwar activists
charged, among other things, with
conspiring to kidnap presidential
adviser Henry Kissinger.
The disclosure came when the
government filed a motion for a
court order allowing it to withhold
unidentified documents from the
defense.
In an affidavit accompanying the
motion, U.S. Attorney William
Connelly said the informant "be-
lieves he would be harassed and
intimidated and urged to repudi-
ate the factual evidence given by
him to the government" if his
name is revealed.

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