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November 18, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ni
RC Players
SHAW: OVERRULED
ANOUILH: CECILE
75c
East Quad Aud. Thurs.-Sat.
8:00 P.M. Nov. 18-20

page three

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Sfr "i!3an

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

-., ...-

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, November 18, 1971

MILITARY PROCUREMENT BILL

Nixon

rejects

Viet

withdrawal

date

. 4-m=

"One of the most exciting
films you'll see this year."
Detroit News

CLINT EASTWOOD
Shows at
lop 1,3,5,
"PLAY MISTY FOR ME" 7, 9:05 P.M.
...an Invitailon to terror...
A UNVEASAL-MAtPASO COMPANY PICTURE.TECHNICOLOR X c

briefs
I~ v
By The Associated Press
IN REPLY to a student protest Monday at Wayne State,
The Internal Revenue Service directed George Gullen Jr., acting
school president, to remove the 20 per cent tuition increase be-
cause it violated Phase 2 of the federal price-control regulations.
Gullen said the university would revert to its old tuition rates
immediately but expressed concern that the decision had been made
before the university presented its case.
Gullen later requested that the. State of Michigan give Wayne
State another $3.5 million to compensate for the loss of tuition in-
creases. He also asked that the school be exempt from the three
per cent cutback which would bring about $1.5 million for the
school.
RIOT POLICE IN SANTIAGO, CHILE, used tear gas yes-
terday to disperse 100 students who had assembled to protest a
takeover of the University of Chile's main building by leftist stu-
dents.
The conflict is the result of nationwide efforts by Communists
and Socialists, the bulwarks of Chile's leftist government, to gain
control of labor, the legislature, basic industries and education.
FIGHTING ERUPTED 10 miles from downtown Pnom Penh
yesterday as Cambodian troops rammed into the first line of ene-
my defenses.
An offensive by Cambodian troops began in the northeast yes-
terday with air strikes, shelling, and infantry probes, a Cambodian
high command spokesman reported.
U. S. Cobra helicopter gunships also went into action on the
front yesterday for the second day in a row, bombing North Vietna-
mese and Viet Cong positions on a treeline north of Highway 4, the
road to the sea.
TWO PRISON INMATES crashed through heavy wire gates
in a homemade tank and escaped, Superintendent Lawrence Dug-
ger said yesterday.
He said Roy Gyger, 26, and Wallace McDonald, 43, manufac-
tured the tank in the Raiford State Prison furniture factory where
both were employed.
Gyger and McDonald were pursued by guards and dogs but
away and remain at large.
C SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MELVIN LAIRD yesterday de-
nied the existence of discriminatory quotas in assigning black
troops to overseas American bases.

WASHINGTON 0 - Accusing Congress of hindering his
search for a negotiated settlement, President Nixon signed
yesterday a $21.3-billion military-procurement bill but
brushed aside a provision calling for a deadline for U.S.
withdrawal from Indochina.
The procurement bill authorizes $871.4 million less than
sought by the Pentagon. Actual appropriations must be voted
later.
Even as Nixon declared he would not be bound by the
procurement bill's withdrawal clause, the House headed for
a vote on a move by Rep. Edward Boland (D-Mass.) to cut
3ff all U.S. war money next'
June 1.
Nixon strongly opposes the Bo-
land amendment, just as he
fought the amendment sponsor-
ed by Senate Democratic Leader
Mike Mansfield of Montana which agencies no
Wklb Lnl nn01 th lA rement

SPEAKING AT A NEWS CONFERENCE yesterday, the Rev.
Jesse Jackson, national director of the Southern Christian Lead-
ership Conference, opposed President Nixon's program to halt
inflation. Jackson hopes to address the AFL-CIO labor conven-
tion which opens tomorrow appealing for help for the poor.
s "
Commission passes
price 'hike for autos

was tac ed on to ie prucuiein
bill.
The Mansfield amendment "is
without binding force or effect,"
Nixon said, "and it does not re-
flect my judgment about the way,
in which the war should be
brought to a conclusion."
The amendment Nixon said he'
would ignore was a weakened
version of one passed earlier by
the Senate calling for total with-
drawal within six months. After
the House rejected that language,;
a compromise was passed which
"urges and requests" Nixon to;
withdraw all troops "at a date'
certain" subject to release of U.S.
war prisoners and an accounting
for the missing in action.
Nixon said that he will not
change "the policies I have pur-
sued and shall continue to pursue"
in Indochina.
Nixon reiterated that until a
full settlement occurs the rate of
withdrawal of U.S. forces will be
determined by "the level of enemy
activity, the progress of Vietna-
mization, and by the progress to-
wards obtaining the release of all
American prisoners and a cease-
fire for all of Southwest Asia,."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
tgan, 420 Maynard street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

lacking funds
WASHINGTON (A) - America's
defense, foreign aid and antipov-
erty programs remained without
funds legally yesterday after en-
countering a new snag in Con-
gress, but leaders worked to get
the programs back in business by
nightfall.
House leaders set in motion
rare machinery to send the cham-
ber's original $3.4-billion foreign
aid bill straight to a House-Senate
conference today.
The Senate voted interim spend-
ing authority yesterday to keep
the nearly $80 billion worth of
programs alive until Dec. 1. Two
House members, however, forced
the continuing resolution into a
House-Senate compromise confer-
ence, delaying final action.
Although their legal spending
authority expired Monday night,
the Pentagon, foreign aid and
antipoverty agencies continued
business as usual with the confi-
dence Congress would renew at
last interim funds.
"There's a problem of pas-
sage," said Speaker Carl Albert.
House leaders tried to win unani-
mous consent approval of the Sen-
ate's Dec. 1 interim funding ex-
tension last night to immediately
take the' agencies out of legal
limbo.
Reps. Durward Hall, (R-Mo.),
and Wayne Hays (D-Ohio), ob-
jected and forced a voice vote on
sending it to a House-Senate con-
ference, which the House over-
whelmingly approvi.!d.

TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR

"JOHN SCHLESINGER'S 'SUNDAY, BLOODY SUN-
DAY' is a film of such sublety, such perception and
such maturity that it makes all other films-even
the best of them--that pretend to deal with the way
we live in 'adult' terms seem adolescent and super- .
ficial. It is not only a furthering of the creative
skills of the director of 'Darling' and 'Midnight
Cowboy' and therefore a fascinatingly beautiful film
in technique and performance, it is also a multi-
leveled consideration of the love we live by, the set-
tlements we make to continue that living, the inno-
cent destroyers the generations bring upon us. Con-
ceived by Schlesinger, with a screenplay by Penelope
Gilliat, the film critic whose writings are marked by
delicacy of feeling, its very contemporary story of
triangular love is ultimately brought to searingly
compassionate universal terms. It is that rare film
that illuminates the deeper corners of the heart,
that probes beyond the obvious concepts, that ex-
pands our undersanding."
-Judith Crist, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
A Joseph Janni Pwto,.Rnt John Schlesinger's Film
Bloody Sunday"
Mtarring
Glenda Jackson RterFinch
MurrayHead
0 FIFTH Forum]THURS. 7 & 9
VWTH JUIUFRAT.LI7BRTY9
DOWNTOWN ANN ARROR F RI f 9 "1
UIINFORMATION 761-970RI7*

WASHINGTON (A) -The
Price Commission approved yes-
terday a request by American
Motors Corps. to raise prices by
2.5 per cent on 1972 model au-
tomobiles.
The commission held that
American Motors meets the gen-
eral price guidelines it laid down
last week.
Manufacturers may boost pri-
ces to offset increased costs, as
long as the company's profit
margin is not enlarged over two
of the last three years in which

day halted construction work-
ers scheduled pay increases un-
til further notice. This means
that while other workers have
already begun collecting pay
raises held up by the wage
freeze, the construction indus-
try continues under a mini-
freeze of its own.
Meanwhile, yesterday t o p
AFL-CIO leaders meeting in Mi-
ami decided privately to stay on
President Nixon's Pay Board
despite what they called efforts
by industry and public members
to harrass them into quitting
and blame them for any failure
of new wage controls, it was
learned.

Rep. Ronald Dellums (D-Calif.) has charged that an agree- the firm enjoyed its best profit
ment between the United States and Iceland dating back to the margin.
Kennedy administration restricted the number of black troops as- The Construction Industry
signed to the North Atlantic island country. Stabilization Committee yester-
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
PRESENTS
DONOVAN
in concert
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 8:30 p.m.
Bowen Field House
TICKETS-$3.50, $4.50, $5.50
Available at
" McKenny Union Ticket Of fice
" Ann Arbor Music Mart, Liberty St.
" Michigan Union
I

SHOP TONIGHT AND FRIDAY
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

B

CINEMCA II
presents
BOB DYLAN
in
DON'T
LOOK
BACK
(1965)

American Revolutionary Media presents

a jaunty jacket for
Miss J suits her
style just fine.
Our double-breasted
pea jacket by Karen is
wool/camel hair/nylon,
bonded for lightweight
warmth. Camel or navy.
7-15 sizes. $55.

experimental,

live theater

The Brown Street Theater Acting Co.
from Madison, Wisconsin
in

I

I

Hot

Wankel

0

m

four one-act plays with a purpose
a lively and unique presentation of play written for home economics students in the 1930's.
THE IMPORTANCE OF PERSONAL APPEARANCE, MOTHER HUBBARD'S BIRTHDAY
PARTY, THE AWAKENING OF AMY BRANDT and FOOD FAIRIES PARTY, plays upon the
lessons of proper conduct taught to high school students. It combines old-fashioned scripts
and a new theatrical style to provide an involving live theater experience.
"a blasphemous presentation which plays upon
.s _ . ____ - - I - J . i* M //

I

I

E m

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