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November 17, 1971 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-17

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Vvednesdcay, November 17, 1971

Page Eight THE MiCHIGAN I~A1LY Wednesday, November 17, 1971

Annual meeting held
by peace researchers
By JANET GORDON
The Peace Research Society's annual North American
meeting, originally to be hosted by the University's Center for
the Research on Conflict Resolution (CRCR), was held Sun-
day through Tuesday at the Campus Inn.
Psychology Prof. Robert Hefner, CRCR's former director,
called the group an international organization of mathe-
matics-oriented social scientists interested-in peace research.
The Regents closed down CRCR this summer citing finan-

ENACT opens recycling
center tomorrow at 'U'
By LYNN ANNE SHEEHAN
A campus recycling day being held tomorrow may be the
first step in establishing a permanent walk-in recycling sta-
tion on central campus, and perhaps a north campus station
also.
The temporary station sponsored by ENACT (Environ-
mental Action for Survival) will operate between 7:30 a.m.
and 5:30 p.m. tom'orrow at :the north end of East University.
According to John Richter, present director of ENACT,
the trial station was set up to demonstrate the feasability of

Mich. group
war protest
small in -D.C.
(Continued from page 1)
the Union are staging demonstra-
tions in the nation's capital.
But the body count stopped at 94.
Getting large turnouts has for
a long time been the saving grace
of the p e a c e effort. Anti - war
demonstrations have consistently
and overwhelmingly overshadowed
those called to show support for
the war.
Yet some observers felt the
sparsely patronized "daily death
toll" now under way could well be,
Washington's last Vietnam war
protest.
"I'm discouraged but not with-
out hope," said Barbara Fuller,
chairman of the Interfaith Council
for Peace which coordinated Mich-
igan's participation in the "daily
death toll."
"We're glad American troops are
coming home," Fuller said. "But it
becomes more and more difficult
to understand what we're doing to
the Vietnamese. It's sad to read
headlines that only five GI's were
killed last week when in fact
hundreds of Asians are being killed
and maimed every day by Ameri-
can bombs."
An estimated 150 persons came
in the Michigan delegation, in-
cluding 40 from Ann Arbor, 30
from Saginaw andl smaller num-
bers from Detroit, Flint, Grand
Rapids, Bay City, Lansing, Benton
Harbor, Wayland and Marquette.

cial reasons for its termina-
tion.
They contended that the cen-
ter was not receiving enough out-
side support and that the salaries
being paid to CRCR staff would
have to be cut from the budget.
During the conference, about
sixty conferees from all over the
United States and Canada partici-
pated in a panel discussion on the
"Adjustment of the U.S. Economy
to Reductions in Military Spend-
ing," and attended talks on models
of international relations. They
heard papers on such topics as the
mid-east, the arms race and "Rec-
iprocity, Reaction and Continuity
in U.S.-Soviet-Chinese Relations."
Hefner, the host of the confer-
ence, mentioned that he wrote a
letter inviting President Fleming to
give the welcoming address. Flem-
ing refused, according to Hefner,
saying that someone who knew
more about peace research should
speak.
"I then asked him to comment
at the meeting on why the Uni-
versity had terminated one of the
only peace research centers in the
world," Hefner explained. He char-
acterized Fleming's second refusal
as "curt".
Hefner continued, "I gave the
welcoming speech as the ex-direc-
tor of the center and speculated
on the significance of its closing."
He stated that the closing had
caused international concern.
The closing of the center by the
Regents came as a result of a re-
commendation of the Executive
Committee of the literary college.
The center was often involved in
controversy because of its support
of manyradicalcauses. Because of
ethis factor, there were charges that
the Regents' actions were political-
ly motivated.

Board asks
fee change
(Continued from page 1)t
during which the proposed plant
will b e c o m e effective, StokesI
assures.
Although Hay predicts that "the
University will probably break
even financially," Stokes claims
that-if the new system results inE
students spending less time tot
complete their programs-the Uni-
versity will probably lose money.
The proposed new postcandidacyk
enrollment is almost certain toc
create pressure for earlier candi-
dacy, Hay explains.
"The average length of time that
a graduate student now spendsk
earning his doctorate is eightt
years," explains Stokes, "and we
would like to encourage students
to finish their work at a quicker
pace.'
The proposal is "essentially a
good deal," explains Dan Fox,
president of the Rackham Student
Government (RSG).
In speaking before the Executive
Board last week, RSG expressed
approval of the proposal with the
exception of the proposal's omis-
sion of the in absentia student and
the lack of provisions for the tran-
sition between the old and the new
systems.
The proposal has been criticized
as harmful to students who are
able to complete their dissertation
work in less than the minimum
time requirement and who do much
of their dissertation work in the
field as an "in absentia" student.
"I question the University's defi-
nition of gross inequities," says
Chris Unger, Grad.
Union Board
adds member
(Continued from page 1)
in time for the board's meeting,
next month.
Demands for student parity
are based on the claim that stu-
dents use the Union's facilities
more than any other group, and
hence are entitled to great rep-
resentation on its policy board.
Proponents also point to the fact
that part of the Union's funds
come from male students who
contribute several dollars to the
Union each year out of their tui-j
tion fees.

recycling to University offic-
ials.
In addition, he said, ENACT
hopes to get an estimate of the
volume of disposables around cam-
pus.
But the most important thrust
of tomorrow's activities, said Rich-
ter, is "to get the students to par-
ticipate, and find out if they
really want a recycling center on
campus."
This first attempt to involve the
academic community in recycling
will be directed toward glass be-
cause present facilities are best
equipped for handling this ma-
terial. ENACT also has the most
experience in this side of recycling.
The experience of ENACT has
been, according to Richter, "that
once the glass recycling works,
paper and cans tend to follow
naturally."
It has been requested that only
brown and clear glass be brought
to the station. All glass should be
cleaned to prevent health hazards
and metal rinds should be re-
moved. Paper labels may be left on.
Blacks meet
School Board
(Continued from page 1)
ended by a close vote at a mass
meeting Sunday night, where de-
mands were presented by the black
steering committee.
According to Stewart, at Monday
night's meeting, "The demands
were not given an unreasonable
deadline for meeting them, there
was some recognition that some
of thehdemands wouldtake time,
and that some- of the demands
couldanotbe solved by board ac-
tion alone."
The school board caucused after
the presentation of demands, to
work out their preliminary re-
sponse.
As yet, there has been no indi-
cation of the reaction of either the
steering committee or the school
authorities.
School officials reported normall
attendance at Ann Arbor's second-
ary schools yesterday-the second
day after the strike ended. Parents
continue to patrol at some of the
secondary schools.
Meanwhile a group of white par-
ents and students in favor of the
black demands, will attend to-
night's meeting to show their sup-
port, according to acting chairman
Ruth Zwifler.
Tonight's open meeting is set for
7:30 at Newport, school, 2775 New-
port Rd.
'I

Research
proposal,
challenged
(Continued from page 1)
generally by the University com-
munity."
Although Fleming's statement
also announced that the Univer-
sity is attempting to disaffiliate
itself from Willow Run Labora-
tories, where most of the Uni-
versity's classified research is
performed, the transfer of the
laboratories to a non-profit cor-
poration would probably take at
least a year so assembly's plan
would still be relevant.
To meet Fleming's criticisms,
the assembly could revise the
policy themselves at their next
monthly meeting; the University
Senate-comprised of 2,800 pro-
fessors, researchers and admin-
istrators could change it in their
semi-annual meeting next week;
or the Regents could alter the
policy before accepting it.
Fleming has promised that the
Regents will not make any deci-
sions on the policy at their
monthly meetings which take
place tomorrow and Friday, but
the issue, will be brought up.
In order for the University
Senate to alter the policy a two-
thirds vote is necessary to place
the item on the agenda, which
would have to be followed by a
simple majority to approve any
changes.
The most probable place for
any changes to be made, how-
ever, is in the Regents Room.
Fleming's statement said his
questions were ones "I would
want to ask and I suppose the
Regents will ask."
Considering Fleming's p a s t
record of swaying regental de-
cisions that possibility seems
quite likely.0

Location of
women's unit
threatened
The future of the Women's Cri-
sis Clinic became threatened last
night as controversy arose between
the Office of Student Services
(OSS) and the Michigan Union
Board over the authority to allo-
cate space in the Union.
The Pendleton Library, located
in the Union, was given to the
Women's Crisis Clinic by OSS last
month. But Jeff Kaplan, president
of the Union's board, said "OSS
pays no rent on the Library and
thus has no control over the allo-
cation of its use."
Kaplan explained that no struc-
tural changes of the library will be
allowed until the board receives
and approves the same proposa#
OSS passed.
As established, the clinic func-
tions as a voluntary organization
offering support, information and
referral service to women.
Marnie Heyn, an organizer of
the Clinic, notes that no phone has
yet been installed in the Unio4
office but messages may be left
with the Women's Movement Of-
fice-662-5400.
Turnout for
election light
(Continued from page 1)
ing the funding increase.
In the LSA election, 11 candi-
dates are vying for 10 seats on,
executive council. Two referende
are included on the ballot. One
concerns amending the LSA con-
stitution, while the other deals
with whether the government
should be -funded 50c per student
per term.

-Associated Press
Taking a di p
These tours sure are murder on the feet! Cuban Premier Fidel
Castro relaxes yesterday during an outing in the Pacific Ocean
off the Chilean coast.
A tt-ca inmates abused

DAILY. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17 Nov. 18, afternoon-Emory University
Law School; Mon., Nov. 22, all day-
"arvard Law School.
Day G'a end rHJOB OFFERS, anyone who will gradu-
ate between 8/72 and 7/73 is asked to
Psychiatry A. Watson, "Law, Law- report all job offersnto our office, whe-
yers and Judges: An Arena for Social ther or not you accept the job. We
Psychiatry," Children's Psychiat. Hosp., need the statistics for the College
10:1 am.leb, Otii Placement Council, and also for our
Computing tr: E. Gelenbe, "Optimi- own use. Call 764-7460 and ask for Mrs.
zation of Paged Systems," 130 Physics- Cogan.
Astron., Noon.

4
I
{,,',
i',
,,
#,,,,,.
i

tlassiied
Ads

ATTICA, N.Y. (P)-Inmates at
Attica Correctional Facility re-
main on edge and most prisoner
grievances have not been acted
upon, a special investigative
panel established by New York
Governor Nelson Rockefeller re-
ported yesterday.
The five member board said
that "the danger of prisoner,
harassment and the likelihood of
unjust retaliatory acts continues
unchecked."
The board was named Sept. 15
to examine conditions at the
prison following an insurrection
last summer in which 43 persons
-32 inmates and 11 prison per-
sonnel - perished. M o s thwere
killed in the gunfire behind
which state forces moved in.
During early tours of the pri-
son, the panel said it found the
most pressing needs were ease-
ment of s e v e r e overcrowding,
filling prisoners' medical inven-
tories and increased monitoring
in view of inmates' allegations
of post-riot beatings.
Other needs it said it found
were for bath facilities, provis-
ion for writing paper, tooth-
paste and personal articles, re-
placement of dentures and eye-

glasses, and improvements in>
food.
The report said the institu-
tion's food service was "badly
disrupted by large-scale looting.
of food supplies in the, store-
house and the fires set there,"
so that only two meals were fed
inmates in their cells.

I

NOON BOOK DISCUSSION
THURSDAY
3545 Student Activities Bldg
THE BLACK WOMAN
Edited by TONI CADE
TOMORROW IS TOMORROW
by JOYCE LADNER
reviewed by GLORIA MARSHALL
-Next Week-
EDUCATION AND ECSTASY
OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
Michigan Union, 3rd floor

Anatomy: J. Avery, "Effects of Neu-
ral Resection on Rate of Dentin For-
mation and Tooth Eruption," 4804 Med.
Set. II, 1:10 pm.
Computing Ctr: G. Pirkola, "The New
File-Sharing Capability in MTS," Semi-
nar Rm, Computing Ctr., 3-5 pm. f
LSA Coffee Hour: "Women and thec
Univ.," J. Campbell, M. Jackson, & D.
McGuigan are this week's guests; men
will be welcome, 2549 LSA, 3-4:30 pm.
Social Work: R. Stuart, "Recent Re-
search Findings on Behavior Control in
the School and Implications for Social
Work Practices," 2056 Frieze Bldg., 3:30k
pm.
Botany: G. Estabrook, "The Taxir
System : Managing Descriptive Data'
with a Computer," 1139 Nat. Sci., 4 pm.
Statistics: L. Jensen, "Trying to:
Solve a Diffusion Equation Occurring'
in Population Genetics," 2440 Mason
Hall, 4 pm.1
Physics: B. Krauskaar, U. of Wis.,'
"Diffuse Cosmic X-Rays," P&A Colloq.
Rm., 4 pm.
Journalism: Howard James, Pulitzer
Prize winner, "Reporting: American
Style," Aud. C, Angell Hall, 4 pm.
Speech Dept. Performance: "White
Lies," and "Masks of Angels," Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 pm.
Engineering, A&D, and IST: K.
Wachsmann, U. of Southern Cal., "The
Civilization of Machines," Power Cen-
ter, 8 pm.
Cont. Ed. of Women and W. Euro-
pean Studies: N. Davis, U of Toronto.
"Urban Women and the Reformation,"
UGLI Multipurpose Rm, 8 pm.!
Dance Program: "Africa," C. Black--I
well, Echorling Aud., Sch. of Ed., 8:30
pm.
Placement Service
LAW SCHOOL INTERVIEWS, two.
schools have just made dates to inter-
view prospective law school candidates.
Call 764-7460 to make appts. Thurs.,

Organization Notices
Prof. Charles Schmitt of Leeds Uni-
versity, England, will deliver a lecture
at The University of Michigan Wednes-
day (Nov. 17). His talk will be on "An-
cient Skepticism in the Renaissance:
Italy and the North Compared," and
will begin at 4 p.m. in the West Con-
ference Room of Rackham Building.
His lecture is sponsored by the U-M
department of history and the Program
for Comparative Studies in History.
India Student's Association: India
Week-End Friday, Nov. 19, 9:00 PM,
Snacks, Music and lone hour live enter-
tainmnent: Saturday, Nov. 20, 9:00 PM:
Snacks, Music, movie-' Indian Women"
& "Explorer", and party to follow.
Ann Arbor chapter of Zero Popula-
tion Growth: Nov. 17, 7:30 pm, 331
Thompson Debate: Is There A Popula-
tion Problem in the United States.
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
SLee
' Male
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

PUBLI

INVITED

UNIVERSITY
DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS
(formerly Mich. Dem. Club)

BENJAMIN DE MOTT
Professor of English, Amherst College

INSIDE ANN ARBOR
POLITICS
Parties, Personalities, Problems.
With Councilman NORRIS THOMAS, Law Stu-
dent and former Daily Editor MARK LEVIN,
City Intern DON CHAMBERLAIN
WED., NOV. "7t'-7:30 P.M.
3532 SAB

4

will speak at the

i

TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

I

1

Saturday Seminar Series
of the
School of\ Education
Dr. De Mott is the author of
several articles in CHANGE Magazine
and of SURVIVAL AND THE SEVENTIES,
which deals with Columbia University.

Glass Recycling
Thursday, Nov. 18
1:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
SAVE YOUR CLEAR AND
BROWN GLASS ONLY

0

LORRAINE BEEBE
Former State Senator
Member, Policy Committee of the
Nat'l Woman's Political Caucus

Saturday, November

20,

1971

in RACKHAM ASSEMBLY HALL, 4th floor

tAn~AArkl IM Dfnl lTlf c

111111

11

lilt

I

I

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