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November 16, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552

C14 r

Stci4itin

Datit

page three

BUSINESS PHONE: 764.0554

Ann Arbor, Michigan Tuesday, November 16, 1971

6th EEK EI~1~f!~i DIAL 8-6416
DIShows~l
6th WEEK Sos
At 7-9 P.M.
"WILL GLUE YOU TO YOUR CHAIR AND FILL YOU
WITH AWE. THE PHOTOGRAPHY IS A MIRACLE OF
ARTISTRY. THE SOUND TRACK IS SUPER."
-Liz Smith. Cosmopolitan Maaazine

news briefs
By The Associated Press
CAPT. ERNEST MEDINA testified yesterday that he lied to
Col. Oran Henderson about the nature and extent of civilian
deaths during the My Lai attack.
Medina said he reported to Henderson that there were 20 to
28 accidental deaths from artillery and helicopter fire, although sub-
ordinates had said that 106 civilians were killed by ground shooting.
Henderson is currently charged with intentionally failing to con-
duct a proper investigation of atrocity reports, of not reporting actual '
or suspected war crimes and of lying to the Pentagon inquiry.
* * *
100,000 COAL MINERS returned to work yesterday and United
Mine workers officials expected most of the nation's miners to
resume work today after receiving from local leaders the report P
of their new 3-year contract. PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Although the new contract violates Phase 2 economic policies, Chiao Kuan-hua, smiles fo
with an estimated 30 to 39 per cent wage increase instead of the his seat as a delegate at th
Pay Board's 5.5 per cent recommendation, Gov. Arch Moore Jr.
believes the Pay Board will approve the package. IMPORTS HIT:
Both sides credited the Pennsylvania governor for helping nego-

China

hits

. .
foreign policy in
U-N debut speech
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (1) - The People's Republic of
China made its UN debut yesterday with a bitter attack on the
United States. The top Chinese delegate demanded the im-
mediate withdrawal"of U.S. forces from Indochina and of U.S.
military support of Taiwan.
Chiao Kuan-hua, Peking's deputy foreign minister, took
the floor in the UN General Assembly and accused the United
of aggression by sending U.S. naval forces into the Taiwan
Strait and by its military intervention in Vietnam, Cambodia
and Laos.
The attack came at the end ofu"

U.S.

-Associated Press
CHINA'S Deputy Foreign Minister,
r photographers yesterday as he takes
he United Nations.

THE ALLEY CINEMA
330 MAYNARD'
TONIGHT ONLY-TUES., NOV. 16
GATE OF HELL
dir. TEINOSKE KINUGASA
Japanese, in color
" A BREAKTHROUGH IN COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY
" GRAND PRIZE-Cannes Film Festival
" Academy Award-Best Foreign Film
" Academy Award-Best Color Photography
" Best Foreign Film-NY Film Critics Award
" Golden Laurel Award-Edenburgh Film Fest.

tiate the contract wnieh ncludes a pay Doostf rom $37 to $50 a day
and increased benefits.
PRIME MINISTER INDIRA GANDHI appealed yesterday for
calm in India's crisis with Pakistan while border clashes continued
to test the fragile peace between the two nations.
"We have refused to be excited by threat or provocation from
across our borders," she told India's parliament.
Later, a Defense Ministry spokesman charged Pakistani forces}
with a score of military provocations over the weekend along India's
eastern and western borders.
80 DEMONSTRATORS turned out at Wayne State University
yesterday, in an attempt to dissuade students from registering
for the winter quarter in protest of a 20 per cent tuition increase.
Demonstrators reportedly were having little success in getting
students to pass up registration or at least pleading poverty when
they register and paying only a $20 fee.
NO PAY ASSURANCI
Agency seeks voluni
force for aid pro gra

SHOWS AT 7 & 9:30

$1.00

COMING WED.--"SHOP ON MAIN STREET"

(MEN WELCOME)
JEAN CAMPBELL (Director, Center for Continuing Education of
Women)
MARION JACKSON (Assistant Chairman-Freshman-Sophomore
Counseling)
DOROTHYs McGUIGAN (Center for Continuing Education of
Women)
ON
Women and the University
at the
.SA Student-Faculty Hour
Wednesday, Nov 17th 2549 LSA Bldg.
3-3:30-Informal Discussion
3:30-4:30-Open Forum

WASHINGTON (P) -- The Agency for Inter-
national Development (AID) has asked its em-
ployes to work on a voluntary basis after con-
gressional authority for the U.S. foreign-aid pro-
gram ended at midnight yesterday.
State Department spokesman Charles Bray said
yesterday the request was made even though no
assfirances could be given whether or when the
employes would be paid.
Bray repeated the administration view that the
foreign-aid program and the AID administration
of it comes to a legal end at midnight and there
will be no way to guarantee the payroll for work
done afterward.
He said the situation is unfair to the employes
and that the real solution would be for Congress

to pass a resolu
at last year's spe
However, the
highly unlikely a
passed before the
The House has
Senate has not s
Senate has pas
but the House h
According to B
there are enoug
AID" to keep the
He acknowledg
paycheck Nov. 23
last Friday.

S. Viet governmentf
to devalue currency
SAIGON (R) -w South Vietnam's government announced yesterday
that it will drastically devalue its currency in an attempt to smash
the black market and limit profits of some Vietnamese importers.
The devaluation of its monetary unit, the piasters is also aimedr
at encouraging exports and attracting foreign investors.-
Economics Minister Pham Kim Ngoc said the devaluation billT
will be sent to the National Assembly as the first step in implement-f
ing President Nguyen Van Thieu's sweeping program of economic re-1
forms.
Current rates vary from 118 per dollar for U.S. - funded imports
to 275 per dollar under the "accommodation rate" and nearly 400t
_ -- - - per dollar on the black market. }
ES In a separate proclamation,t
Thieu announced that the govern-i
ment would enact "a new and pro-
gressive investment law to pro-4
vide generous privileges and guar-t
antees to all investors, both do- t
mestic and foreign" in an attempt
ill U.L TOF Ngoc said three new rates of
foreign exchange will be estab-
lished :r
tion continuing the aid program
nding level. -275 piasters per dollar for U.t
S.-funded imports.
situation in Congress made it pr..
nyitutininCng ressnmaude it -400 piasters per dollar for im-
any continuing resolution could be ports funded by government oft
midnight deadline. Vietnam foreign exchange re-
passed such a resolution but the serves. ^
cheduled any similar action. The -410 piasters per dollar for ex-
sed two new foreign aid bills, ports, foreign investment and pro-.
as not acted on them. fits on foreign investment, and theF
"accommodation rate" u n d e r
3ray, the State Department feels which GI's and foreign civilians
h "service-minded employes in purchase piasters for their per-
program going. sonal use.
ged the AID workers are due a Reliable sources said all three
to cover the work period ending rates will be subject to review and
change by the government on a
"weekly, perhaps even daily" ba-
sis, making them in effect modi-C
Ed itorial Staff fied floating rates of foreign ex-i
-AY- ---- change. .s
DAY ovemer 1 18In Vietnam, U.S. troops now
number little more than a thirde
T OF SPEECH of peak American strength in the
ATORY THEATRE war, as the pace of withdrawal
ets nearlymatches that of the buildupk
E LIES six years ago.
SHAFFER The U.S. Command announced
ND ; Monday a cut of 2,800 men,
F ANGELS bringing authorized U.S. troop
PERYALIS strength in Vietnam to 188,300 asf
Frieze Building of last Thursday-lowest sincet
4:10 P.M. December 1965. The peak U. S.A
theatre. is filled presence was 543,000 men in April,
on FREE 1969.1

a day-long ceremony of welcome,
including a speech by U.S. Ambas-
sador George Bush who expressed
the hope that Peking's entry into
the United Nations would help ef-
forts toward peace.
The Chinese delegate further at-
tacked imperialism, colonialism
and the "superpowers," which he
did not identify by name but re-
ferred to several times as "one or
two" - apparently meaning t h e
United States and the S o v i e t
Union.
Chiao also threw his support be-
hind the Arab countries in t h e
Middle. East conflict, charging
Israel with aggression and d e -
manding the withdrawal of Israeli
forces from occupied Arab terri-
tory.
The United States, which took a
severe jolt in the expulsion of Na-
tionalist China on Oct. 25, still
had not made up its mind Sunday
night whether it would send Am-
bassador Bush to the speech-mak-
ing ceremonies.
In addressing the 131-nation
assembly as the representative of
the host country, Bush referred to
the issues of principle that divided
the assembly during last month's
debate, but said:
"Those differences should not
obscure the proposition on which
nearly all of us, including t h e
United States, agreed: that t h e
moment in history has arrived for
the People's Republic of China to
be in the United Nations."
The five-man Chinese delega-
tion was headed by Deputy Fore-
ign Minister Chiao Kuan-hua. It
included Ambassador Huang Hua,
Fu Hao, Hsiung Hsiang-hui and
Chen Yu.
Unit warns of
campus unrest
A report on the campus tur-
moil resulting from the Cambod-
ian incident of May, 1970, warned
yesterday that similar widespread
student protests and disruption of
education could easily reoccur.
The report, entitlesd "May 1970:
The Campus Aftermath of Cam-
bodia and Kent. State," was pre-
pared as part of the Carnegie
Commission's five-year study of
American higher education.
It warns that "a calculated gov-
ernmental action, or more tragi-
cally an unintended consequence
of such an action" as the K e n t
State deaths could ignite t h e
"tinder of discontent on the cam-
pus."

Limits sought
for military
funding bill
WASHINGTON (-) -Anti-war
congressmen are urging their col-
leagues that a vote for military
appropriations without restrictions
attached amounts to a declaration
of war.
Rep. Michael Harrington (D-
Mass.) sent a letter to House
members yesterday saying that in
view of recent court decisions it
no longer is possible to separate
appropriations from the question
of authorization for the Vietnam
war,
Harrington asked support of the
Boland - Mansfield amendment,
to be offered by Rep. Edward Bo-
land, (D-Mass.) when a military
appropriations bill reaches the
House floor today.
The Boland - Mansfield amend-
ment would prohibit the use of
appropriated funds for military
operations in Indochina after next
June 1, provided U.S. prisoners of
war are released by their captors.
Recent court decisions have held
that by consistently appropriating
funds for the war and providing
a draft to man it Congress has
given the constitutional equivalent
of a declaration of war.
Anti-war lawyers have asked the
courts to declare the war uncon-
stitutional because it has not been
ormally declared by Congress.
While losing that argument in
the key court cases decided thus
far, the lawyers argue now that
the court interpretations place
pressure on legislators who have
said they oppose the war but don't
consider their votes for military
appropriations as support for
President Nixon's war policies.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Cider and Doughnuts

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Join the Daily
WEDNESDAY & THURSI
DEPARTMENI
STUDENT LABOR]
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WHITI
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MASKS 01
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promptly at
or earlier if the
Admissic

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL 5:30
WEDNESDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.

A

- _ -
T 0
l ~l~l '1y/11 p
f m 0

GRAD COFFEE HOUR
WED., NOV. 11
4-6 P.M.
COME FOR
CIDER
and
DOUGHNUTS

hand-warming gloves t
of knit with leather
The comfort of acrylic/nylon
knit combine with the
fashion and durability of
soft leather on the backs and
palms of these snug gloves.
A. Cross-stitch suede;
wine/navy or grey/red. $5.
B. Buckled pigskin cork/brown,

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2
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fj( > t iJ
L i..d'' iii : > 2 f
_t.
! :
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.r,.

RACKHAM
4th Floor

fv
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- Compliments of a friend

F / -,44

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