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November 14, 1971 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-14

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r

Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 14, 1971

Candidates and Issues:

PAID POLITICAL ADV.

U

5T

A

Funding
Proposal
This election is a crucial one as
far as the future of student gov-!
ernment is concerned. The stu-
dents of each individual school
must decide whether they want
real representation and effective;
student power.
The LSA Student Government
has been stifled in attempts to-
ward meaningful a c a d e m i c
change. There are two reasons for
our ineffectiveness in the past:
1) we have been depending on the
Administration for our funds,
and 2) the funds that we have
been receiving are hardly worth
mentioning.
The whole idea of student power
is based on student support. As it
stands now, our financial situation
is in the hands of the Dean and
the Executive Committee. Should
we do anything to offend them,
they can ruin us by entirely cut-
ting off what little we do receive.
The whole problem is analogous
to industry paying 'for labor un-
ions.
Even though the Dean is trying
to help us, it would be impossible,
for him to appropriate us with all
of the money we need. If we were
provided with enough money, we
could effectively take on the prob-
lems of students in LS&A; we
could staff our office full-time so
that students might be able to
come to us with any sort of prob-
lem concerning their education;
we could find out what sorts of
things need changing by sending
out questionnaires to all students
in the college; we would be more
able to communicate with our con-
stituency by means of regular
newsletters, if we had a mimeo
machine and money to buy paper;
we could support groups such as
the Committee on the Underclass
Experience, thus gaining valuable
resource material; money would
also allow us to start moving on
a comprehensive Complaint Serv-
ice which is still in the planning
stages due to lack of funds.
The list is endless, but unless
students are willing to pay 50c,
the whole thing .is nothing more
than a dream. It's hard to ask
people to tax themselves, but we
wouldn't be doing it unless we
strongly felt that our legitimacy
depends on it.
Also appearing on our ballot
will be a proposal to amend our
Constitution. The particular clause
in question refers to the number
of people required to make up a
quorum of the L.S.&A. Assembly.
In order to facilitate institution
of the Assembly as soon as pos-
sible, the proposed amendment
calls for changing the quorum of
the body from twenty-five to
"twenty-five or one-half the rep-
resentatives to which existing de-
partmental associations are en-
titled, whichever is lower."
The College Assembly, a body
that is required by the L.S.&A.
Constitution but has not been set
up yet, is to be composed of rep-
resentatives from Undergraduate
Associations within each depart-
ment. Since not all departments
have Associations, the L.S.&A. Ex-
ecutive Council has decided to go
ahead and convene Assembly (the
legislative arm of the Govern-
ment) while working on establish-
ing Associations in departments
that have none.
Platform for
James

GIlickman
At present I am not very aware
of what L.S.&A. Executive Coun-
cil is doing and is planning to do.
However, I will try to affect three
major changes:
1. Institution of a free tutoring
service set up for L.S.&A. students
by L.S.&A. students.
2. Abolition of the foreign lan-
guage requirement for distribu-
tion.
3. Offering all courses outside of
distribution and major fields, on
a P-P basis.__ _ -

ELECTION
SCHEDULE
Tues. & Wed.
Nov. 16&b11
LSA POLLING PLACES:
Diag
Fishbowl
Chem. Bldg.
UGLI
Frieze Bldg.

Platform for
Mark
Brissette
The L.S.&A. Student Govern-
ment exists basically because the
students of the Literary College
have not had any voice in school
educational policies or the deci-
sion making processes which shape
their academic lives at the Univer-

Platform for
ACTION MANDATE

Bob Stephens
Richard Ross
Steve Vagozzi
Why is the LSA Student Gov-
ernment so ineffective? Partly be-
cause, as its members claim, in-
adequate funding by politically-

Chuck Barquist
Carl Herstein
Dave Hornstein
chine, LSA government could in-
crease its own publicity efforts
enormously-and it could provide
mimeo services, at cost, to allLSA
students and faculty, a service un-

should a
meetings
in secret,
mittee, a;
parity the
Counsel
Counselli:
wretched
Mart, on
programs
ity stude
of Cours
tical reasc
courses
weeks, sh
As noted
nn ' -I--.~n

sity. interested faculty reduces it to available elsewhere. Bei-styl
The faculty, which wields so .merely surviving. But its greater III. Building'a Mass Base: Ev- sign their
much power, does nothing in terms failure is political. It has refused erything depends on organizing tended tc
of initiating programs or action to mobilize or even to communi- students. Student Associations. ously sim
in any direction. Out of 1500 mem- cate with the students it serves. Scores of students right now are
bers, 100 are necessary for a quor- The cultivation of faculty elites is working to effect change at the Govern
um at their monthly meetings. no substitute for organizing the most neglected, yet fundamental meeting"
Anyone who has visited their participation of concerned stu- level-the departments. LSA gov- ing facu
meetings can tell you a quorum dents in working to solve our com- ernment should be in contact and departme
is rarely obtained. But, yet, there mon problems. cooperation with the 8 or so un- committe
are so many areas that need re- Why an Action Mandate slate dergrad Associations - providing ed by re
evaluation, of six? Because only a major in- clerical support, publicity, money governme
During an undergraduate life in flux of new people can turn the and coordination in return for compatibl
the Literary College, up to % of a LSA Student Government around. grass-roots contacts, lobbying with student p
student's total credits can be in By hard work we hope to revital- faculty, and knowledgeable people IV. Fu
fulfilling distribution require- ize the LSA government by invol- to work at the all-College level, reliable f
ments. And no matter what the ving as many students as possible And the government should ac- LSA facu
theory behind these requirements, in the affairs of the government tively promote organizing students platform
they are not benefiting the stu- and of the College. By attacking in the other departments, making #service
dents. Often they discourage and the problems of communication, it possible to set up at long last present L
frustrate students and hurt their organization and participation we tis lower house, the College As- Executive
performance in other classes. Lit- consider it possible to make the sembly. - $400 over
tle can be said about opportunities LSA government, not an elite ,, A serve the
fnrchllofe iion~na hnr nv"i ~n__t,,+ ___ +,., .,_IA 'shadow government And

lso work to opening up
of committees that workj
like the Executive Coi-
is a step toward gaining
sere also.
ling and Course Mart.
ing, the College's most
operation,* and Course
ne of its few promising
, should be under major-
nt control. Cancellation
e Mart sections for poli-
5ons, or long lists of closed
within the first couple
ould never happen again.
, counselling should re-
rough formal scrutiny.
e freedom of students to
ir own study card, if ex-.
everyone, would enorm-
plify counselling red tape.
ance. Inefficient "town
-style rule by the govern-
lty-mainly conservative
nt heads and standing
emen-should be replac-
epresentative democratic
ent-a system much more
le, also, with eventual
participation at this level.
nding. Without adequate
funding, independent of
lty control, most of this
or of any major student-
programs is impossible.
LSA funding by the LSA
Committee leaves just
the cost of elections-to
needs of twelve thousand

Platform for
Kris
Sanoic

dents. If chosen as a member of
the council I would strive to make
the students more aware of the
roads open to them in solving their
porblemns.
As a Freshman I have much to
learn, not only about this Gov-
ernment, but also about this Uni-
versity. But, I feel that there is a
definite need on the Council for
Freshmen - not only to represent
our class, but also to learn the pro-
cedures of the Council so that the
Council might have a future after
all the upperclassmen have gradu-
ated.
In the short time that I've been
at U of M I've had the opportun-
ity to serve the Council as Secre-
tary (a non-voting member of the
Council). In this way I've already
begun to learn how the Council
operates.
There are many pressing prob-
lems facing the University today,
and not least among them is the
lack of opportunities for women to
hold' active positions on campus.
Just one example: there were on-
ly three women at the last Gov-
erning Faculty meeting. As the
only woman on the ballot I feel
that it is my duty to represent wo-
men and to speak for them.
The LS&A Student Government
can be an excellent government
only if we the students take the
time to build it. I would like to

'9

The LSA Student Government is
a relatively new government" on
campus. Because it is just develop-
ing many students are unaware of
its function and its services to the
students. It is the Government's
duty to make the students more
aware. The task is not an easy

'I'

Platform for
Neil
Aisenson

for students directing their own I
college programs. Students don't:
have parity on decision making:
bodies of the school yet, such asI
the Administrative Board. The listi
of problems goes on.
However, there are activities go-
ing on in the college that could1
prove fruitful. Course Mart has
become popular and should be ex-
panded. The Committee on Under-
graduate Education has been do-
ing research and will undoubtedly
offer suggestions to the newly-
formed Policy Committee, which
will begin meeting next term. But,
will action be taken on these sug-
gestions offered or will they sim-
ply be ignored as in the past. For
too long the students have not
been in charge of their academic
lives in the Literary College. We
have a chance to begin working
for action and change through the
L.S.&A. Student Government. And
if we do not use the government
as a vehicle for our student inter-
ests, we can only blame ourselves
for the continuation of our prob-
lems.

agency, but a serious instrument .1cU fVlllA1 ciu
ent wsers nsremany more students should be r- students. We strongly urge stu- one on such a large campus, and help in its construction by serving
for student power and LSA e-an e ste s d dents to vote for the College Gov- yet-it is a vital one-if there is to on the Executive Council. Please
m ganized in a system of standing ernment's Funding Plan appearing be a bridge for communication be- vote for Kris Sankovitch on Nov-
form.committees dealing with major
I. Academic Reform. LSA more of-. areas of College policy: Curricu- on the LSA and All-Campus bal- tween the faculty and the stu- ember 16, 1971.
ten operates to "channel" people lum, Counselling, Administration, lots. It asks students to set dues
into societal slots than to foster ; etc. Such watchdog committees of S0c per student per term to sup-
individual creativity, freedom and could oversee their College coun- port their school or college gov-
(self-) education. Grades which terparts and become expert in ernment. It has several important
distort and pollute any genuine particular areas if LSA adminis- rits It pc funding decisions
learning process should be abbl- tration. Their mere existence for the first time under deiocra-
ished and replaced by a pass/no would increase pressure for more tic student control; It provides
credit system. This is not unrea- student participation in these c o 11 e g e governments, especially
sonable inasmuch as sentiment standing committees. LSA, with enough money to have
against grading has been building 1 ea mac npoiyuadi
up recently, e.g.. Course Mart Publicity. To undertake this provides automatic, reliableafund-
courses are now pass/fail and Pi- large-scale organizing program, to ing independent of political con-
lot seminars will soon be pass no inform students of important de- trol of groups like the LSA Exe-
credit. velopments in LSA, to pressure for cutive Committee. Funding for
radical change-all this requires LSA is an absolute necessity -
Distribution Requirements, not- massive publicity efforts. This please vote "Yes" to provide it.
ably including language, merely means much more leafletting, ad- The Action Mandate in LSA
cloak the economic interests of vertising, etc. - spending more like the Radical Peoples Coalition
certain departments in pseudo- money and getting LSA govern- slate for SGC, believes that the
"Renaissance Man" rhetoric, and iment members out of their office so-called "crisis" of student gov-
other measures would also reduce into the community. Especially, ernment is caused by its poverty,
also should be abolished. Many we believe LSA needs a permanent apathy and elitism. Ultimately, on-
coercion in learning-for instance, newsletter under student editorial ly popular involvement can make
eliminating the course "drop" control, informing students, ex- LSA government effective. Other-
deadline. ploring alternatives to present po- wise it may simply fade away, the
How might we deliver on these licies and working all the time to victim of one too many uncontest-
promises, which others have made change them. Real student power ed elections. Please vote and also
before? By a concrete, well- requires informed and well-coordi think about getting involved -
planned strategy of action: - nated student groups forming a maybe we can make a difference.
whole infrastructure of student in- -
First, we would commission stitutions paralleling the LSA hi-
comprehensive attitude surveys of erarchy and struggling for stu-
the entire student body, as well as dent interests at every level where
formal studies of the real-life decisions are made. THE COLLEGE FUNDING PLAN
functioning of these Ivory-Tower

I am running for a seat on the

Executive Council of L.S.&A. Stu-
dent Government because it's time
to get this college moving. Stu-!
dents ought to have more say
about their education; there are
far too many decisions which are
imposed upon us. L.S.&A. Student
Government has the potential to
be a force for change in this col-
lege, but this requires work from
those in the government and the
active support of all students. Ex-
ecutive Council apathy has result-
ed in underutilization of avenuesj
to change within the college beau-
rocracy until very recently. And:
Council has clearly failed to in-
volve its constituents in helping
to work and push for change.
One reason for Council's inabil-
ity to comunicate with those it
represents is inadequate funding
and the resulting inadequate pub-
licity. I support the funding pro-
posals; both to increase the
amount of funding and to change
the method of funding of L.S.&A.
student government. It is ridicu-
lous to have a student govern-
ment funded by, and thus respon-
sible to, the administrators of
L.S.&A. I also stand in favor of
the expansion of pass-fail grading,
and working towards easing and
ending as soon as possible distri-
bution requirements.
But you've heard campaign rhe-
toric many times before. I ask you
to vote for me because I am com-
mitted to action. A month ago, I
was appointed to fill a vacancy on
L.S.&A. Council. In that time, I've
worked on publicity for the fund-
ing proposal,- I've worked towards
establishing and increasing the in-
fluence of departmental undergra-
duate associations on departmen-
tal matters, as well as several oth-
er activities.
Let's work together to shake
this college into changing!

Platform for
Jonathan
Klein

I'm for good apple pie (but not
necessarily god, country or moth-
erhood). There being nothing else
I know about the L.S.&A. Execu-
tive Council about which I can
comment, I'll defer all such com-
ments until such time as I can do
so intelligently (probably after I'm,
elected and I can find out what
the damn thing does).
I ' r

Be Sure
YOU
VOTE
Nov.
16,17

p o 1 i c i e s, identifying student's
high-priority problems, undercut-
ting faculty complacency and gen-
erating pressure for change; then,
to work through the new Student
Faculty Policy Committee and
with other groups such as pro-
gressive faculty to make a case
against these evils and build a
united front against them; finally,
to employ every publicity medium
and working with SGC, depart-
mental associations and anyoneI
else-and basing our efforts on
the mass base we are concerned to
build-to launch a massive drive
against the greatest problems. The
LSA government has never tried
this--never trusted students to re-
spond to a government that has
earned their support. Why not
give it a try?
II. Student Services. There is
much the LSA government should
do to help individual students with
their day-to-day academic and
bureaucratic problems.
Complaint Service. LSA govern-
ment has discussed but not imp-
lenented a Complaint Service, es-
sentially manning a phone to hear
and act on student complaints.
To make it accessible and effect-
ive, though, the LSA government
needs a full-time work/study cler-
ical staff to maintain contacts
with key decision-makers, to keep
records and to be available tokact
on complaints 40 hours a week.
Copying Services. By acquiring
its own badly-needed mimeo ma-

III. LSA Structural Reform. LSA
oligarchic governance is itself a
major problem. Committee parity.
LSA government must resume its
efforts - well-received last spring
but never followed through - to
achieve student-faculty parity on
the Administrative Board. Aided
by its new standing committees, it
NEWSPAPERS
Friend of the
CONSUMERS

-4

Fr-i---

I

E'I

NOVEMBER

ART

FAIR

WHEN: Sunday, November 14, 12-6 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists Displaying and Selling Their
Crafts AND Free Entertainment

__.

I

Going Far?

I

WHO: Open to Everyone; No
Admission Charge

ATi& TRAVEL offers

I I;

11

0

I1

111111

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