100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November. 13, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

raura, oeme 13 17

City schools boycotted by
striking black students

(Continued from page 1)
nity worker. According to her, the
activities at the center were 'very
constructive."
Some of the adults at the center
suggested that the Civil Rights
Commission initiate a class action
suit for all black students against
the school board and the police de-
partment, but no decisions were
made.
When the discussions ended, the
students went to classes, taught by
some Model Cities staff, Univer-
sity students, and other volunteers.
Instructors stressed black history
and discussed racism in a histori-
cal perspective.
Also on the schedule were Eng-
lish, math and political education
classes.
After a hot dog lunch and
classes, students watched movies
about Cuba and most went home
around 3 p.m. Throughout the day,
most students cooperated with the
volunteer teachers.
Ann Arbor police reported no in-
cidents of violence yesterday.
The conflicts which led to the
boycott included the stabbing of a
wvhite girl, Julie Callison, who was
treated for leg wounds Thursday
and released; eight unrelated ar-
rests, and physical harassment of
blacks at Pioneer High School.
Within the past month, several
conflicts have broken out at Huron,
also.
Yesterday afternoon, some 150
black University students rallied
in the Fishbowl. A University em-
ploye who has a ,child in the city
school system spoke in favor of
the strike.
However, some students did not
believe= the tactic would be effec-
tive. Others suggested a black
strike at the University in support
of Ann Arbor's black community.
Shortly after the rally there was
an altercation between a photog-
rapher from The Daily and several
Daily Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Day Calendar
Education Lecture: J. Cosand, "Com-
munity Involvement in Higher Educa-
tion,"" Rackham Aud., 9 am.
Emphasis on Women: Women's Abor-
tion Teach-In, Aud. A, Angell Hall, 9:30
am.-6 pm.
Hockey: Michigan vs. Western On-
tario, Coliseum, 8 pm.
Music School: "Bandorama," Hill
Aud., 8 pm.
Music School: Contemporary Dired-
tions Ensemble, "The New Diatoni-
cism," Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
History Dept. Informal Discussion: R.
Radosh, City Univ. of N.Y., discusses his
new book Conservative Critics of the
American Empire, 1429 Mason Hall, 4:30
pm
Placement Service
ANNOUNCEMENT: Johnson & John-
son Will be recruiting Tues. & Wed.,.
Nov. 16, 17 in our off.; will be special
seminars for minority students and
women Tues. at 10:30 and 11:30 am.,
Rm 304 Mich. Union; call 764-7460 to
make appts. for indiv. interviews.
SUMMER PLACEMENT, Los Alamos
Scientific Labs, New Mexico, summer
jobs avail. for students'who will have
BS by June, 1972 in engr., physical
sci., and math; details at SPS, 212 S.
A.B.; deadline Jan. 15.

black students who demanded his
film.
The photographer agreed to turn
over the film in his camera.. The
students were unconvinced he had
given them the right film, however,
and in an enusuing scuffle he was
thrown to the ground and his
camera was broken.
Black University students will
meet today at 1 p.m. at trotter
House to decide their policies on
the boycott and related matters.

'U' cautious
(Continued from page 1)
for the most part that the Univer-
sity will be reluctant to increase
wages.
"I haven't even looked at what;
impact there might be costwise,"
associate housing director Claude
Orr said. "There is no money to
come from anywhere except from
room and board money."
"In terms of capacity to meet
new demands this year, it would
be difficult because we've built our
budget on the wages and salary
rates of this year," said University
Housing Director John Feldkamp.
On the matter of improved griev-
ance procedures, the University

War protest
(Continued from page 1)
Bill Hutchison, is organizing the
Michigan contingent. Participants
come from all over the state. The
largest segments are from Ann Ar-
bar and Saginaw with 50 each.
Onlyaa third of the group are stu-
dents.
On Monday, the schedule calls
for visits with Senators Phillip
Hart (D-Mich.) and Robert Grif-
fin (R-Mich.) and Michigan con-
gressmen. All will be presented
with letters and arguments de-
manding an end to the bombing
in Indochina. The group will then
hold a memorial service for the
war victims on the steps of the
Capitol Building

U of M SKI CLUB
MEETING
Information and Sign Up for
Christmas Trips to:
MONT. TREMBLANT, QUEBEC...... . .
Leave Jan. 1, 1972 Return Jan.

FREE BILLIARD
INSTRUCTION'
Thurs. 7-9 p.m.
Nov. 11 & 18
Michigan Union

TV& Ste e9 RentIs
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

Ii I

4

$165
1972
$350
1972

INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA
Leave Dec. 27, 1971
7:30 p.m.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Return Jan.
Room 3529 SAB

5,

might be more flexible than on Afterwards they will proceed
Grave LSSue wages or job descriptions,- from the Capitol to the front
(Continued from page 1) "We've got the capacity to re- gates of the White House. Hutchi-
spond there," said Feldkamp. Fur- son says they will request use of
would return with the wagon and thermore, Thiry pointed out that the White House grounds for the
Surprisingly enough, the Univer- a grievance procedure for em- protest. If denied admittance as
SurpwasinevyeoffghythaUnireployes not covered by the union all other delegations, the group
sity was never officially charged contracts already exists., will blanket the sidewalk adjacent
with breaking the law, although it- the front gate.
was implicated in a large number Thiry claimed, "any employe can Each member represents a Viet-
of cases and did not even keep its present any case of dissatisfaction namese killed that day; all will
activities secret. to the University and have it de- wear peasant hats and some black
According to Hanawalt, one of cided on its merits." He explained peasant garments.
the University's anatomy profes- that the dissatisfied employe should Locally, Patti Ricke is organiz-
sors made a full report to the Re- bring a complaint first to his or ing a Monday demonstration at
gents in 1869 stating that he "had her immediate supervisor, then, if the office of Rep. Marvin Esch (R-
to arrange and connive, and even agreement is not reached at that Mich.). The demonstration will
break the law," in order to obtain level, to the department head, and march under the sign "300 More
the cadavers necessary for anato- finally to the University Complaint Killed in Vietnam" and may lie
my labs. The professor subsequent- Review Committee, which is chair- down in front of the office.
ly requested a higher budget in ed by a member of personnel and
stolen bodi better prices for the includes the department head as he Original
In one documented case, the a member.
body of an Ohio man turned up PAUL CAMELET
in the University medical school,
and an anatomy professor refused THE ALLEY Dean Tailor
to release it to the family until for Men and Women
they had reimbursed him the $30 330 MAYNARD alterations and remodler, also
which he had paid for it. Then specialties in shortening ladies
University President James Angell ? coats, slacks, and skirts.
finally stepped in and returned the j NOLONGER WITH
stolen body to the family without P I-BALL
CAMELET BROS.
charge.
The grave problem began to NEW MACHINES in business for himself
dwindle in 1881, when the state NO 3-4381
legislature passed laws legalizing 11:30 A.M.-12 MIDNIGHT 321 S. MAIN
the use of cadavers by medical Whittaker Building
schools. 5 BALLS PER GAME No. 204
And by now it has totally dis __
appeared, according to medical
Prof. Thomas Oerlich of the anat
amy department, who is in charge N ow OPEN SUNDAYS
of anatomical donations. S DV~ A S
The anatomy department receives
about 5,000 signed statements per 12N to P
year from individuals declaring N
their intent to will their bodies for
Wekdysand Saturdays 8:30 -8:301
anatomical studies, Oerlich said'dJU
"and that number is getting larger
all the time."C
According to Oerlich, the dissec-
tion of human bodies has become naturl f estaurant
much more widely accepted than ; a u a o d r sa r n
it was in the 1800's-even the stu- 315 S. State
dents aren't really affected by it.,
"They may be a little queasy at
first; but after a while they realize
that it's just another human being
who happens to be dead," he said. BARNEY'S FRUIT & VEGETABLE STAND
S A RE APPLE CIDER 29c O9 W 77r

WOMEN'S CRISIS CENTER
IS OPENING
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15
2nd floor, Michigan Union
WALK-IN HOURS: 10 a.m.-midnite
TEMPORARY PHONE: 763-3241, 6 p.m.-8 a.m. starting Nov. 15
ALL WOMEN: TRAINING SESSION SUNDAY
9 a.m. in the Center
"Great even if you're not stoned
SND OHn BR
One Hight Only Before Chicago Opening

4

Tonight

Union Ballroom
TICKETS AT DOOR

7& 10

Good Food

The "Enormously Important Work"
by University of Michigan Law
School Professor Arthur R. Miller

Fish Fry $1.39
3O35 Washtenaw across frmm e Oldsmobile
-ADVERTISEMENT-
BARGAIN

c.
z
ondft
Y.
!d'

The Assault on Privacy
Computers, Data Banks,
and Dossiers
"The Assault on Privacy is an enor-
mously important book.... A well-
organized, tightly reasoned, and
thoroughly documented exploration
of the inroads already made by
computers on privacy - a pioneer
work in a field that has vital impli-
cations for the very character of our
people."
-Ramsey Clark, Saturday Review
$7.95

GODARD!
AT
Cinema Guild
NOV. 15-22

! uC#r COVR... Was I.L--VY //G
0 POMEGRANATES 25c & 35c-cheaper than in
the supermarket?
Other delectable fruits and vegetables,
including figs from Turkey
OPEN EVERY DAY BUT MONDAY

S.
&

University
E. University

Football Sats.,
State & Stadium

i

RELIGIONS
JEWELRY MANUFACTURERS do a very profitable business in imitation gold
crosses. It's human nature to hunt for bargains, even in religious items.
That's why so many people turn to religions that cost them little, modern cults
and isms that offer a comforting sense of God's nearness and do away with the
idea of hell entirely. It is only human to want a religion that de-emphasizes
punishment for sin. However, a bargain may have serious hidden flaws. The
thing you buy cheaply often turns out to be worthless.,
Genuine Christianity is not a cheap this is over and find out that I was
religion, although many offer bargains wrong?
in its name. It was a critical moment Yet Christianity is not a religion of
in history when Christ fear but of love. Fear may drive a man
READING had to tell His disciples to religion, but religion will drive fear
TIME what His proclamation of out of a man. To love God and be
2 Minutes the truth would cost Him: loved by Him makes heroes out of
20 Seconds crucifixion. Who wants to cowards, sober men out of alcoholics,
follow a defeated leader? responsible and creative men and wo-
Christ's offer was, "If any man will men out of floundering, undirected,
come after me, let him deny himself, confused human beings. Christianity is
and take up his cross daily, and follow not mere morality, it is commitment to
me." a person, the Lord Jesus Christ. The
Christianity is a religion of choice. price isn't cheap. It cost Christ His
The consequences of that choice are life; it will cost you your ego-filled
clearly set forth in the Bible. He who personality, your right to self-direction;
chooses Christ is reconciled with God, it will bring you into opposition with
born anew, assured, of eternal life. He the world.
who rejects Christ and chooses to con- But the cross was followed by the
tinue in the sin of a self-directed life resurrecton. When you take up the
condemns himself to trouble of soul, cross and follow Christ, your feet will
divorces himself from reality and ulti-- be set on a road that leads to joy,
mate purpose, and in the end suffers peace, released creativity, and related-
ness to what life is all about, here and
eternal loss, Even the most sophisticat- hereafter. The Christian life will cost
ed person is haunted at some time by you something, but it's worth it.cIts
the fear, What if I wake up after all joys surpass its sorrows. Try it.
"But how do I come to Christ?" you ask. "Where is He?" Let me send you
my free booklet, "WHICH SAVES?" to help you find Him. It can be secured
only by writing to
Box 327, Ridgefield, N.J. 07657, Dept. UM

Two Important New Paperbacks
NANCY ILIO
9226 Kercheval
The Storefront That Did Not Burn
This beautifully written account of
Detroit's Mom and Tots Center has
2?I.1iij peoplethmeot ot nhol
been called "the most important
° lbook about real flesh-and-blood
people to come out of the, whole
sorry nightmare of race relations in
America in the '60s." (Shane Stevens,
Life) $2.45

F.

1 I
, I
, I
1
Ii
I I
769-3400 1
1 I
I
1 I
M I
/
/i r r w rr w r r r I

Omega Pizza
The Better Pizza
People
will honor
all competitors' coupons
good thru Dec. 10

Trade Up To

Caprapd

M. R. DELANY and
ROBERT CAMPBELL
Search for a Place
Black Separatism and Africa, 1860.
Introduction by Howard H. Bell
"[Delany is] the founding father of
black nationalism in America...
there is always a special fascination
and significance in the 'father' of a
living movement, especially if, as in
[Delany's] case, he may be pecul-
iarly symbolic and symptomatic of
its entire course from his time to
ours." -Theodore Draper,
New York Review of Books
$2.25

world's finest automatic turntable

"Synchronously Powered"

$39.95

to $189.95

interested in finding a place to live in ISRAEL?
CHAVURAT ALIYAH
a group of college-age people seriously considering
going to Israel to live, meets regularly on U. of M.
campus to share information, ideas, problems, and
solutions regarding immigration and life in Israel.
NEXT MEETING-MONDAY, NOV. 15-8 P.M.
place to be announced-for information
CALL 665-4311 or 761-1687
-TON ITE-
Charles Gabriel
featuring
Pinkie Smith
Fine Food, Cocktails, .Dinner

I/i9 ?ide/iti WORKSHOP
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
2555 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor 665-3664
16400 W. 7 Mile Rd., Detroit BR 3-7985
"We Service What We Sell"
9 BANKAMERICARD 0 MASTERS 0 DINERS

i

iil

i -

__- - - - - --i i
,,

NOVEMBER 13-20, 1971

ii I

Emphasis

on

Women

-'

III

ov. 13: 9:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A
WOMEN'S ABORTION TEACH-IN
featuring guest speakers Florence Kennedy, Barbara Robb, Jean King and
Janet Wings. Special interest Workshops, film and discussion. Sponsored by
WONAC, for further information call Joyce Broughton, 971-6031

;i

Nov. 16:

11:00 a.m.-6:04 p.m., Michigan Union, 2nd floor

WOMEN'S INFORMATION FAIR
Sponsored by the Commission on Women to provide easy access to a broad
range of information concerning women's groups, employment, and ed. goals,.
in a festive setting. For further information call Sally Buxton, 763-2203
Nov. 17: 8:00 p.m., Undergraduate Library, Multi-Purpose Room
NATALIE DAVIS

Ii

Ili I

iiI

i

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan