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November 12, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 12, 1971

PageTenTHE iCHGAN AIL

PRO DRAFT HOPEFUL:
Beckmam

r

plugs

up

holes

ri

By RANDY CASWELL
The "pit" is the area occupied
Dy the offensive and defensive
lines. It is in this preciously small
irea that football games are ei-
ther won or lost.
Michigan's success this y e a r
has depended on the performance
>f such pit dwellers as defensive
tackle Tom Beckman.
Beckman is used to the abuses
of the pit, in high school he de-
voted most of his time to learning
the means of destroying his of-
fensive opponent.
His devotion paid off. In his
junior year Tom was besieged by
college football scouts, each prom-
ised him all sorts of lucrative of-
fers if he would attend their
school.
Beckman was impressed by the
Michigan scout's low key approach
And the Wolverines were impres-
sed by Tom's ability and desire.
Michigan promised him a scholar-
ship if his performance during
his senior year was as impressive
as hisperformance was in his jun-
ior year.
Beckman, from Chesaning, Mich-
igan, earned a berth on All-State
second team, and the Wolverines
offered him a tender which he
accepted.
When Fred Grambau injured his
knee and missed the entire 1970
season, Beckman came in off the
bench and guaranteed himself a
starting position through his ex-
ceptional performances during the
season.
Beckman's contributions this
year have helped establish t h e
Wolverines as the top defensive.
team in the nation, having yielded
less than five points a game.
The favoritism that the media

uses in such statistics and polls is
a thorn in Tom's side, "It's not thel
quality team that is recognized ins
the polls, it is the team that has
the best public relations depart-1
ment. In this business, like any1
other, selling yourself is a neces-
sity."
Mention sports coverage by ma-I
gabines in the Beckman home, and1
watch out. Tom's feeling towardsc
magazines is similar to the feel-
ing he gets when you mention last
year's Ohio State game.c
"Magazines' role is my gripe,t
they only stress the sensational as-

pects of a game." Beckman ramb-
led on, "The media has control
over athletics."
But he contends that this con-
trol will eventually revert b a c k
to the field, with the teams' over-
all performances being stressed.
Besides illuminating the media's
power in the sports world, foot-
ball has taught Tom how to really
communicate with people. He
pointed to the advantages of this
when he said, "Being able to co-
ordinate with a group in football
carries over into society."
Beckman believes that this co-

ordination develops the direction
or goal that every person should
have in life.
Tom plans to take his chances U
in the pro draft, and if t h a t
proves unsuccessful, he either will
teach, coach, or more probably,
go from his social science major
into graduate work aimed at an
athletic directorship.
Tom Beckman is a gifted ath-
lete, but more importantly for him,0
he is a sincerely concerned par-
ticipant when it comes to the pur-
pose and interaction between the
media, athletics, and the society.

HOOSIERS FAVORED:
Harriers seek Big Ten title

4

I

v

By DALE ARBOUR
On Saturday, Michigan's cross
country team travels to the snowy
plains of Minnesota for its first
Big Ten championship meet in
many years as an official team.
The University of Minnesota
will host the 54th Annual run-
ning of this meet. And although
temperatures may not exceed 20
degrees, the competition present
will be plenty hot. Defending
champion Michigan State brings
to Minneapolis a stronger team
than that which won a year ago.
However, Indiana University
handily beat this Michigan State
team in dual meet competi-
tion earlier this season, the score
being 23-35. Indiana is also owner
of a dual meet victory over Mia-
mi (0.) University, this year's

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
PRIDE OF THE "PIT", Michigan tackle Tom Beckman, puts the
stuff to an unfortunate Indiana ball carrier, in Michigan's 61-7
humbling of the Hoosiers. Beckman, wh' goes 6-5, 246 pounds

.
:

has been the main muscle behind
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Michigan's monstrous defense.
SEE
PAUL NEWMAN as
TH, FR, SAT, NOV.
11, 12, & 13

Mid-American Conference cham-
pion.
The Mid-American is consid-
ered by many coaches throughout
the country as the strongest cross
country conference in the coun-
try, so Indiana could possibly be
the best team in thedcountry.
Minnesota also can't be denied
a shot at the conference title
because, after all, they are the
hosts, and are most accustomed to
running through snow and cold as
early as October. Also, the esti-
mated 2,000 fans who will be on
hand for the meet will provide
them with strongly partisan sup-
port.
Minnesota's Garry Bjorklund
has been setting records left and
right since entering the Univer-
sity of Minnesota two years ago.
He is two-time defending cham-
pionsin individual Big Ten com-
petition, and under conditions he
is well accustomed to, he should
easily repeat this success.
But Minnesota's chances for a
team title this year were weakened
by graduation losses, which in-
cluded Don Timm, who had fin-
ished second to Bjorkland two
years in a row.
Michigan State also suffered
some graduation losses but these
were quite adequately filled by two
transfer students, Ron and Rob
Cool, from Grand Rapids Junior
College who have served in the
state's top five all season. They
have joined three juniors who all
placed in the top ten in last year's
Conference race.
Indiana has developed the most
powerful cross country team in
the Big Ten this year, thanks to

plenty of West Coast talent and
head coach Sam Bell, formerly of
the University of California at
Berkeley and Oregon State, where
he coached some very successful
teams. He is in his third year as
the head coach of the Indiana
team.
Seniors Steve Kelly and Bob
Somesan have been pacing Indi-
ana's efforts most of this seasond
and will be important men in
their bid for an 11th Big Ten
cross country title.
Michigan will enter this meet
in high spirits after defeating de-
fending national NAIA champion
Eastern Michigan last weekend by
six points. Freshman Keith Brow-
will be striving to place among
the top five individuals Satur-
day, a feat which only runners
such as Bjorklund usually ever
achieve as a freshman.
"If our team can finish as high
as fourth or better in this meet
then we will have achieved our$
major goal of the season", says
head coach, Dixon Farmer. He
goes on to say that "if this goal
is achieved, it will be a good in-
dicator of the quality of cross
country which should be preva-
lent at Michigan in the years to
come."
Making the trip to Minnesota
on the Michigan squad will be
freshman Mike Taylor, and a
cluster of sophomores including
Dave Eddy, Bill Bolster, Mike
Pierce, and Rick Schott. Seniors
Dale Arbour and Captain Ower*
MacBride round out the Michi
gan travelling squad.

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$2.75 341-0770

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17111 3rd-Detroit

Gridde Pickings
"What the hell's going on here!" snarled Snat Garnley. He
caught a down elevator and got off at Tashkent.
He didn't waste any time transforming himself directly to Kafka's
tent. "Allright, I demand an explanation Barls!"
Barely perceptible, Barls Fingerhook rolled his eyeballs insanely
in the shadows; he croaked, "You startled me Snat. I was just staring
at the flame of my candle."
Snat scratched his genitals vaguely. "I've got to know what's
going on, don't I Barls? I mean what the hell*. .."
"Yes, what the hell!" cackled Barls, "I'll just change the chan-
nel!" Click. "There we are. I just hate students."
Snat found himself quite removed from the situation. He kicked
a can down a street leading into the Dark Ages, whistling "Sweet
Georgia Brown."
"Maybe I can get a job at the Daily as a sportswriter . . ." he
mused.
If a simple story like this has got you confused, remember all
Gridde Picks should be in by midnight Friday at 420 Maynard St.
1. MICHIGAN at Purdue 12. Kentucky at Florida
2. Indiana at Iowa 13. Missouri at Iowa State
3. Minnesota at Mich. State 14. UTEP at New Mexico
4. Northwestern at Ohio State 15. Texas at Texas Christian
5. Illinois at Wisconsin 16. Air Force at Tulsa
6. Pitt at Army 17. Southern Illinois at
7. Auburn at Georgia Louisville
8. West Texas State at 18. Texas Agriculture and
Colorado State Mining at Rice
9. Pennsylvania at Columbia 19. University of Southern
10. Cornell at Dartmouth California at Washington
11. Duke at Wake Forest 20. Slippery Rock at Clarion State

i

I

IU

Ailing Knicks trade
for 'Earl the Pearl'

I

I

SPOIL YOURSELF IN
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NEW YORK (P) - Earl "The'
Pearl" Monroe, who issued a
trade-me-or-else ultimatum to the
Baltimore Bullets, got his way yes-
terday when he was acquired by
the New York Knicks in a multi-I
faceted transaction.
In order to acquire the unhappy
Monroe, who in four National
Basketball Association seasons has
reached superstar status, t h e
Knicks gave the Bullets forward
Dave Stallworth, guard Mike Rior-
dan and an undisclosed amount of
cash.
There, however, seemed to be
some confusion over whether the
deal had met with Monroes ap-
proval. Red Holzman, the Knicks
coach and general manager, said
he had not talked to Monroe but
had spoken to his agent and ack-

at 12.50.

0 VOLVAWAGEOf MC0'MC.U0.

nowledged "there are a few things
we have to iron out."
Asked how Monroe, who was
used by the Bullets primarily 9*
a one-on-one player, would fit
into a Knicks' pattern that relies
on precision team work, Holzman
replied:
"I don't think he's basically a
one-on-one player. He's basically a
basketball player and can adjust
to anything that has to be dol
on a basketball court. We know
he has great talent and we hope
to put it to use here."
Holzman, however, said he pro-
bably would. continue to s t a r t
Walt Frazier and Dick Barnett in
the Knicks' back-court, although
Monroe "has been working out and
he's supposed to be in shape."
Monroe said he was ready to
play for the Knicks in last night's
game against the Golden State's
Warriors gut "I don't expect to be
in the starting line-up right
away."
As for his problems with t h e
Bullets, Monroe sidestepped the
issue by saying: "I don't want
to talk about that - I'm just
happy to be here."
Monroe has a 23.7 career aver-
age. He was the NBA's Rookie il
the Year in 1967-68 when he aver-
aged 24.3 a game, then had his
best season the following year
with a 25.8 average. He slipped to
23.4 in 1969-70rand then felldoff
further last season.

For the student body:
.LEVI'S

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(All Colors)

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The VW Fastback.
The only car that gives you two
trunks for the price of one.
Drop by. We'll show you where the engine is.

Bells .......$8.50

DENIM
Bush Jeans . $10.00
Bells ........$8.00
Boot Jeans . $7.50
Pre-Shrunk . $7.50
Super Slims . $7.00
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

HOWARD COOPER VOLKSWAGEN INC.
Overseas Deliverv Available
2575 So. State St., Ann Arbor Phone 761-3200
Open Mon. & Thurs. till 9 P.M.

AUTHORIZED
D~EALER;

You are invited to hear
WILBUR COHEN, Dean
of Education, discuss with
the Unitarian Fellowship,
"Some Needed Changes
in Education"
TIME: 10:30 a.m. Sunday
PLACE: 502 West Huron
(Senior Citizens Guild).
DEAN COHEN IS A FORMER
SECRETARY OF HEW

moommmona

U

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CORRECTION

The Original
PAUL CAMELET

.. .,, a.,. 3 $ are,;. .. a ,. , t.. :, & '

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