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November 12, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Sias

-1 HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 12, 1971

Page Six iHE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, November 12, 1971

While the Frneze IsOn

Phase
'Continued rom 1),W0
mission said the regulati
be published by the end
week.
But Grayson conceded t
suiers may have a diffh
knowing when a price I

2 opens with price controls
1) ly lists of prices that were in effect Sunday. Firms will not be allowed
ons may during the freeze. to increase prices to get relief,
Sof the The price list must be posted iretroactively, for costs that might
Thepuc lit mst e pste fo 1have gone up during or before the
that co-all food items. For other retail e
sl timestuoes, a list of selected itemsr- freeze r
h~sben schas a product that does a high! Some prices could go up im-

CITE DANGERS Plea made
Blacks ask strike of

Ann Arbor schools

uttz) uvUll I

boosted legally in line with the v o 1 u m e of business--must be mediately Sunday, Grayson said. (Continued from page 1)
commissio's guidelines. posted. because a business could claim at the center at 8 a.m., not on th
Companies will be encouraged, Grayson said the detailed regu- that it began incurring new costs streets looking for trouble."
but not required, to show custo- lations on posting will be an-on that date. Classes will be held at the An
mers cost information that would 1 nounced soon. The price lists must The price guidelines will be po- Arbor Community Center, taugh
justify price increases in their be posted no later than Jan. 1,eliced under a complicated three- by some Model City staff, Univer
stores, he said- 1972, he said. tier economic system announced sity students, and other volunteer
But the commission threw in a Wednesday. for the duration of the strike.
provision that may prevent a t The price guidelines cover only In the incident yesterday, polic
quick upswing in retail prices im- the period that begins Sunday, Price boosts that may be an- reported that Julie Callison, 15,
mediately after the freeze ends. Nov. 14. Prices may be increased nounced by the nation's largest was stabbed repeatedly in the leg
All retail prices will remain to recover only those increased companies will be frozen for at yesterday morning by a group o
frozen until stores post prominent- I costs incurred after 12:01 a-m. least another month. black youths who chased her ou
r.- -- - ---- - --- :-i

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SWite,'

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Empl
i

NOVEMBER 12-20, 1971

from

hasis

on

Women

:II

$26

Nov. 12:

Nov. 13:

I

t

Nov. 16:

at
306 S. State

8:00 p.m., St. Andrews Church, 306 N. Division
WOMEN'S NIGHT
Multi-media slide show, Ann Arbor Dance Theater, Detroit Women's Street
Theater, & "The Woman's Play" by the Street Corner Society. Sponsored
by WONAC, for further information call Joyce Broughton, 971-6031
9:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A
WOMEN'S ABORTION TEACH-IN
featuring guest speakers Florence Kennedy, Barbara Robb, Jean King and
Janet Wings. Special interest Workshops, film and discussion. Sponsored by
WONAC, for further information call Joyce Broughton, 971-6031
11:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Michigan Union, 2nd floor
WOMEN'S INFORMATION FAIR
Sponsored by the Commission on Women to provide range. Easy access to
a broad range of information concerning women's groups, employment, and
ed. goals, in a festive setting, for further information call Sally Buxton, 763-
2203
8:00 p.m., Undergraduate Library, Multi-Purpose Room
NATALIE DAVIS
professor of History, University of Toronto, Speaking On:
URBAN WOMEN & THE REFORMATION
2nd lecture in the series, Women In Perspective, sponsored by Center for
Continuing Education of Women, for further information call 764-5555,
764-0449
First National Womens March on Washington
purpose:rrepeal anti-abortion laws, against forced sterilization and restric-
tive contraception laws. Bus leaving Ann Arbor Nov. 19, 7:00 p.m., from
SAB. Call 662-5400 for information.

of the main school building. The
e youths were reportedly driven off
by a white parents brandishing a
n hammer.
t Callison was released from St.
- Joseph Mercy Hospital after treat-
s ment.
Arrested at a confrontation be-'
e hind the school were eight blacks
5sven of them students at Pioneer
s and one. Mrs. Shirley Gulley. aged
f 29. a human relations worker with.
t the school board.
At a press conference yester-
day afternoon, city school super-
intendent R. Bruce McPherson
told newsmen that in addition to
those arrested yesterday, the
school system would seek warrants
for eleven Huron High students
allegedly involved in racial inci-
dents at that school, and would'
attempt to identify and prosecute
the students involved in the as-.
sault on Callison.
McPherson vowed to "keep the'
schools. open" and promised that
he would use police to enforce thisI
policy.
"We will not permit a small'
minority of students, black and
white,to deprive the majority of
students . . . of an education," a
McPherson told reporters.
"We are taking firm and clear]
action against all identified of-1
fenders."
tlop science
expert dies
A world-renowned scientific au-
thor, medical educator and re-
searcher, Dr. Bradley M. Patten,
Ph.D., died here Monday.
Patten, an emeritus professor,
retired in 1958 after 22 years as.
chairman of the department an
anatomy.
He is survived. by his. wife, Bar-
bara; a daughter, Elizabeth Gar-
rey, and four grandchildren.

on pot law
In support of lowered mari-
juana penalties, state Senator
Basil Brown (D-Warren) yester-
day read before the state Senate
a statement written by John Sin-
clair, currently serving a 91/2 to
10 year sentence for possession of
two marijuana cigarettes.
According to Rainbow People's
Party member David Fenton,
Brown was attempting to sway the
Senate toward lower penalties for
the possession of marijuana.
Last week the Senate passed a
bill retaining felonious penalties
for possession of marijuana. This
summer, however, the state house
passed a more lenient bill which
would make marijuana possession
a misdemeanor. A joint house-
senate committee will begin meet-
ing next week to arrive at some
compromise between the bills.
"All we can conclude," reads
part of Sinclair's 4-page state-
ment, "is that you are not inter-
ested in justice, that you have no
interest in bringing the 'law' into
conformance with reality, that
your interest is simply to use
marijuana laws vindictively to
punish those - people who don't
share your dinosaur's-eye view of
the world."
In an unusual action, state Sen-
ator L. Harvey Lodge(C R-Water-
ford) moved to strike the state-
ment from the Senate record be-
cause it was an affront to the dig-
nity of the Senate, according to
Fenton.
The Senate overruled Lodge's
objection, however, and allowed
the record to stand.
i-

4

i.
iii

I

Nov. 17:

BABSON COLLEGE
(WELLESLEY, MASS.)
Graduate M.B.A. Program
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
Monday, November 15, 1971-3-5 p.m.
by Mr. M. D. Pell
' Sign-u-p: Career Planning and Placement Center

Nov. 20:

Daily Classifieds Get Results

1
I

3 , I

----------

........ . ... .. .

AT YOUR SERVICG
The Housing Office feels that all students should be free to concentrate
academic (and other) pursuits without added worry of dietary requiremer

on
its.

a

Therefore, University Residence Halls offer "Optional Me a
any University student.
* available at all Halls

I

Contracts" for

4

* select one convenient location
* initiate or cancel contract at your request
* select lunch, or dinner, or both

4

* reasonable prices (lunch and dinner meal contract for a year would cost
$2.91 a day). Re-serves on nearly all foods. Salad bars, soft drinks, and soft
serve ice cream available for both meals.

CATCH 22-not really, but we should mention that there are
specified dining hours at each residence.

I

III

I

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