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November 12, 1971 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-12

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BOX OFIES OPN 6:0

-NEWS PHONE: 764-0532
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0534

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THE TOWERING TRIUMPH OF ADULT MOVIES!
TRADER HORNEEX
Rated X for Adults . .. F for Funny ...
Shown Nightly at 7:00 & 10:30
PLUS
The Definite Film of the Newly Found Freedom of th'e
ScenWeekdays 8:5-Fri -St 845 & 12:00

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, November 12, 1971

news briefs
By The Asiocsated Press

Ui.S. BOMBING INTENSIFIED

FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
$2.50 PER CARLOAD

3 Adult Features
"TH E MINX" x
"T:HE FEMALE"s
"BORA BORA"
Free passes to the car wi

GIMME SHELTER GP
ENDLESS SUMMER G
-SAT. NIGHT-
Early & Late, Late Show-
th 10:30C& see all 3 features
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Subscribe to Te Daily
"'SUNDAY, BLOODY SUNDAY' is Schlesinger's ('Darling,'
'Midnight Cowboy') wisest, least sentimental film, and al-
most perfect realization of Penelope Gilliatt's original
screenplay . . . Miss Gilliatt has the extraordinary ability
to create intelligent characters who don't sound like mouth-
pieces, to capture those looks and sounds of the surface of
things that suggest the universes just beneath, and to write
dialogue that is simultaneously rueful and funny, and as
spontaneous as love itself. It's a movie of unusual tensions
and reserves .. . 'SUNDAY, BLOODY SUNDAY' opened yes-
terday at the Coronet Theatre, where, I'm sure, it will
remain for a long, long time."
-Vincent Conby, NEW YORK TIMES
AJoseph Janni prdcto John Schlesinger's Film
B___dySunday"
SM T W TF S

PRESIDENT NIXON announced yesterday he is replacing his
embattled Secretary of Agriculture and abandoning a plan to
abolish the Agriculture Department that was not popular in the
farm belt.
Nixon told newsmen that 56-year-old Clifford M. Hardin is
leaving the cabinet to take "an exceptionally attractive offer" from
a private firm.
Hardin, the fifth original member of the Nixon Cabinet to leave
his post, will be succeeded - if the Senate agrees - by Earl Butz,
62, who was an assistant secretary of agriculture in the Eisenhower
administration.
SENATE AND HOUSE negotiators agreed yesterday on a
compromise plan of federally supported day care for the nation's
children, ending a deadlock of almost a month.
Under the Senate bill, free day care and other services would
be given to children from families with incomes of up to $4,320
a year.
The compromise represented a major concession to the Nixon.
Administration, which had threatened to veto a far more liberal
day-care plan approved by the Senate earlier this fall.
* *, *
SEN. HENRY JACKSON said yesterday he believes in inte-
gration "in the fullest sense" but ,objects to school busing which
would move his children to slum area schools from their "lily
Iwhite neighborhood."
Jackson, an unannounced contender for the Democratic presi-
dential nomination, told a group of party contributors in Washing-
ton, D.C., that the answer to the busing problem is to provide equaL
schools for all neighborhoods.
New York Mayor John Lindsay and Sens. Hubert Humphrey
and Edmund Muskie also talked to the gathering of campaign givers.
during the day-long meeting.
THE LEADERS of the People's Republic of China's first
permanent delegation to the United Nations arrived at Kennedy
airport yesterday.
Deputy Foreign Minister Chiao Kuan Hua was greeted by UN
delegates from Zambia, Albania and Pakistan and UN chief of
Protocol, Sinan Korle.
Chiao read a statement, declaring, "Our delegation will work
jointly in the United Nations with the representatives of all the:
countries that love peace and uphold justice for the cause of safe-
guarding the international peace and promoting human progress.''
THE HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS Committee yesterday re-
jected a measure that would tack a June 1 deadline on all U.S.

Laos
.By THOM MARLOWE
@Pacific News Service
Vientiane, Laos - "What's
happening in Laos?" a curious
Vientiane-bound traveller asked
his companion.
"Who knows?" was the reply.
They are not the only ones in
the dark. For -the 800,000 to one
million refugees - approximate-
ly one-third of the country's
populationh - logic in Laos is a
Certainly, to thousands of
people who used to live on the
Plain of Jars life seems a good
deal less than reasonable. They
are now living in a dusty arid
area less than 30 miles from
Vientaine, administrative capi-
tol of the Royal L aotian Gov-
board shacks.
These refugees were evacuat-
ed from their homes more than
Lao soldiers, undera theaegi of
the U.S., and were promised
farmland and food until the
first crop would be harvested.
In addition, they were told,
their Pathet Lao-issued money
would be exchanged for Govern-
ment iKips when they got to
Why then, many ask, will
there be no first crop, and why
is there no suitable farmland?
And why are they still trying,
unsuccessfully, to e x c h a n g e
their Pathet, Lao money for
Kips? .
The displaced civilian popula-
tion of Laos has a slanted view
of what has happened to it, ac-
cording to Jack Williamson,
Deputy Director of Refugee Re-
national Development (US -D)
"A lot of them feel they are-
being lpicked on," Williamson
mainUSAD compound in Vien
tiane. They feel that they are
the only ones being pushed
around. They don't see the
whole picture or understand the
picture throughout Southeast
Asia."
On the whole, though, U.S.
officials are reluctant to discuss
the refugee problem. Some re-
fuse to admit that a problem
exists.
A common complaint of the
refugees is that they were
bombed out of their villages.

refuge es

face

perils

NAPALM DROPPED by U.S. planes burned this Laotian child, according to Fred Branfman, a
free-lance journalist who spent several years in Laos. In a recent appearance here, Branfman of-
fered this photograph to support his assertion that, contrary to claims by military officials, civilians
are suffering from continued U.S. bombing.

combat anu support operations in Indocnina to a $7 i Diion
defense bill.
The deadline was proposed by Rep. Edward Boland Jr. (D-Mass.).,
Boland said an effort will now be made to write it into the measure
when it reaches the House flOor next week.

"I approve every bomb strike
myself." said Ambassador God-
ley, a large jovial looking man.
"And I certainly don't condone
the bombing of villages."
The complaints of refugees
underscore a recently released
study of the air war in Indo-
china done by a Cornell Univer-
sity team of professors. They
concluded that bombing in Laos
remains at a level ecqual to one
four years ago while ground
cmbat has been drastically cur-
tailed.
Claims of increased bombing
are false, according to U.S. am-
bassador G. McMurtrie Godley.
When asked about Phantom
Jets which had been flying
over the royal capital of Luang
Prabang, the commander of the
first military region Brigadier
General Tiao Sayavong replied,
"There are no U.S. jets bomb-
ing in this area of Laos."
''The planes you have seen,"
the General announced from
his headquarters near the scen-
ic mountain capital, "are all on
their way to North Vietnam,"
About an hour later, a group
of three Phantoms dropped na-
palm several kilometersv ay
for comment.
One point on which both Lao
and American officials agree is
that about one million people

are still living in areas being
bombed; areas comprising two-
thirds of the country.
But agreement is; unfortun-
ately not always available. Asked
about the bombing of Sam
Neua in the north, the director
of U.S. Information Service in
Laos stated that there had been
no bombing of that area of
northern Laos for several
years.
Several days later, the Penta-
gon announced that it had been
conducting intensive bombing
over northern Laos for the past
several years.
One point on which most au-
thorities agree is that the Meo
Tribesmen, who no one suspects
of being Pathet Lao, and about
300,000 of whom are, now settlesi
in Ban San, have suffered ca-
tastrophic losses in the war. An
estimated 50 per cent of the
Meo men have died thus far.
.The result of the decimation
is that many of the soldiers in
Van Pao's CIA-backed mercen-
ary army, and the Royal Lao
Army, too, are children.

There are no children in the
Army according to a spokesman
f~or the Lao Defense Ministry
"There is no one unde'r 18 years
of age in -our armed forces,"
he stated. But a lieutenant in
yang Vien had a different story
to tell.
"Some of the children In my
company are so young that they
cannot carry a weapon," he ex-
plained. The lieutenant has been
with Van Pao two years and is
a Thai mercenary. His words are
backed up easily - adolescent
soldiers are plainly visible any-
where one travels in Laos.
Meanwhile, the ruling class of
Laos lives well on U.S. spoils
and has all the playthings of
the rich. Kids drive fancy
sportscars, while their parents,
are taken to the plush, air-con-
ditioned Lao-Bowl Center a
mile from towhn in chauffeur-
driven Mercedes. Only occasion-
ally does a refugee find his way
into Vientaine to mar the lush
town's illusion of prosperity.

MARINER 9 sailed closer and closer to Mars yesterday
while scientists awaited the first television pictures that might

Glenda Jackson Peter ~ich
with Iegy Ashcroft Tony Brirton Maurice Denham Bessie Love Vivian Pickles
Screenplay b~y Penelope Gilliatt roduced ty Joseph Janrn
RDirected by John Schlesinger Usnd Artsss

help to reveal some of the mysteries that surround the planet.
Scientists expect the photographs to be the first to show the. The Michigan Daily, edited and man.-
planet more clearly than it can be seen .through earth telescopes. agdnystent th e 76University of
* * Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
THE FOOD AND DRUG Administration announced yester- igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,.
day the recall of 87 tons of corn meal mix allegedly containing Michiga ro48104 Published daily Tues-
aflatoxin, a cancer causing substance produced by mold. sityer.ii subscription rates: $10 by
The ecaledproducts are Lil Lulu self-rising white cornmeal sarrier$1b masionul. se edy
mix enriched, and Morrison's Corn Kits prepared corn bread mix, through Saturday morning. subacrip-
both produced by Morrison Milling Co. of Denton, Texas. tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Daily Classifieds Get Re sults
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O ~;P~TH ~'Or'UM
FIFTH AVENUE AT LIBERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 761.9700

FRI. 7@89@ I i
Sat. 3@e 5@e7@ 9
Late Show Sat. 11

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6~
6 J
;rV

THRU TH4E

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
PRESENTS - f~.
DONO VAN
in concert.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19,38:30 p.m.-
Bow en Field House -
TICKETS-$3.50, $4.50, $5.50
Avtailable at
* McKenny Union Ticket Office
* Ann Arbor Music Mart, Liberty St.
* Michigan Union

.4

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
ANNOUNCES A LECTURE BY
hstorian RONALD RADOSH
ON HIS NEW/ BOOK
Conservative Critics of the American Empire
Saturday, November 13
Time: 4:30 p.m. Place: 411 Mason Hall
EVERYONE INVITED

STUDENTS OF SCHOOL
OF MUSIC
Present
J.S. BACH

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CONCERTOS
Ma'ilyn Mason-harpsichord
Howard Leyton-Brown-violin
Grover Wilkins Ill,-conductor
U REFORMED CHURCH
Tues., Nov. 1 6--8 P.M.
Gen'l Adm. $1.00 Stu. 50c.

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U

U

and Ann Arbor City Music Productions
present in concert
Buddies in the Saddle'
and
'Carnal Kitchen'
SA T LIfw/I 1' 0.2fl.

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ARM University of Michigan Film Society
Claude Chabrol's thriller

U

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