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November 11, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PageEigh THEMICHGAN AIL

Group asks Health Service fee,
shift to Medical Center control

CHANGE S SEEN
Old SGC elections: Any

(Continued from page 1) ,
direct Health Service closer to
the Medical Center, he stressed
there should be a "fair amount of
student input" concerning Health
Service policies.
Besides Knauss and Anderson,
the committee included Medical
Prof. Solomon Axelrod, Edward
Connors, director of University
Hospital, Medical School Dean
John Gronvill, David Heebinck,
assistant vice president for state
relations and planning, and Neil
Weinberg, '71, a de facto mem-
ber who served as a staff assist-
ant.
Medical Prof. Thomas DeKorn-
feld - one of the two SACUA
members given copies of the re-
port - said he was "not wildly
enthusiastic" about the recom-
mendations, but called the report
"a good starting point". He agreed
that the Health Service adminis-
tration should align more closely
with the Medical Center but said

x
t
k
c
f
r
t
t
1
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t

sire ruins t
city buildings
(Continued from page 1)
a raging inferno. The entire roofs
soon went up in the eonflagara-l
tion.
At one point, flames shot overs
35 feet into the night air. TheJ
Greyhound Bus Terminal textc
door and County Jail in back ofc
the building were at varinusk
times threatened, but neither
caught fire. Phone service was
cut to the jail and sheriffs con-s
sidered evacuating prisoners be-f
cause of the heavy smoke andt
heat.
Fire Chief Arthur Stauch gem-i
ployed 35 fire fighters and sevenv
pieces of equipment to fight ther
blaze. Firemen stationed on aerialt
ladders as well as on the ground
poured water on the burning roof.
Chief Stauch estimated that one
million gallons of water were used
to drown the fire, and in many
lower floor rooms later, this water
was one foot in depth.
The street and sidewalks around
the building were still cordoned
off yesterday afternoon by police
because officers at the scene said,
pieces of the structure were falling
to the street.
The Municipal Court Building
housed a variety of small busi-
nesses as well as offices, but theE
Municipal Court, for which the
building was named, moved to
Ann Arbor City Hall several years
ago. At one time the structurea
contained the Masonic Temple and
the Ann Arbor Savings Bank.
One of the current tenants, Jack
Garris, a local attorney who ran
for mayor last spring and was de-
feated, claimed that he lost "23
years of work" in the fire. His
second floor office was one of those
damaged by water.
The fire destroyed over 50 per
cent of the structure.

he hopes that "student input will
be intensified."
The second recommendation -
the mandatory fee-promises to
be more potentially explosive. Stu-
dents have in the past reacted
strongly against imposed fees-
such as the $5 assessment to pay
for Crisler Arena.
The present fee structure also
provides an obstacle to such an
assessment. While many univer-
sities have specific fees for certain
services, students here pay a lump
sum - tuition - which includes
many items.
Certain fees-such as the one-
time refundable bookstore fee, the
$16 football ticket charge, and
laboratory fees for certain science
and physical education courses-
are assessed in addition to tuition,
but not for every student every
term.
.According to Knauss, however,
there may be an opposite trend-
towards separating the University
tuition fee into components. If
this is the case, the mandatory
health service fee could be the
first step towards that system.
The present health insurance
scheme is a third obstacle to im-
plementing this fee. SGC current-
ly arranges a student health in-
surance policy based upon the
Health Service fee scale.
About 40 per cent of -University
students subscribe to this plan, ac-
cording to SGC Executive vice-
,president Jerry Rosenblatt. He
conjectured that the other 60 per
cent of the students were covered
by their. parents' or their own pri-
vate health insurance plans and
would thus object to being as-
sessed a mandatory health service
fee which would not benefit them
to any great extent.
Present Health Service funding
includes $1,227,638 from the Uni-
versity's general fund. About $15
per student-somewhat under half
the General Fund allotment-is
For the student body:
it FLARES
by
A- Levi
SFarah
Wright
Lee
Male
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty.

taken from student fees each term,
according to Knauss, while opera-
tional revenues bring in another
$600,000.
Health Service's pro-rated cost
for 1969-70 was $21.75 per student
term, according to the planning
committee's report. Costs are dif-
ficult to analyze, however, since
some services are provided free,
while other services; such as the
gynecology, allergy, or dentistry
clinics charge fees.
The usual charge for a visit to
any of the specialty clinics is, $5,
which under the mandatory fee
plan, would be eliminated. SGC
health insurance presently covers
some of these specialty clinic visits
at a per-student cost of $48 an-
nually. Student families are also
eligible for insurance under SGC
rules, whereas their eligibility un-
der the report's guidelines is un-
clear.
Anderson. speculated that the
proposed fee would probably be
about $20 per term, which he said
compares similarly with fees at
the University of Minnesota and
P u r d u e University, both large.
state-controlled midwestern uni-
versities.
Another plan considered "of in-
terest" in the report is Yale Uni-
versity's recently instituted com-
prehensive health care plan, which
includes the entire Yale commun-
ity, and which could cost some-
what more than $20 per student
per term.
A problem in implementing such
a plan here is the University com-
munity's huge size-estimated by
the committee at 108,000-when
employes and their families are
included along with students and
their families.

(Continued from page 1)
decided that total campaign spend-
ing for each presidential candidate
could not exceed a limit of $100
for any reason.
The experience of last year's
campaign seems to indicate that
it will be more difficult to get
away with overspending violations.
Presidential candidate Bill Thee
at that time was fined $80.64 for
campaign spending exceeding the
maximum set by SGC in the elec-
tion code.
"Bill Thee in any other year
could have gotten away with what
he wanted," Wilson said. "He may
have been challenged, but nothing
could have been proved."
Former election director Victor
Gutman said that confidence in
C&R has increased because of its
more active role in investigating
and redressing recent election vio-
lations.
C&R this year has not yet had
to face the types of major elec-
tion problems which have been
encountered in the past-and elec-
tions take place Nov. 16 and 17.
After three sessions, C&R ruled
to leave the form of the ballot un-
changed, denying an appeal asking
that periods be inserted in an ab-
breviated name on the ballot.
But although nothing major has
come up yet, committee member
Jeff Lewin said, "the crucial is-
sues of campaign spending and
election violations probably won't
surface until early next week."
Another procedural p r o b le m
which has plagued previous elec-
tions is the opportunity for "stuff-
ing the ballot."
One former SGC vice presiden-
tial candidate stated that SGC
elections were once "nothing more

than contests between who could
stuff the most ballots."
The same observer, however,
said of the present election situa-
tion that the elimination of hand-
counted ballots "had severely lim-
ited the ability of elections to be
rigged."
One of the m.ethods of "stuffing"
which has not yet been resolved
concerns the marking of voters' ID
cards. Under the present system,
each student's card is marked with
a felt-tip pen when he votes. Un-
fortunately, such a mark can be
easily erased, allowing any student
to vote more than once.
Suggestions on how to settle this
question have ranged from mailed
ballots to embossing the ID cards
the way the University does when
a student registers, but the old
method remains, at least for this
election.
Tampering with ballots by per-
sons staffing poll booths has long
been a bone of contention among
candidates and a hindrance to the
election procedure. Last March's
presidential election, however, wit-
nessed active poll watching by
both the political left and s.he right.
Having the polls outside reduces

i
t
f
7
I
l
7

1
i
l

I hursday, November 11, 197 1
DAILY OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
thing goes. BULLETIN
the opportunity for ballt fraud, aco. ......... W ailing rGodo
according to Nelson, making the THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11 is SOLD OUT
entire voting process 'nore visible. Psychiatry Lecture: B. Peretz, U. of
Ky., "The Aplysia Gill as a Model for
Another motive for this is to make Neurobiological Studies," 1057 Mental
,more people aware of voting, which Hlth. Res. Inst., 3:45 pm.
has been erratic in past Y-ars. Nuclear Seminar: G. Bertsch, MSU,
Voter response is very much de- "The Alpha-Particle Model," P&A Col-
pendent on issues in any election, luum m, 4 pm.
according to one former courcil Speech Dept. Performance: "The __
Rope", and "Three People," Arena The-_ =-
member. This is borne out by the atre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 pm. P
extremely large percentage turn-, International Center: Internat'l Tea;
out in the November, 1969, election everyone welcome; cider, coffee, and
on which voters approved over- donuts served, Internat'l Ctr., 4:30-6
m awh Incontrast to that turnou InternationalNight: German food, SEATS AVAILABLE FOR.
ich. League cafeteria, 5-7:15 pm.
of about 30 per cent of the student Computing Ctr. Short Course: T.N
body, only about 10 per cent voted Schriber, "Introduction to Modeling
in last November's mid-year elec- Discrete Systems with GPSS," 146 Bus.
tion. Ad., 7 pm.
- ---Undergrad Political Science Assoc,:
"Career Opportunities for Political Sci-
OY anization Notices ence Majors," Placement. Ofd., 3rd fl.,E
Oraizto N tc s A, 7:30 pm. DC 1-4-O E
Polish Club, Nov. 11, 6:30 PM 3532 Music School: String Dept. Recital,
SAB,. Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 8 pm. . Trueblood Box Office4
Gay Liberation open meeting, Nov. International Coffee Hour: Rive open 12:30-8:00
8:30 PM, Union, 3rd Floor, SGC work- Gauche, 1024 Hill St., 9 pm.
room.
Christian Science Organization, Nov.
11, 7:15 PM, 3545 SAB, All are welcome. ~'
India Students Association, Nov. 13,[
6:30 PM, Nov. 14, 6:30 PM, A Hindi ( '-4
Movie "Jewel Thief, Residential College Gay Colors
(East Quad) Auditorium.
Graduate Outing Club, Nov. 14, 1:30 '
PM, Meet at Huron St. entrance to
Rackham. Hiking at. Kensington Park.
SVELOURS
TOPS and PANTS
SA LE
)ING LOBBY
d Friday
11 and 12
04:00 ANN ARBOR
Very Low Prices . U.n versity

BOOK
FRIEZE BUILD
Thursday a
November.
10:001t

Used and New

Monthl
NT__ * COUGH & COI
CONTAC 20s

!y Madness,
ALE

STOCK UP 1
Some quantities
Sale ends Nover
ks
P0
B V
. jar Va
1.19
Fmar

LD REMEDIES

12-hour cold capsule
reg. $2.69

NOW $1,89

CONTAC 40s

---- 12NOW 2.9

reg. $4.95

1'/ 6F/
MENTHOL-EUCALYPTUS
DUAL ACTION*COUGH DROPS
VICTORS
NOW
reg.2

$jnX
NASAL
SPRAY
..' x..

SINEX
nasal
spray
$-99
1 oz.

Vic
VA
RU
3.1-02
Reg.
NC
$1

CECIL

TAYLOR

plus ANDREW CYRILLE and JAMES LYONS
SAT., NOV. 13 - 10 p.m.-3 a.m.
SUN. - Mat. 4 pm., evening 9-12
$2.75 341-0770
Ibo 17111 3rd-Detroit

----' 4
\-0 NIpN4
l s Idill
\
\
\\y'
\ . .
i l c
.. ,
,. 1
\'

NYQUIL
Night-time cold
medicine

10-oz.
Reg.
$2.15

NOW
$1.59

1L

BEAUTY AIDS
ALBERTO HOAFTER
vo HOUR
'f1\ nCr~nnDAMT

VICKS
FORMULA 441
6-oz.
EXTRA STRENGTH y.
cough mdcne
NOW
reg.
$1.98$1

4
NOW
s limited
mber 24.
ICKS
IpoRlb
$ ON
,ORMUZ
44H
IXu N UIE
SALE
PRICE
X399
$399
$229
JSH
9
DS
reg.
.43
6 tablets
26c
E

If you...
... dig crafts as a way of life,'
... are blessed with a pair of
working hands-
. .. are fed up with the
. , . are turned off by in-
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like the idea of making
jewelry for a living,
P .you may qualify as an apprentice in
Philip Morton's Jewlery & Silversmithing
Apprentice Program
PHILIP MORTON CONTEMPORARY JEWELRYO
112 W. WOOSTER, BOWLING GREEN, OHIO 43402
Write or Phone 353-9932 for information
- >o < --I0<0<-->o<-->o>o< }0<- -- <=>

VAPORIZER SPECIALS
SALE
PRICE
NORTHERN-1-Gal.-Reg. $12.95$
COLD STEAM VAPORIZER_$
NORTHERN-i1'/-Gal-Reg. $1 7.95
COLD STEAM VAPORIZER $1300
NORTHERN-2-Gal.-Reg. $19.95
COLD STEAM VAPORIZER $1400

J \\\'

UhiUR~IU

nil

BEO'4,1
SHAMPOO\I
ACRAS L 1

SHAMPOO
135-oz.
Reg. 89c
NOW
X69

11

BRAND NAME VITAMIN SP

8-oz.
Reg. $1.39
NOW
$ 3

SQUIBB-Reg. $7.89
TH ERAGRAN

M 100+30

PARKE-DAVIS-Reg. $6.60
MYADEC 100+30

NORTHERN-1-Gal.-Reg. $6.95
HOT STEAM VAPORIZER

$ 375

Trade up to
' -i
Pa
M i-.-:. .n~an^.+..+P f4c+

MARANTZ
Bring in your
components for
<v < best trade-in
terns available

v

11

Alberto
v 0~LUSTRE CREME
-SHAMPOO 101/4 oz.
16-oz
Hair Spray Reg.
regular and $1.50
hard to hold
reg.$1.59 Itre\
NOW NOW Grene
129I.99 s-'

UPJOHN-Reg. $3.03
UNICAP M 90+30

UPJOHN-Reg.
UNICAP

NORTHERN ELECTRIC
HEATING PADS
Your 25I OFF
Selection

STAY FREE 30s CHLORASEPTIC
Reg. .98 .ll 12-Oz. Reg. $1.98 $133
NOW NOW

*HEALTH NEEDS.
EFFERDENT 60s
UsERINE Reg. $1.49
NOW
LISTERI NE
Mouthwash
20 Oz. Reg. $1.49
~ NOW

TEK TOOTHBR
FAULTLESS RUBBER GOO
Fountain Syringes,
Hot Water Bottles, etc.
20% OFF
jDow rwith Fever
STJOSEPHII
A1 I i0f00CMN0.0R11
RtemmaM~f by oct4

$3.11
100+30 ........

it

4

PHISOHEX

LAVORIS

16 oz.
Reg. $2.89
NOW

MOUTH-
WASH
1A d -

MODELS FROM $199.95 TO $1000

a IP&IC~II

tM~a'l fIIrf-Mi KNI 1 U. l!1Imo ' .- - '% I E t.

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