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November 11, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 11, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN QAILY Thursday1 November 11, 1971

What's Wpe
and IWhre

,7

Campy and gang power Baby Blue.

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Fr te stud n body:
Genuine
>& Authentic
r Navy
$25
Sizes 34 to 50Q
eStreet at Liberty

If you have an item of interest, place it
in THE DAILY CALENDAR folder 48
hours in advance.
420 MAYNARD
Bu ltin Boa rd

By JIM EPSTEIN
When conversation turns to
basketball this winter the center
of attention may not be the ex-
ploits of the varsity cagers
against their rivals, Marquette,
Notre Dame, et al.
The object of all the talk may
well turn out to be the freshman
basketball team and their anni-
hilations of such harmless op-
ponents as Flint Junior College
and Auburn Hills Community
I College.
This year's freshman crop
boasts six highly regarded pros-
pects, who are well balanced
by position, a rarity on most
first year squads. The most
highly touted of the tendered
sextet is 6-7 Campy Russell, a
high school All-American from
Pontiac Central.
Russell, sought by numerous
colleges from all over the coun-
try; has already begun to live
up to his advance notices in
practice sessions and in a scrim-
mage against the varsity.
Freshman coach Dick Honig
appeared quite satisfied with
Russell's showing in early prac-
tice. "He is every bit as good as
his rating," said Honig. "He is
a very good defensive player, a
very good passer and an excel-
lent shooter."
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Honig compared the 6-7 for-
ward to the last Russell to play
at Michigan, Cazzie, presently of
the Golden State Warriors. "He
is as good as Cazzie was. He has
better speed and better size."
Doug Ashworth, a 6-6 forward
from Xenia, Ohio, will also
start up front. Ashworth was
named to the all-state team last
year and over his three seasons
of high school competition av-
eraged 18 points and 14 re-
bounds per game.
In addition to his boarding
prowess Ashworth is an accom-
plished defensive player, accord-
ing to Honig one of the best
he has seen at Michigan.
Joe Johnson, a 5-11 guard
from Kettering High School in
-Detroit, is Honig's choice for
field general and will act as
trigger man on the Wolverine
Stack offense.
The stack, is designed to get
the ball to Russell at least 40
per cent of the time, and most
of the time the pass should be
from Johnson. "If Campy is
going to score, Joe is going to
be responsible for it," asserted
Honig.
John Kantner will start at the
other guard position and should
become the big outside shooter
in of the backcourt tandem.
Averaging over 36 points per
game asa senior last year, the
6-2 deadeye led all Ohio cagers
in scoring.
Bill Ayler, a 6-4 Detroiter,
will swing between forward and
guard for the Baby Blue this
year with his great jumping
ability more htan compensating
for his lack of height.
A late arrival to basketball

workouts is 6-8 C.J. Kupec, the
Most Valuable Player in the
Illinois state tourney last season.
Kupec is due to report for prac-
tice Monday after finishing the
season with the freshman foot-
ball team.
The team as a whole rivals
any group the Wolverines have
had in many years. Honig sees
the squad as better than the one
which produced Henry Wilmore,
John Lockard, Ernie Johnson
and others two years ago. A
In fact, the fre'shman mentor
is holding out hope for the Baby
Blue to knock off the big boys
in the annual freshman-varsity
game.
Honig also sees a good shot at
an undefeated season, some-
thing which Wilmore and com-
pany fell just short of two years
ago, However, standing in the
way of a perfect record are
three perennial powers, Notre
Dame, Ohio State and Michigan
State.
The remainder of the sched-
ule has the usual amount of
fluff to serve as scrimmage
partners as a result of the re-
strictions placed on freshman
basketball competition by the
Big Ten.
The preview of the freshman
season, and Michigan basketball
hopes for the next three years
for that matter should be the
freshman-varsity encounter at
Crisler Arena November 23 and
maybe it will mark the begin-
ning of a second Russell dynas-
ty in Ann Arbor.

I

4.

35

t

but don'It t o close, uob

Player primes
Gary, Player grimaces as he blasts his way out of a sand trap
yesterday during a practice round for the World Cup Interna-
tional Golf Tourney. Player and Harold Henning are teamed
to represent South Africa. Lee Trevino and Jack Nicklaus will
represent the United States in the tournament which begins to-
day.

-MAW
s;s
T HE CLA N DEST IN E C VENTION
For the past few weeks, a Clandestine Convention hs een secretly working to impose a non-elec-
tive "representative" organization on all graduate and professional students. This non-elective body
is to become the sole spokesman and appointment-making body for 13,773 students, and will have
money-collecting and money-spending power.
The 13,773 students being "represented" by this orgnization will never be allowed to vote on whether
to create this body; to vote on particular features of the constitution; or to elect their "representatives"
to this body. The 13,773 constituents will never be allowed o vote on dues or spending, to elect the
officers, to recall the officers or appointees, to forc2 a vote on the body's actions or inactions (refer-
endum and initiative), or to vote or force a vote On amending this body's constitution.
Not only is the work of the Clandestine Convention secret and undemocratic, but the Clandestine Con-
vention attempted to get their first Graduate Federaion (GF- 1) "ratified" in the name of students on
October 25-precisely five hours after it was released.
On October 25, the supporters of GF-1 orgued vigorouy that 15 students in one college should get
the same representation as 1554 in another, and thot 1 8 ;n a third school should have one quarter
the representation of 7880 in another. They argued for the, representation of "interest groups," and
that the precious voice of the small schools must be overrepresented. The malapportionment was so
grotesque, however, that the GF-1 people graciously decided to redraft the constitution---yielding
THE 654 UN-PERSONS IN THE 4 UN-SCHOOLS
After shedding their crocodile tears elver the small schools, and trying to allure them with 100-to-1
overrepresentation, the Clandestine Convention produced the final solution to the small school problem,
Rather than simply switch to a properly-apportiones eective system, they deleted 4 schools with 654
students!
Although GF-2 will still claim to represent all greduate and professional students, the 654 graduate
students in the 4 inconvenient schools (Music, A&D, Pharmacy, Natural Resources) will simply be
given no voice at all. Two other schools, each 25, ,undergraduate (but with more muscle) will be
allowed to stay. Perhaps the villain here is not really the Clandestine Convention for, as John Ken-
nedy said in his lnaugural, "those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended
up inside."
All the other defec of GF-1, including double voresnttio, were retained in CF- 2
Th BL AN K CHEC Senate A ssembly
On October 18 (ntoe the date , Senate Assembly voted to seat the appointees of this as-yet-uncreated
organization, with its as-of then unwritten casuio, and w ith its still-undetermined constituency!
This amazing conferral of power can only be explainedb y Senate Assembly's extraordinary personal
trust in the Universitv Public Relations employee who was sperhending GF. Bluntly, Senate Assembly
decided to have a company union created for it. Indeed. th philosophy that the authority to choose
student representatives emanates from the Univerty is the basis for GF. It is orecisely what allowed
the late Graduate Assembly (GA to, feel it was "above the law"- not even subject to its own con-
stitution's quorum and annual elections provisions.
Why follow a constitution, or hold elections, or listen to ,tudents, or a judiciary when your authority
comes from Senate Assembly?
WHAT CAN YO
Not much. The people pushing GF do not need student .upor, and they couldn't care less what you
think. Upon atoending his school government meeting, one student was told that he "was merely one
student, not representing anybody," and "No," he could not speak to the Convention because he was
"unofficial'' As long as the GF people are armed with their blank check from Senate Assembly, they
will not need to solicit student consent for their constitution. And, of necessity, their Convention must
remain closed because their potron did not confer the eovernment-creating power on just anyone-but

PRO WRESTLING:
Bruiser batters Buckeye Bill

4,

CITY-WIDE MEETING
HUMAN RIGHTS-RADICAL INDEPENDENT PARTY
TONIGHT-7:30 P.M.
Ann Arbor Public Library (5th Ave. & William)
ON THE AGENDA:
1 ) Platform committee formation
2) Rebecca Vanderhorst on black politics
3) City income tax position
4) HR-RIP and Robert Williams Defense Committee
5 Election of female steering committee members
-TON ITE-
Charles Gabriel
featuring
Pinkie Smith
Fine Food, Cocktails, Dinner
Open Seven Days
Monday-FridayA
11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday 319 S. FOURTH AVE.
S5 1.m. to 2 a.m. 761-3548

By CHUCK BLOOM wrestling. The ring used was sit- an excellent name for himself.
Fifteen thousand empty seats uated on the Olympia ice. Fans He's held championships from
jammed Detroit's Olympia as expected the matches to glide coast to coast. Not bad for some-
about 1,000 true red-blooded fans along but instead were left cold. one who was kicked off the Pur- I
showed up last Saturday. They The main attraction was, of due football team for hitting an
came to see "America's fastest course, the presence of Dick the assistant coach in the head.
growing sport" - professional Bruiser. The Bruiser has made an All good wrestlers are former
football players for some reason.
. 1 ~Probably the smell of the locker
GrLddeSPick gs His opponent was Buckeye Dr.
Big Bill Miller, former great (?)
Last week's winner was Lawrence Jay Newman of 326 E. Madison. defeated Miler cpBruiser easily
He will win, in addition to a succulent Cottage Inn Pizza, one free for Buckeye fans.
pass to the upcoming Daily Wrestling card to be held on November Miller, sore from having his rear
20. The main event will match the Ann Arbor tag champs, the Flying reamed by the Bruiser, did talk
Wolverines, Gorilla Greer and Bubba Constrictor, against the team after the match. His press release
of Chip Papanek and Eggsucker Shackelford. The latter team, fresh built him up as an All-American
from victory in the Frieze "500", will try their luck in a new arena.
The Wolverines won the titles on a decision by the DWA (Daily
Wrestling Association). This occurred when the Buckeye Bums, Bill
and Dan Miller, failed to meet the Ann Arbor ringmen last Saturday
in Detroit.
As for the insuing match, the Constrictor was quoted as saying,
"I'll moider that sucking eggsucker." Greer chimed the same thing.
"No way are they going to beat us."
Tickets are $100, $75, $50, and $1.50, plus your picks if they ar-

rive by midnight Friday.
1. MICHIGAN at Purdue
2. Indiana at Iowa
3. Minnesota at Mich. State,
4. Northwestern at Ohio State
5. Illinois at Wisconsin
6. Pitt at Army
7. Auburn at Georgia
8. West Texas State at
Colorado State
The Visual Arts:
a Film SurveyU
0ARCHITECTURE 0
00
lonight, 7 P.M. f
R.C. Aud. FREE
--yo<--oe< ¬ęc--o-or

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Pennsylvania at Columbia
Cornell at Dartmouth
Duke at Wake Forest
Kentucky at Florida
Missouri at Iowa State
UTEP at New Mexico
Texas at Texas Christian
Air Force at Tulsa
Southern Illinois at
Louisville

The Bruiser

tackle, which was false. W h e n
questioned Miller said, "All-Amer-
icans sit on the bench."
Miller and his brother, Dandy
Dan, were challenged by the Ann
Arbor tag team champs, the Fly-
ing Wolverines, Gorilla Greer anco
Bubba Constrictor. But the pro-
moter, fearing for Millers' lives
and Olympia's reputation, held the
popular grapplers away from the
Buckeyes.

18. Texas Agriculture and
Mining at Rice
19. University of Southern
California at Washington
20. Slippery Rock at Clarion State

"Poetic presentation of capitalistic exploita-
tion, love, and high rents."

V

r

CORRECTION
REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS LISTING
Insert '71-'72 Student Directory:
The Anthroposophical Student Association is a cultural organ iza-
tion. It is not a political organization, as incorrectly listed.
EDITOR, '71-'72 STUDENT DIRECTORY

V

ON ACCOUNT OF
SID SHRYCOCK
ONE NIGHT ONLY

Saturday, Nov. 13
Union Ballroom

7&10

U.M. FRESHMEN, SOPHOMORES & JUNIORS
SOUTHERNERS ONLY
If you were born and lived all of your life before coming, to
Michigan in the Interior South (Tenn. Georgia, Arkansas, Mis-
sissippi, Louisana, Oklahoma, Alabama) and would like to
be a paid participant in a U of M dialect survey and were a
freshman here last year, please call 764-0349 between 8 and
4 for further information and/or appointment.

I

ANNOUNCES AN
Gualleries
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14th AT 2 P.M.
" EXHIBIT STARTING AT 1 P.M. 0
A . AIr r i c'4 ULU

I

HERTZ IS SELLING
NOT-SO-USED CARS
Priced to save you money
WE HAVE A WIDE SELECTION OF
1971

I I

i

I

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