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November 10, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

=Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 10, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, November 10, 1971

ON ACCOUNT OF
SID SHRYCOCK
a contemporary musical comedy
returns to Ann Arbor
for one night only
before opening in Chicago
Sal., Nov.13 Union Ballroom 7&10
November 3,. 1971
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Campus
To the Editor:
We would like to compliment the Michigan Daily for the
excellent coverage in the Sunday (Oct. 31) edition of the
Anti-war Halftime presentation in Michigan Stadium, and of
the Anti-war Homecoming in general. Lynn Weiner's edi-
torial reviewing the movement's past national actions and the
movement's "new move" recalls the excellence of the Daily's
editorial page throughout the 1960's. Well done, Michigan
Daily!
We would also like to thank the many students on campus
who signed and circulated the petitions calling for the anti-
war Homecoming theme and halftime show. In particular,
thanks go to the students on the football team who support-
ed the Anti-War Halftime presentation.
Thanks also to the Student Government Council (SGC)
for officially endorsing both the theme "Bring all the troops
home now, Let's have a real Homecoming this year!" and
the script for the presentation in the stadium. Without SGC
passing these as the representative government of the student
body, a less inspiring and positive script might have been
read by the official announcer. The presentation would not
have been half as clear and effective as it was.
We are also grateful to the University administration and
athletic department for their fine cooperation once it was
decided that the anti-war presentation would be part of the
halftime show. Finally, thanks and congratulations go to
the Director of Bands, Mr. George Cavender, and the Alumni
and Michigan Marching Bands, for a fine show and for the
excellent support they gave to the veterans presentation. We
hope the Marching Band will also see fit to include this anti-
war presentation, for all America to see when we go to the
Rose Bowl.
Peace and Jusstice,
DAVID GORDON, Grad.
for the Ann Arbor Coalition
to End the War and
Peoples Coalition for Peace and Justice
NOTE: This letter was given to the Daily last week Wednesday,
November 3. Unfortunately, they have a space problem on letters
to the editor so we are publishing it this way.

Torre
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Joe Torre of
the St. Louis Cardinals, who led
the major leagues in batting with
a .363 average and in runs bat-
ted in with 137, was an over-
whelming choice yesterday as the
National League's Most Valuable
Player for 1971.
The 31-year-old third baseman
received 21 of the 24 first-place
votes cast by a special committee
of the Baseball Writers Associa-
tion of America. Torre drew a to-
tal of 318 points compAred to 222
for runnerup Willie Stargell, the
majors home run king and out-
fielder for the world champion
Pittsburgh Pirates, who got the
remaining three first-places votes.
Outfielder Hank Aaron of the
Atlanta Braves finished third with
180 points.
Torre became the 12th Cardinal
to win the MVP award in the 40
year history of the BBWA award.
Bob Elliott of the 1947 Boston
Braves and Ken Boyer of the 1964
Cards were the only other NL
third basemen to win the award.
Torre also led the National
League in hits with 230 and total
Results of the National League
1971 Most Valuable Player award
as announced yesterday by the
Baseball Writers Association of
America First place votes are in
parentheses.

cops

NL

top

bases with 352 to become the first
NL player to lead in four cate-
gories since Stan Musial of the
Cardinals led with eight in 1948.
Torre, a Brooklyn, N.Y. native,
is a younger brother of Frank,
a former Milwaukee Braves and
Philadelphia Phillies first base-
man. The 6-foot-1, 210-pound
former catcher-first baseman was
a fat 240-pounder in little demand
just out of high school. But the
Braves signed him in 1960 for
their Eau Claire farm club.
The right - handed slugger
joined the parent club the next
year, and followed the team in
its move to Atlanta in 1966.
A holdout in 1969 and engaged
in a feud with Braves manage-
ment, he was traded to the Cards
March 17, 1969 for first baseman
Orlando Cepeda.
"I'm very happy," he said at

the time. "You certainly can't
have any complaints when you
get traded to a club like the
Cardinals. I think maybe I'll be
able to make some money with
them."
After winding up the 1970 sea-
son with a .325 batting average,'
second in the league, Torre signed
for the 1971 season for an esti-
mated $115,000. He moved to third
base in 1970 when regular Mike
Shannon became ill.
Torre, the first Cardinal to lead
the league in hitting since Mu-
sial's .376 in 1948, missed only
two games in 1971. He was hitless
in only 28 and only three times
went two games without a hit,
never after May 19. He had two
hits in 42 games, three in 21, four
in three and five in one.+
He drove in the winning runs
22 times during the season.

award
The 30-year-old Stargell led
the majors in home runs with 48,
one more than Aaron and twice
as many as Torre. It was Star-
gell's performance early in the
season that put the Pirates in
front and led them to the East
Division title over runner-up St.
Louis.
Bobby Bonds of San Francisco
finished fourth and the Pirates'
Roberto Clemente was fifth in the
balloting.
Ferguson Jenkins of the Chica-
go Cubs, who won the Cy Young
award as the NL's best pitcher,
was seventh. In all, 26 players re-
ceived votes but only the top three
finishers were named on all 24
ballots.
Votes were awarded on a basis
of 14 points for first, nine for
second, eight for third etc. through
10 places.

A

I

UNSUNG HEROES:
The serum-rugby's unknowns

--Associated Press
JOE TORRE of the St. Louis Cardinals, named the National
League's most valuable player yesterday,sreminds Cardinal vice-
president Stan Musial that Phase II of the President's economic
plan will allow him a raise for next year.
II
*We meet new people
* We laugh a lot
® We find consolation

e We play football

(once)

Joe Torre (21)
Willie Stargell (3)
Henry Aaron
Bobby Bonds
Roberto Clemente
Maury Wills
Ferguson Jenkins
Manny Sanguillen
Tom Seaver
Al Downing
Glenn Beckert
Lee May
Lou Brock
Dave Giusti
Willie McCovey
Ted Simmons
Willie Davis
Jerry Johnson
Willie Mays
Rusty Staub
Billy Williams
Bud Harrelson
Bob Gibson
Ralph Garr
Dave Roberts
Pete Rose

P

'ts.
118
122
180
139
87
74
711
49
46
36
351
281
20
16,
151
13
13
12
11
11
101
3i
11
1
1

By CHUCK DRUKIS
Every sport has its u n s u n g
heroes and rugby is no exception.
In football it's the linemen; in
hockey it's the defencemen; and
in rugby it's the forwards, often
referred to as the scrum.
The efforts by the scrum will
determine who is able to control
the ball, and thus, have the most
opportunities to score.
E i g h t players make up the
scrum. The front row consists of
two props and a hooker. It is the
task of the props, one on each side
of the hooker, to support the
hooker. During a set scrummage,
when the ball is placed between
the two opposing scrums, the
hooker has the job of heeling the
ball backwards toward his team.
Steve Chapman is one of Mich-
igan's outstanding props. "Bal-
ance," said Chapman, "is one of
the most important assets that a
prop has to have. You also have
to be able to take it and dish it
out.
Thesecond row consists of two
players, whose chore it is to pro-
vide a push on the front row,
thus keeping the other team from
pushing his hooker away from an
opportunity to hook the ball back.

One of Michigan's cunning sec-
ond row men, Gary Becker, feels
that one of the critical aspects of
his position "is to keep your head
up and your butt low. That way
you'll get the ultimate push start-
ing at your feet to your legs
through your backbone and up to
your shoulders."
The second row is flanked by a
wing forward on each side. The
wing forwards are expected to not
only provide a push in the scrum,
but also to keep the scrum from
shifting one way or the other.
Pete Hendrickson, one of the
ruggers hustling wing forwards ex-
plained that, "a wing forward has
to be fast, attentive, and able to
handle the ball in all sorts of
situations. You're expected to be

the first man on the ball defen-
sively, and a link between the
scrum and the backfield."
The final position in the set
scrum is the number eight posi-
tion. The number eight man is
relied upon to push the ball back-
wards with his foot out of the
scrum to one of the backs. He also
has the tasks of binding the serum
together and providing pursuit if
the other team gets the ball from
the scrum.
Each of these forwards is also
required to be able to play any of
the positions in the scrum. Once
a tackle is made, the forwards
have to quickly arrive at the point
of the tackle, push the other team
off the ball, and try to hook it
out to his own backs.

* We make money (some)
We solve problems
e We gain prestige
" We become self confident
* We debate vital issues
" We drink 5c Cokes
e We have T.G.'s
S-ILY staff
Come by 420 Maynard St.

Conference Standings

For the student body:
FLARES
by

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Nebraska
Oklahoma
Colorado
Okla. State
Iowa State
Kansas State
Kansas
Missouri
Stanford
Oregon

BIG EIGHT
Conference
W L T
5 0
4 0 0.
4 2 0
2 2 0
2 3 0
4 0
PACIFIC-8
5 1 0
5120

All
W L
9 0
9 0
7 2
4 3
5 3
4 5
3 6
1 8

T
0
0
0
1
0-
0
0
0

720
54 0

Levi

r\-

The Cellar Sellsore an O s.

If you..
.... dig crafts as a way of life,
. . . are blessed with a pair of
working hands,O
...are fed up with the
Establishment Status Games,
..are turned off by in-
different inst ruction,0
...like the idea of making
jewelry for a living, q
Phli ,.you may qualify as an apprentice in -'
Philip Morton's Jewlery & Silversmithing
Apprentice Program
PHILIP MORTON CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY
112 W. WOOSTER, BOWLING GREEN, OHIO 43402
Write or Phone 353-9932 for information
r < - <-=> <> < > < >0~<->o < -0~<-=>o < ->0<-oo>,-

Washington 2 2 0 7 2 0
Wash.nState 2 2 0 4 5 0
Oregon State 1 2 0 3 6 0
Southern Cal 1 2 0 5 4 0
U.C.L.A. 1 3 0 2 7 0
*California 0 0 0 5 4 0
*Barred from conference competition.
SOUTHEASTERN
Alabama 6 0 0 9 0 0
Georgia 5 0 0 9 0 0
Auburn 4 0 0 8 0 0
Mississippi 3 2 0 7 2 0
L. S. U. 2 2 0 5 3 0
Tennessee 2 2 0 6 2 0
Kentucky 1 4 0 3 6 0
Vanderbilt 1 4 0 3 5 1
Miss. State 1 5 0 2 7 0
Florida 0 6 0 2 7 0
SOUTHWEST
Texas 4 1 0 6 2 0
T. C. U. 3 1 0 4 3 1
Arkansas 3 1 1 6 2 1
Texas A&M 3 2 0 4 5 0
S. M. U. 2 2 0 3 5 0
Rice 1 21 25 1
Texas Tech 1 4 0 3 6 0
Baylor 0 4 0 1 6 0
INDEPENDENTS
Penn State 8 0 0
Notre Dame 7 1 0
Houston 6 2 0
Boston Col. 6 2 0
Florida St. 6 2 0
Temple 5 2 0
Utah State 6 3 0
West Virginia 6 3 °0
Cincinnati 5 3 0
Air Force 5 3 0
Miami, Fla. 4 3 0
South Carolina 5 4 0
Georgia Tech 5 4 0
Army' 4 4 0
Dayton 4 5 0
Syracuse 3 4 1
Pittsburgh 3 5 0
Tulane 3 6 0
Navy 2 7 0

0i

Fi

I

U-M STUDENTS: Join the
ERTZ CAMPUS CAR CLUB
WEEKEND CAR-ONLY $1.41 PER DAY PLUS 12c PER MILE (Two day minimum)
7.47 WEEKEND SPECIAL: RULES:
1. THURSDAY 6:00 p.m. to MONDAY noon 1. CAR CLUB MEMBERSHIP limited to students registered at the
$7.47 per day plus 12c per mile-Student University of Michigan who complete, applications.
buys his own gas-Two day minimum. 2. MUST BE a Sophomore or above-18 years of age or older.
2. STANDARD SEDANS on "as available only" 3. IF A MINOR, must have a minor release form on file at Ann
Arbor office.
basis.
4. ADVANCE RESERVATIONS must be made-no walk-ins ac-
3. CASH DEPOSITS of $35.00 required. cepted.
4. A CHARGE of $3.00 per hour or Regular Daily 5. NO reservations guaranteed after 6:00 P.M. Wednesday.
Rate (whichever is less) for units returned 6. NO large or special equipment.
after noon Monday. 7. NO intercity rentals under this program.
APPLICATION
1. Name 7. Age Height Weight Eyes. Hair
if Married (Name of Spouse) 8. Bank Checking Account at
2. Home Address Phone No. 9. Driver's License No. Expires State
City & State 10. Relatives in Michigan (relationship and address)

1;1

bra. nEir r-licnlnv---SE nnly limi#arl I I VW MW .4>I.7a Vaiue

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