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November 10, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

3 I p

DIAL 5-6290
STARTING
THURSDAY

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

AV

CL NT EASTWOOD

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, November 10, 1971

"PLAY MISTY FOR ME**
...an Invitation to terror...
A UNIVERSAL-MALPASO COMPANY PICTURE " TECHNICOLOR" ® ,.r
One of the most exciting films you'll see this year
ENDING TONIGHT: LAURENCE OLIVIER IN "DANCE OF DEATH"
"Schlesinger, with his ability to
capture the insularity and the hos-
tility (remember 'Midnight Cow-
boy') of urban life (in this case it is
Londaon that gets the going-over),
and Miss Gilliatt, with her tart
script, strike a responsive note in
all of us as they do what amounts to,
a seismographic tracing of the eimo-
tional ups and downs of two people
trapped in the death throes ofa love
affairs. The film is chock full of cut-
ting, sharp, sociological observa-
tions. More than that it is a sophis-
ticated, but very human dissection
of love as it exists in this age of non-
comimunication."
-Kathleen Carroll, N.Y. DAILY NEWS
4oseph Janni Pro- a John Schlesinger Film
BoSunday/Snday"
SIM T W T F S

Snews brie fs
By The Associated Press
THREE DELEGATES from the People's Republic of China
yesterday appeared at the United Nations.
The three initial delegates arrived to discuss the arrival tomor-
row of China's main U.N. delegation-including permanent repre-
sentative Huang Nua-which is expected to take its place on U.N.
committees and in the General Assembly Friday.
The General Assembly voted Oct. 26 to seat People's China and1
exclude Nationalist China--contrary to U.S. wishes.
CRIMINAL ASSAULT warrants will be sought against six
students allegedly involved in racial disturbances at Ann Arbor
High School, Police Chief Walter Krasny announced yesterday.
Krasny also said a black youth who allegedly hit a white stu-
dent over the head with a steel bar at Scarlett Junior High Mondayf
will also be charged with felonious assault.k
There have been racial disturbances at Huron daily since lastI
Thursday. Krasny said police will remain in the school as long as
"the danger of trouble" exists.
THE CITY OF MIAMI BEACH has been awarded almost
$400,000 in federal funds to buy sophisticated police equipment
and train security forces for the 1972 Democratic National Con-
vention.
The unprecedented grant has been approved by the Law En-
forcement Assistance Administration and will supplement $178,000 in
local funds already earmarked for the elaborate security precautions.
that will surround the July convention.
More than $228,000 of the allocation will be used to buy equip-
ment ranging from night vision and optical devices to 35 police hel-
mets, 40 face shields for riot duty, 120 gas grenades and 20 gas
grenade launchers.
THE SUPREME COURT yesterday refused to interfere with
a lower court ruling that pension plans compelling women work-
ers to retire at an earlier age than men violates women's civilI
rights.
The ruling, on behalf of an Indiana woman brewery employe,
came from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Forcing women
to retire earlier than men, the court said, "is tantamount to dis-
charge" on the basis of sex and thus violates the 1964 Civil Rights
Law.
SEN. EDMUND MUSKIE (D-Maine) yesterday charged the
Nixon administration "is using direct behind the scenes pressure
in the House to, dilute the water pollution bill that was passed
unanimously by the Senate."{
Muskie said the President is now opposing the bill because he
doesn't have the environmental backbone to support a tough bill."
SUPREME COURT nominee William Rehnquist yesterdayj
submitted a sworn affidavit to the Senate Judiciary Committee!
that he has never been a member of the ultra conservative John
Birch Society.
The allegation that Rehnquist is a former John Bircher came
in a New York radio statement by Sidney Zion, the former news-
paperman who first publicly linked Daniel Ellsberg to the disclosure
of the Pentagon papers.
Civil rights leaders Joseph Raugh, Jr. and Clarence Mitchell said
they were dissatisfied with Rehnquist's affidavit and urged the com-
mittee to investigate further.

Re-elect Nixon

-'

drive begins

- WASHINGTON (M - With election day precisely 52 weeks
away, the campaign to re-elect Richard Nixon as president
is already in high gear. The campaigners' slogan: "We're
going to run like we've never run before."
Nixon has not said publicly that he will seek a new term
and probably won't before early next year. But the ever
widening preparations for campaign battle would not be
under way without his consent.
Interviews with key officials in the Nixon camp dis-
close a curious blend of caution and confidence about
1972. Some aides, looking over the
crowded field of Democratic presi-
dential hopefuls, talk boldly of an
I ayvictory for Nixon nx year.
Some even forecasta landslide
such as the one rolled up by Lyn-
don Johnson in 1964.
But other advisers play down
such talk. "I don't look for land-
slides," one veteran political plan-
ner said. "All I want to do is get
the most votes. If you win, you're
in-it doesn't matter if it's by one
x vote or 10 million votes."=
In addition to the headquar-
ters staff, recruiting of the state
and local chairmen is underway.
"The chairmen are being select-
ed on the basis of their ability to
organize down to the precinct
-Associated Press level," said one Republican stra-
- ategist. "We've got to find out who President Nixon
)r trial our friends are and to make sure
)und) yesterday arrives they get out to vote."
start of his third trial I Yesterday the President's sched- i ebate over
arged with the fatal ule included visits to New York
and Chicago for appearances at
Republican fund-raising dinners.
His speeches were to be beamed foreign
" via closed-circuit television to 18
* other dinners. At $500 a plate, the
GOP hoped to raise $5 million as Ibill resum-ies
a substantial down payment on
Iiea rin g the 1972 campaign. WASHINGTON (R) - The
Aside from such forays, Nixon Senate yesterday began its for-
is expected to maintain a low eign-aid debate all over again on
political profile in the months a $2.3-billion program Secretary
I aIf ahead by concentrating all his of State William Rogers has
energies on being President, his termed inadequate.
advisers saye

UNOFFICIAL CAMPAIGN

Newton arrives fc
Black Panther leader Huey Newton (foregro
at the Alameda County Courthouse for the
on manslaughter charges. Newton is ch
shooting on an Oakland policeman in 1967.
DRAFT EVASION CASE
aCourt denies
on citizensl

* WASHINGTON (3) - A 27- applied for Canadian citizenship
year-old North Carolina native and Canada has no legal obliga-
who renounced his citizenship to tion to take him back.
avoid serving in the Army was If Canada agrees to allow Jol-
denied a hearing yesterday by the ley to live there, said chief coun-
Supreme Court.- - sel Charles Gordon of the Immi-
The " igling means that Thomas gration Service, then Jolley will
Jolley, a man without a country, cross. the border voluntarily or be
may have reached the end of the forced to go there. If Canada re-
road in his fight to remain in the fuses, Gordon said, "we will have
United States. to find a country that accepts
Jolley, who renounced his citi- him."
zenship in Canada in 1967, never When the news reached Jolley

i
3
r

Still undecided, sources say, is
the timing of Nixon's re-election
announcement. The deadline for
entering the New Hampshire pri-
mary is Jan. 6, and some sources
predict a presidential statement
shortly before then.
Early next year, sources pre-
dict Atty. Gen. John Mitchell will.
leave his Cabinet post and take
charge of the election effort which
he also headed in 1968. Secretary
of Commerce Maurice Stans may
take command of fund-raising
forces, they say.
In 1968, Nixon's campaign spent
about $14 million for advertis-
ing, and campaign planners say
the 1972 advertising budget prob-

Suit against
!Jnrve'v filed

in Tallahassee, he said he was not I
surprised and that he doesn't
know what legal avenues remain
open. He said he wants to remain
in the United States and he still

The Senate agreed to spend
six hours on each of two foreign-
aid bills, a $1.1 billion economic
assistance measure, and a mili-
tary aid' program of just under
$1.2 billion.
On that timetable, Senate ac-
tion would be completed by the
end of the week.
"I think there is an under-
standing that defeat of this bill
wouldnbe a catastrophe for the
foreign policy of the United
States," Rogers has said.
While Republican leaders dis-
cussed efforts to increase the bill,
Sen. William Fulbright (D-Ark.)
called for further reductions,
terming the program "a grab bag
for everyone but the American
people who foot the bill."
Secretary of Defense Melvin
Laird took the administration's
case for foreign aid to a meeting
with Republican senators.
The House, meanwhile, is
scheduled to take action today on
a joint resolution including au-
thority for the Agency for Inter-
national Development to keep
spending money, at a rate of about
$2.6 billion a year after Nov. 15,
when current spending authority
expires.

'' might have a chance if no coun-

starring
GlendaJatcksonPeter Finch
Murray Head
with Peggy Ashcroft Tony Britton Maurice Denham Bessie Love Vivian Pickles
Screenplay by Penelope Gilliatt Produced by Joseph Janni
'Dihrected John Schlesinger United Artsts

( iyo TH 'orUM
FIFTH AVENUE AT LBIRTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 7614700

WED. & THURS.
7 and 9
FRIDAY
7 ! 9 ". 11

A U.S. EXPERT painted a bleak picture yesterday for South try can be found to accept him.-
Vietnam if Washington cuts off all economic aid. DETROIT u(IA-A Pinckney man Attorneys for Jolley argued
The informant, who asked not to be identified, said its armed has filed an $845,000 damage suit that his renunciatiop was involun-
forces would have to be cut nearly in half at the risk of military against Washtenaw County Sher- tary since he did so to avoidv
setbacks. If not that, then the nation will have to try to ride out dis- iff Douglas Harvey for allegedly Army service. They said the issue
asru ~beating him and holding himbAfrytseoric.theyasaidtherissue
astrous inflation, he said. ; without cause in the county jalbefore the court was whether a
in Ann Aror.-jailman could be coerced by his own
In a suit filed Monday iU.S. country's penal laws into invol-a
District Court in Detroit, Leland untarily giving up hisgct sde-
Snay said deputies Walter Farley, They cited the high court's de-
Hugh Anderson and Lloyd Stamp- cision which held that Japanese
er beat him while he was visiting Americans living in Japan during
a friend in Ypsilanti. World War II did not lose their
Snay said he was held in the citizenship if drafted by Japan
county jail for eight hours with- because they were forced into the '
out charges and never was in- Japanese Army under penalty. 4
formed of his constitutional The government argued that
JUDY KRrights. He was finally charged Jolley had "by clear, unequivocals
with disorderly conduct but the and convincing evidence" shown;
charges were later dismissed, that he had "knowingly and de-
Harvey was unavailable for liberately . . . renounced his al-t
comment on the suit. legiance.
The School of Music and Department of Art present
MOZART'S OPERA
The Magic Flute1
English translation by Josef Blatt
NOVEMBER 19, 20, 22, & 23-8 P.M.
19th MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
$1.50 & $3.00 ($1.50 tickets for U-M students only)
Conductor Josef Blatt Stage Director: Ralph Herbert
urn rTICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
MAIL ORDERS: School of Music Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre,
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Please enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope
BOX OFFICE OPENS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15, AT 12:30 P.M.
TICKETS:
$3.50-4.50- EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
5.00 PRESENTS
MICH. UNION DONOVAN
and SALVATION
in concert
RECORDS,A
'Y l ,'wnrA . ! FIlDAY. NOVMBER 19, 8:30 p.nm..z

ably will be in the same range.
But there will be a new twist-
instead of hiring an outside ad-
vertising agency, the campaign
is setting up its own agency to be
run by Peter Daily, a Los Angeles
advertising executive.
Daily's staff will prepare the
ads, then buy newspaper and
magazine space and television and
radio time, tasks usually handled
by an outside ad agency.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
.Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subsecrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

But Senate Democratic Leader
Mike Mansfield of Montana said
he will oppose any such resolu-
tion until Congress has completed
action on legislation authorizing
the program.

DIAL 8-6416
4hWE Shows
At 1-3-5-7-9
It is a trip much worth taking. Not since '2001' has
a movie so cannily inverted consciousness and alter-
ed audience perception. -Time Magazine

r
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I HELLSTROMCHROINICLE

IZPSI-ANNO9147 ; _' o0
WASHTENAW AVE. Between

BOX OFFICES OPEN 6:30
SHOW STARTS AT 7:00

TRADER HORNEE
Rated X for Adults... F for Funny .
Shown Nightly at 7:00 & 10:30
PLUS
The Definite Film of the Newly Found Freedom of the
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THE RAMRODDER F)
Weekdays 8;45-Fri.-Sat. 8:45 & 12:00

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