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November 07, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-07

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Sunday, November 7, 11971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Sunday, November 7, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

State women's caucus meets
Continued from page 1) Twelve workshops were sched- tional Process" were university ad-' Creative Arts Festival
"represents a hope, not only fori uled throughout the atternoon missions policies, women's studies
women but also for blacks, young ' providing the opportunity to dis- programs, and gender-role train- Announcesits
people and other groups who have cuss specific issues surrounding ing in the educational system.
been fenced out of the political MWPC's proposed aims. The possibility of creating a
process." She advised that MWPC "ot acs a ruda h Organization of a Cenral Committee,
"keep participation open" and re- One such workshop, entitled "Is-I "youth causenti led "arect os for
itain its bi-partisan or non-parti- sues and Priorities, discussed akYouth," and the possibility of ere-
san status. wide range of topics including ati
"When we start to win, to flex abortion, the Equal Rights Amend- ng a "radical caucus" was ar- People needed to head following Committees:
our muscles a little," texlex ment, racism, the single woman gued at the workshop entitled
died "wcesareoiWexler pie- and the draft. Mary Clavon, not- "Changing the system: Alterna-
dicted, we are going to be op-ed community leader in Detroit,
posed, co-opted, sued, obstructed acted s l"resourcei erot, Following the workshops, women
and generally frustrated." te as a "person gatheredaccording to geographic
Following Wexler's keynote ad- .karea in the state and chose repre-
dress, a panel of three women dis- uAnother workshop met to di- sentatives to serve on an interim
cussed how to break into the po- cuss the goals ofM andttplanning committeeo.sereeonan
litical system, how to run for of- possible structures it could adopt "I felt a definite sense of com-
fice and win, and how to organize -including how representatives mittment here today," commented Crafts Fair
a women's caucus and "psych out should be chosen, how commit- one participant, "and I think that
the opposition." Panelists included tees should be formed and how we are now ready to go home and Lecture Series
Jean King, chairwoman of the , WMPC would be able to coordi- organize caucuses in our local con-
State Democratic Women's Cau-nate its efforts with both local gressional districts." Black Affairs
cus, Helen Harris, member of the
Flint Board of Education, and Topics discussed in the work- P li
Nancy Schauer, '72, shop on "Women and the Educa- FRuEE B L IARD
I NSTRUCTION Petitions available at UAC offices
Anut-war proteosters rally 2nd floor Union beginning Nov. 8
Thurs. 7-9 p.m.
(Continued from page 1) varied from the still-enthusiastic N If you have an original idea for your own committee
At Kennedy Square speakers ex- who said they would come to fu- Michigan Union these are encouraged and welcome
horted the demonstrators to per- ture rallies to those who consider-
servere with their marching in ed rallies at most a matter of

-Daily-David Margolick
Rive Gauche: Internationalism

By MARK ALLSHOUSE
Rive Gauche, the informal coffee house at
the corner of Hill and East University, is once
again busy bringing people, together in an in-
ternational atmosphere unique to Ann Arbor.
Sponsored by the International Students As-
sociation and staffed entirely by volunteers,
Rive Gauche hosts lectures, coffee hours,
parties, and international nights.
Friday evening was "Greek night. Rive
Gauche was crowded with over 100 people.
Some enjoyed a plateful of Greek specialties
for only 50 cents. In another room, a black
light and fluorescent posters, heavy wooden
tables and candlelight-all with a mixture of
diverse languages and international records-
presented the festive atmosphere of a party.
Coming attractions at Rive Gauche include.
a free coffee hour every Thursday night from
9 p.m. until 12 and Indian, Ukrainian, Arab,
and German nights. Refreshments and dishes
indigenous to each are usually served for a

small charge. Sometimes slides of the country
are shown.
Initiated in the fall of 1970, Rive Gauche-
housed in the University-owned Madelon Pound
House strives to create a friendly and informal
atmosphere conducive to people meeting each
other. Co-director Jean Farah felt this type
of atmosphere does not "exist in other com-
mercial coffee houses" in Ann Arbor.
Farah said the organization attempts to at-
tract both American and foreign students. The
1,600-1,700 foreign students on campus are
represented by 20 nationality groups, but Rive
Gauche seems to do a good job of mixing them.
Many visitors say the friendly international
flavor of Rive Gauche is an'interesting alter-
native to most Ann Arbor coffeehouses, and
is well worth a visit. Where else in Ann Arbor,
they say, can an American student eat Greek
food while speaking French to an Arab stu-
dent?

I

the streets "no matter how drawn- personal gratification but politic-
out the anti-war issue becomes." ally ineffective.
"We're not tired of marching,": Hartmuth Wisch of the Ann Ar-
said Debbie Vernier of the Student bor Coalition to End the War said
Mobilization Committee. "We have he was satisfied with the Detroit
power-we have our parents with demonstration and that broader
us today," she said and declared groups, which have just endorsed
that "Now Nixon has to keep us the anti-war movement, would
out of the streets." gradually work themselves into
While scheduled speakers such more active participation.

--

U

GROUP *
We would like to present our platform and our views on the issues in the coming all-campus
election to your house meeting, lunch or dinner, council meeting or to any government or
organization of students that is interested. To arrange for a GROUP member to speak, please
call 769-1593. (Call the same member if you would like to help in our campaign).
FOR SGC:
MICHAEL DAVIS-Grad BOB NELSON-Law

U.S. triggers Amchitka bomb test
without' immediate serious effects

as Sen. George McGovern (D-S.D.)
and Sen. Philip Hart {D-Mich.) did
not appear to ,speak at the rally,
other spreakers representing labor
groups, the Black Moratorium
Committee, and various peace ac-
tion coalitions reflected the broad-
ening spectrum of the anti-war
movement.
Appeals came from the speakers
platform for an anti-war protest
by workers at the next United
Auto Workers convention, and for
entin a d amatin and l etoral

Legal secretary Patricia Vera-
lier, termed herself a veteran of
anti-war demonstrationstand said
she would continue protesting in
this way along with writing anti-
war letters to congressmen and
being active in a women's anti-
war group until she felt the issue
had ended.

JOHN

KOZA-Grad

DALE' OESTERLE-Grad

MARTY SCOTT-RC

(Continued from page 1) ful," Gavel said, adding he was constituted a "controlled earth- pg
sistant general manager for mili- "relieved and grateful that there quake." against our oppressed brothers in
tary application, said he was sat- apparently has been no immediate hekarlng50heoler n Vietnam."
chitka during the blast were in,(ita'
isfied requirements have been met adverse human or environmental concrete buildings 23 miles from The demonstrations were en-
for the weapon. consequence." ground zero. One newsman de- dorsed by over 40 organizations
"I'm confident from the data we But he said the possibility of fu- scribed the effect as "like standing ranging from the Michigan Feder-
have now that a repeat of this ture consequences "will remain on a rowboat at the side of a ation of Teachers and Business
test won't be necessary," Giller with us for some years to come." dock." Automobiles outside could Executives Against the Vietnam
added.Dr. E R. Engdahl, who super- be seen shaking. Radio antennas War to the Black Moratorium
Meanwhile, members of the Ca- on the vehicles waved. Committee and labor unions. Des-
nadin potet mssin aoar th vised activities at the Palmer o h eilswvd
nadian protest mission aboard the ismological Observatory near An AEC scientist in Alaska said pite the wide-ranging endorse-
Svessel Greenpeace Too reported Anchorage, said information re- that by 25 minutes after the ex- ments, most of the demonstrators
they felt nothing at the- time of ceived during the half hour fol- plosion there had been 21 small appeared to be students.
the test. lowing the explosion possibly could aftershocks, all of them near; Protesters' opinions on the ef-
The vessel, on its way to Am- be used to prevent major earth- ground zero. fectiveness of mass rally tactics
chitka to monitor the test, waa quakes.
still almost 700 miles east of Its He called the test "the best data
destination when the warhead was on aftershocks that scientists havei
exploded. ever had," and said the test had
Canadian Foreign Secretary
Mitchell Sharp commented that
"the completion of the Amchitka' FOR WOMEN
test, apparently without adverse
effects, is a matter of relief, al- Talk with law students about law schools, the legal profession,
though it will be some time before admissions, etc. Look for us in the fishbowl November 8-1 1.
we can be sure there has been noI
harm to the environment."
The Canadian governmentop the information meeting in the LAW CLUB
posed the test on the ground it r<' LOUNGE, THURSDAY, Nov. 11, 7:30.
sustained the nuclear arms race!{?rV r
and threatened the environment.
Democrat who had opposed the
test, said he was thankful there
had been no bad effects.
"I have said that as far as Am CE
I aesi hta sAchitka is concerned, even a re-c hk
mote chance of accident is too.......U....
much to take," Egan said.
"I did hear that the yield was
exactly what was expected so no
future tests should be necessary at Keeping warm and dry is the secret of a comfortable
Amchitka " cold-weather adventure. You'll want down-filled
vests, jackets and parkas to keep you warm, and
Sen. Mike Gavel (D-Alaska), rugged rainwear to keep you dry.
long a vocal foe of Amchitka test- Famous brand names like Gerry, Kelty, Sierra
ing, said he felt the detonation Designs, the North Face and Alpine Designs
"may well have planted the nu- assure that you'll be snug and dry on those
clear seeds of destruction still to trips around campus and to the backwoods. \
be reaped" and urged President, Come in and let our Campers' Pro Shop
Nixon to announce a moratorium experts fit you up.
on further nuclear tests.
"I want nothing more than to
know that the administration'sf
reckless gamble has been success-
THE NEW YORK TIMES Cam pfitters
REFUSES TO TAKE ALL ADS FOR THIS BOOK. '" 215SORCNAASE ARNA6 (3 3 749 51
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Announcement of New Courses
ON
Technology & the Environment
for WINTER '72
PHYSICS 400: Energy and Man, T-Th, 2-3 (2 credits)
Instructor: ROBERT H. WILLIAMS, 1065 Randall, 764-3426
A seminar dealing with problems of energy production and con-
sumption in human society will be offered. Topics to be discussed
will include energy resources, environmental effects of energy
production, alternative scenarios for future energy use.
PREREQUISITES: a knowledge of calculus, senior class standing,
and permission of the instructor. The seminar is open to students
in the physical sciences, social sciences, and engineering.

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