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November 06, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, November 6, 1971

Former hospital head
slays wife, chidself
at home in Ann Arbor
By DAVE BURHENN
The former head of the Ypsilanti State Hospital, his wife
and their 12 year-old daughter were shot to death in their
Ann Arbor home early yesterday morning-the victims of an
apparent double mnurder-suicide.
Dr. Alexander Dukay, 52, wife Madeline, 50, and daughter
Laura Marie were found in the kitchen of their house by
Dukay's 26 year-old son Alexander Jr., who was in bed at the
timne of the shootings.
The younger .Dukay, a counselor at Traverse City State
Hospital, called police at about 8:00 a.m. to report the deaths.

Graduates seeking better representation

over drg la
(Continued from pag0 1)
to re-open cases and / set new
sentences in accordance with the
more lenient penalties.
The provision was the focus of
major controversy last year be-
founder of Ann Arbor's revolution-
befred He is currently servng
a 9%-1b year sentence for posses-
sion of mfarijuana.
A conference committee will be
e use-xt week to help resolve
committee's report will probably
come in about three weeks.
Technically, the House must
formally receive a message of the
Senate's action and vote non-
concurrence before the commit-
tee can be set up. This is not ex-
pected to occur before Tuesday.
The six-man committee will
probably include the chairmen of
each house's judiciary commit-
tee; Rep Bob Traxler (D-Bay
City) and Sen. Robert Richard-
son (R-Saginaw).
Each man is a staunch sup-
porte of his chamber's version of
Knowledgable sources in Lan-
sing are hard pressed to offer
predictions of what the commit-
igs seem ce ar: Te conferees
wil haedfficut resovin the
major differencesi the ong bills
and the final version will prob-
ably lean toward the harsher Sen-
ate version.
Te rea is tha th Snate
House bill, has demonstrated a
stubborn opposltion to the House
version. And the conferees, led by
Richardson, are unlikely to agree
to major changes in the Senate
Taxaler, however, warned yes-
terday that the Supreme Court
may declare the existing mari-
juana law unconsttuional which
If the existing laws were struck
down, Traxier said, marijuana
could be used and sold legally in
the state until a new law was
Onne widely circulating, but un-
confirmed rumor in the Capitol
says that a compromise on a one-
year first marijuana possession
penalty will be placed in the final
bill.
Regardless, both houses' ver-
sions would serve to revamp all
eisting drug regulatory laws.
In their place, all drugs would
be placed into one of five classifi-
cations according to their proper-
ties.

He said he was visiting his
shootings. After m a k i n g a
statement to police, he was re-
leased.
According to Ann Arbor Police
Chief Walter Krasny, Dr. Dukay
entered the large kitchen while his
wife and daughter were at break-
fast. He first shot the girl twice
as she sat at a counter eating her
meal. Dukay then turned the gun
appeared that Mrs Dukay t t
shots from a .32 calibe uomati
pistol.
After reloading the 7-shot gun,
Dukay turned it on himself, firing
one shot through the roof of his
mnouth. Death came instantly,
Krasny said.
A u t o p s y reports showed that
Laura Dukay was killed by two
shots in the back of the neck. Mrs.
Dukay was shot in both the back
and chest.
Krasny said yesterday that "we
do not anticipate any arrests."
Dr. Dukay was a native of Hun-
gary, where he received his medi-
cal degree in 1944. He also received
a master's degree in neurology
here in 1957.
(Continued from page 1)
ity than factory workers or teach-
ers," the spokesman went on. SCU,
he said, "served the needs of an
awful lot of students," but "it was
not a glowing success." Although
the repayment of loans was "not
as expected" tus 1 ea dI n g to
union is a good idea.
Some SCU members have com-
plained about the curtailment of
office hours this fall and long
waits in line, as well as SCU's
office on Gr eU St.,nea Hoover
-about half a mile from the Un-
ion.
men t "t (CU began to kil
I joined as a freshman in a burst
of student activism because they
advertised student control of stu-
dent money."
iBut, he continued, "if student
control of student money means
they go bankrupt, then I don't
want s t u d e n t s controlling my
money."
Students can withdraw their
savings shares on weekdays from
10 to 3 at SCU's former office on
the first floor in the Union until
Nov. 24, or by w ri t ing to the
League at P.O. Box 5210, Detroit,
48235.

(Continued from page 1)
"All I'v seen GA do is organ-
ize coffee hours," one student run-
ning for the new Rackham govern-
ment said last spring.
Students also charged GA with
meeting illegally by conducting
(Continued from page 1)
junior and senior; and $200 for
every graduate student.
gran would be distributedsco th
bsis of th avolum of federa su-
for its needy students.
Colleges would get a percentage
of the total amount of such federal
student aidgwith smaler colleges
funds.
the Senae, dirct a wudb
granted only on the basis of the
number of students at each col-
lege receiving federal aid-with
smaller schools getting a larger
According to the Senate's for-
mula for distributing the money,
schools with under 1,000 students
would receive $500 for each recipi-
ent of federal aid. As the number
of students per college increases,
the amount of money apportioned
would decrease, with schools hav-
ing over 10,000 students receiving
only $100 per federal aid recipient.
Nixon favors this means of dis-
tributing federal funds. Also Sec-
retary of Health, Education and
Welfare Elliot Richardson said
Thursday that he felt it would be
better to have no general aid than
to distribute it on a per-capita
basis.
lNixon also favors a smaller ap-
propriation figure for the federal
aid bill. After Congress passes the
entire education bill, House and
Senate appropriatio comuitte
money to appropriate for the bill.
If Nixon thinks this figure is too
hih he is likely not to spend the
Debate over the bill in the
House centered around the pos-
sible implications of direct federal
assistance. Opponents of the pro-
posal argued that a large federal
stake in the budgets of colleges
and univrsities could lea tofd
these fears calling them "emo-
tional bug-a-boo."
PAUL NEWMAN in:
WINNING
STOCKWELL HALL
NOV. 4, 5, 6-9:00 P.M.

business without a quorum of its
members present.
At stheo saetime, various gradu
a suit with CSJ charging GA with
being unrepresentative of graduate
students.
In the all-campus spring elec-
tions, RSG was approved and an
executive board was elected. But
the formation of RSG was only a
beginning in the push for a legiti-
mate graduate student voice.
Following the election of the
Rackham government, s t u d e n t
groups leading the drive against
GA thought the old graduate body
would "gracefully die."
hHowever, GAcontinuedut eclaimy
that legitimately represented grad-
uate students.
Arguing that the newly elected
studnent nthe Rackham graduate
school, GA contended its constitu-
tion provided for representation
for all of the 11 graduate and pro-
fessional schools.
The debate over which group
spoke for gradaute students con-
tued throughmtent smean
ordered Graduate Assembly to take
steps to make itself more repre-
sentative-withholding funds from
the group until some such steps
were implemented by GA.
Meanwhile, the two conflicting
graduate governments were at-
tempting to resolve between them-
selves the powers and role of each
group. Te governments reached
an agreement last month, whereby
Graduate Assembly would dissolve
itself and be replaced by the pro-

posed Graduate Federation.
During the past few weeks, fed-
eration organizers drafted a pro-
posed constitution which then went
to the various graduate school gov-
ernments for ratification.
At this time Koza filed his suit
against the federation with CSJ
charging that: -
-A plan for the formation of GF
was not filed;
-The proposed GF constitution
was not distributed to the con-
stituencies involved;
-Adequate timead opotnty
intereted patie in the cntitu-
ences was not provided, acn;
-The proposed constitution was
not put to a student vote.
federation organizers sa'sthatrGFs
was not conceived as a govern-
ment, and therefore is not subject
to the SGC procedure for forming
a student government.
By revising the federation's char-
ter, GF organizers are now trying
to more clearly define the proposed
graduate body as a non-govern-
ment group. .
In a meeting this week the pro-
stipulate that: rws ie
-The federatio dshall serve as
graduate student governments; o
--The federation .shall consist
of "delegates," not representa-
tives;
--No government which has a
mnajority of undergraduate stu-
dents in its constituency will be
admitted to the federation; -
-Major policy decisions will in-
clude appointments to Senate As-
sembly or other committees, and
decided by a two-step process of
voting which will enable delegates
to cast votes in proportion to the

number of students in their re-
spective schools.
Federation organizers believe
that a single body speaking for
the concerns of all graduate stu-
dents would legitimize graduate
demands in the eyes of graduate
students as well as University ad-
ministrators,
They feel the federation would
give graduates students a power-
ful and unified voice in Univer-
sity affairs .that they have lacked
in the past.
ate Federation is lik elykt eerge
on campus and its ability to ef-
fectively speak for graduate needs
will then be tested.
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LA W SCHOOL INFOR MA TION
FOR WOMEN
Talk with law students about law schools, the legal profession,
admissions, etc. Look for us in the fishbowl November 8-1 1.
Come to the information meeting in the LAW CLUB
SLOUNGE, TH URSDAY, Nov. 11, 7:30.

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ANNOUNCES AN

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ARM iUniversity of Michigan Film Society presents
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THE T HIRD MAN
(LONDON FILMS, 1949)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14th AT 2 P.M.
* EXHIBIT STARTING AT 1 P.M. 0

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