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November 05, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-05

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Page. Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 5, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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DENVER, TECH LOOK TOUGH:

WCH
By JOEL GREER
Even though the regular sea-
son has yet to begin, the new
Western Collegiate Hockey As-
sociation playoff format has
stirred excitement throughout
the league.
The failure of Michigan Tech
to reach the NCAA champion-
ships last year prompted the
1 change. The Huskies waltzed
through the league schedule
with an 18-4, mark and were
obviously the class of the West.
But the single - elimination
playoffs were ultimately going
to spell Michigan Tech's doom
as North Dakota upset the high-
flying Huskies in the first round.
In an attempt to return the
advantage to the top finishing
teams, the first round of the
post-season playoffs will take

changes

p layoffs

place at the arenas of the top
four finishers.
In the past, two sites were se-
lected and the eight qualifying
teams were divided among those
rinks by the luck of the draw.
The winners of the first
round will be decided by a two
game total goal series. The first-
place team will play the eighth-
place squad while the second
will play the seventh and so
forth down the line.
The second round with the re-
maining four teams will take
place under the same format
with the two winners venturing
to Boston for the NCAA finals.
With the home-ice advantage
and the two-game total goal
series, the chances of a low
eschelon team reaching the na-
tionals appear rather slim.
The competitiveness during

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Eastern Michigan University
collected two first-place votes
and 288 points, rising from
fourth to second place in this
week's Associated Press college
division polls.
McNeese State, 7-0, took over
first place, replacing Delaware
which dropped to third after be-
ing upset by Temple 32-27.
Under second year coach, Jack
Doland, McNeese State which
finished 5-6 a year ago has
blown away seven opponents in
its seven starts this season.
Only once in the school's his-
tory, in 1963, has the team fin-
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
" Wright
Lee
Male

ished unbeaten, winning eight
games. And that was the only
previous year that the Cow-
boys ever were ranked in the
Top Ten, placing ninth one
week.
In the latest balloting by a
panel of 18 sports writers and
broadcasters, the Cowboys re-
ceived 11 first - place votes and
324 points in climbing from sec-
ond to first,
The top ten teams in the Associated
Press college division football poll with
first place votes, season records and to-
tal points on a 20-18-16-14-12-10-9-8-
-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:
1. McNeese State (11) 7-0 324
2. Eastern Michigan (2) 6-0-1 288
3. Delaware (1) 6-1 225
4. North Dakota (3) 6-2 213
5. Louisiana Tech 6-1 167
6. Western Kentucky 6-1 164
7. Tennessee State 6-1 156
8. Akron . 6-1 150
9. North Dakota State 6-2 73
10. Boise State (1) 7-1 54
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reg. $1.25
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the regular season should also
improve as it will now make
a big difference where each
team finishes in the standings.
In the past, neither the first-
place nor eighth-place team had
an advantage going into the
playoffs.
A wide-open race is once
again expected for the final six
playoff spots but Michigan Tech
and Denver look like solid one-
two finishers. "They're defi-
nitely the top two teams," af-
.firms Michigan mentor Al Ren-
frew, "But beyond them, it's
simply too early to speculate."
The Huskies have lost nine
seniors via graduation but the
nucleus of their high scoring at-
tack returns.
Huskie coach John McInnes
must find replacements for right
wings Carl, Ohlsten (10 points)
and Ken Tucker (21 points),
Other than those positions,
Mclnnes has anabundance of
veterans. Tech's leading scor-
ers last year were a pair of
freshmen. Mike Usitalo who
grabbed the "top freshman"
award in the WCHA racked up
45 points while center Gary
Crosby had 39.
Michigan Tech's only real
problem may be at defense
where both high-scoring John
Grisdale and All-American Rob
Murray have graduate. But
Morris Trewin, another All-
American, who fashioned a 2.5
goals-against average, returns in
goal and McInnes need not wor-
ry a great deal-
The -situation is even prettier
in Denver where nearly every-
one returns from the team that
finished third in the NCAA
championships. Only Danny
Helm is lost to the defense
which will return four veterans
including All - American M i k e
Christie.
Ron Grahame returns to
guard the twine while Denver's
entire top three lines remain
untouched.
The offense is led by WCHA
leading scorer Vic Venasky (56)
points) who made the All Amer-
ica team as a freshman. The
Pioneers are once again expect-

ed to make a run at the na-
tional championship which
they've already captured five
times. Only Michigan, with
seven, has won more.
In last year's nationals, Bos-
ton University captured the
crown by defeating Denver in
the semi-finals and Minnesota
in the finals. Denver knocked
off Harvard for consolation
honors.
The East's representatives in
this year's NCAA finals should
again feature Boston- U. but the
second squad could be any of
perhaps six.
Boston's Terriers should make
it back to the finals with their
two top goaltenders leading the
way. Both Dan Brady and Tim
Regan have been superb. Goal-
keeping was the difference last
year in the East, but it will
be magnified this season as
Cornell, Clarkston andsHarvard
all lost their netminders.
With some adequate replace-
ments, Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute, B r o w n and New
Hampshire all should figure in
the Eastern Collegiate Athletic
Association conference race.

-Daiy-Jim wallace
MICHIGAN'S Bernie Gagnon (7) pokes the puck ahead during
a game with Minnesota-Duluth last year. Gagnon, who lead all
Wolverine scorers last season with 26 goals and 22 assists, re-
turns for his final year. After losing their next three top scorers,
the Wolverines are hoping several freshmen will ,join Gagnon in
producing some offensive punch this season.

EMU FAVORED:
Harriers scoot into M' Open

By DALE ARBOUR
The Michigan harriers will
meet a stern test today as they
host the Michigan Open cross
country meet.
Leading their challengers onto
the field this afternoon will be
Eastern Michigan University.
Eastern is defending national
champions in both NAIA and
College NCAA competition for
1970. And the Michigan squad
would find nothing more re-
warding than to upset Eastern
one week before they move into.
Big Ten competition.
Leading thesMichigan attack
will be freshman standout
Keith Brown, who has already
proven himself to be among the
finest distance runners in the
country. Brown recorded a 13:
51.8 three mile time ,on the
track last weekend and has con-
tinued to improve every meet
this season.

vidual competition for Brown,
providing a combination which
could almost guarantee a new
record.
The Ann Arbor Track Club
will be represented by Paul
Lightfoot and Mike Hazilla.
Both these men have recorded
six mile times on the track of
under 29 minutes and pose defi-
nite threats to the 31:00 mark.
Eastern will provide two other
fast collegiate runners in Terry
Furst and Jim Bilsborrow. With
their top runner, Gordon Minty,
out for the season with a frac-
tured foot, Furst and Bilsbor-
row have adequately taken his
place and finished in the vicin-
ity of Brown in a number of
meets so far this fall.
Having never fielded an offic-
ial cross country team before,
Michigan would like nothing
better than beating their talent-
ed neighbors from Ypsilanti,
who have a solid tradition in
this sport.
As evidenced in the past two
meets, Michigan has strong
depth behind Brown and has
been improving markedly every
week. With their young depth
and talent, Michigan could
quite possible set a new prece-
dent in collegiate cross coun-
try.

Their depth is centered
around a group of four sopho-
mores and a lone senior who
spends most of his time trying
to keep up with these young-
sters. This same foursome plus
Brown last week averaged 14:
18:3 per man for three miles on
the track, which is a faster time
than Michigan top three-miler
was running last spring.
The "super-sophomores" in-
clude Bill Bolster, Mike Pierce,
Dave Eddy, and Rick Schott,
and they provide a solid nucleus
for the Michigan team.
The meet is scheduled to
start at 4:00 this afernoon on
the Michigan Golf Course. Ap-
proximately 50 runners will
start the race, and they will be
representing seven teams from
Ohio and Michigan.
N EWSPAPERS
Friend of the
CONSUMERS

I

41, 1

.

s

TAPES

Brown will be making a bid
for the Michigan course record
which is a respectable 31:00.0
for the very hilly six - mile
course. This record was set ear-
lier in the season by Ohio's Bill
*Haviland.

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ANNOUNCING
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Second
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NOV. 8th thru 14th
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Below Mark's Coffee House

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PRISON REFORM
JANE KENNEDY
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Nov.8 Union Ballroom
8:00 p.m.
sponsored by
the NEWMAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Phone 764-0558 to Subscribe to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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4f

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