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November 04, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ti.. Errn kNr.,eimker 4 19Q7IL~.y "4J~IL.I ~ -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 nursauy, 1NUVeFnucr -r, r - - --

Page 5

'images

Canadians

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rotest
H-blast
(Continued from page 1)
Yesterday afternoon, 5,000 high
hool and university students
osed the Ambassador Bridge to
etroit for four hours, blocking
e two - mile s p a n with their
dies and fashioning makeshift
arricades out of construction ma-
rials.
In Sarnia, another 3,000 young
eople massed at the Bluewater
r i d g e leading to Port Huron,
'ich., blocking traffic for five- I
ours and burning an effigy of
ixon.
There were pickets and demon-
rators at the U.S. embassy in
ttawa and at American consul-
tes in Vancouver, Winnipeg and
oronto.
Last night, demonstr a torss
ounted a silent vigil at the
indsor - Detroit tunnel. Earlier,
ickets slowed traffic at the tun-
el.
A demonstration was also held
n Anchorage, Alaska.
At the demonstration here, stu-
ents singing "Oh Canada," the
ational a n t h e m, marched to
ithin 50 feet of the U.S. customs
ouses where they were confronted
ith a large contingent of riot-
quipped Detroit police.
Officials of the U.S. Immigration
nd Naturalization Service warned
e demonstrators they would "be
iet with force," if they attempted
o cross the border without going
hrough customs and immigra-
ion inspection.
The protestors then pulled back
o the Canadian side of the bridge,
There they continued to block
affic until the early evening.
Canadian officials made no at-
empt to stop the students from
rossing the bridge, nor did they
ry to collect the customary 10
ent pedestrian toll for using the
ridge.
Cannikin is scheduled to explode
mile underground at 5 p.m. EST
Saturday, the Atomic Energy Com-
iission announced in Washington
esterday.
The bomb is described by the
AEC as "the most intricate and
complicated configuration ever un-
dertaken in the weapons program
.. different from any other nuc-
ear weapon ever produced."
The weapon, designed as the
warhead of the Spartan antibal-
istic missile system, is supposed
to work by destroying incoming
rocket warheads in a blast of X-
rays.
Critics charge however that the
warhead is being designed and
tested for a weapons system that
will not work.
The Aleutians, where the test is
to take place, are volcanic in na-
ture and are located in what geol-
ogists describe as one of the most
unstable subsurface structures in
the world.
Earthquakes of considerable mag-
nitude are frequent there.

Security Guards
Supervisors
BURNS INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SERVICES, INC., the
world's leading private security agency, is seeking full and part-
time security guards for employment in the Ann Arbor and sur-
rounding areas. All applicants must be 21 years of age or older,
and must be able to pass a strict background investigation which
will include pre-employment and criminal record checks. Those
applicants selected for employment will receive training and in-
struction in physical and personal safety techniques, first aid,
fire fighting and prevention, parking and traffic control, interior
and exterior security techniques, pass and badge procedures and
other special training applicable to the'assignment, as well as
extensive on-the-job training.
Applicants selected will receive premium wages and fringe bene-
fits. Those having a particularly impressive security background
will be given special consideration for supervisory positions.
Applcants seeking full and part-time employment with excellent
working conditions, and freedom from worry of seasonal layoffs,
must apply at:
208 E. Washington
Suite 201
Phone 662-4554
Ann Arbor, Michigan
between the hours of 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.,
starting Tuesday, October 26, 1971
An Equal Opportunity Employer
BURNS
INTERNATIONAL
SECURITY
SERVICES, INC.

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MOCCASINS
by
Bant Carleton

B using.
(Continued from page 1)
flatly stated "there will be no
cross-district busing in Michigan,"
noting that a Nixon-appointed
Supreme Court would not uphold
it in court.
Roth's ruling that segregated
neighborhood housing patterns
could constitute de jure, rather,
than de facto, segregation is a!
first. Previous court rulings had
treated neighborhood housing pat-
terns as accidental. Federal judges
therefore, were barred from' pro-
scribing legal remedies through
court orders.
However, Roth found that De-
troit's neighborhood housing pat-
terns were not accidental, but a
result of official "actions and in-
actions" by "federal, state, and
local (governments), private or-
ganizations, loaning institutions,
real estate associations, and bro-
kerage firms."
The judge placed key criticism
on the Federal Housing Adminis-
tration and the Veterans Adminis-
tration for policies promoting dis-
criminatory "harmonious neigh-
borhoods" - racially and eco-
nomically homegeneous.
Parents in surban Detroit corn-
-munities immediately organized
into anti-busing groups - some
allied with NAG-and petition
drives began seeking the recall of
Democratic Sen. Philip Hart, who
announced his support of court-
ordered busing.
A ,rumor that a busing plan was
to start immediately resulted In
30,000 Macomb County children
staying home from school one day
last month. And an October 25
school boycott, called by NAG.
had little impact state-wide. but
caused high absenteeism in Pon-
tiac and some Detroit area com-
munities.
Roth's decision also drew im-
mediate response from the State
Legislature.
Though virtually no leq-islators
countered Roth's finding of illegal
segregation in Detroit's schools,
the Legislature joined the anti-
busing furor. though its actions
will have little effect on the out-
come of''the Detroit case.
Both houses quickly passed mo-
tions urging the state Board of
Education to seek an appeal,
which the board has declined tc
do. The legislature also rushec
through motions seeking a consti-
tutional amendment to outlaw
court-ordered busing for integra-

M

Anatomy

of

-Daily-Jim Judkis
con troversy

a

-- 11 . I - - --.- - 44

The amendment, which has "neighborhood school tradition" in to the one Judge Keith ordered Kelley said the state was "eco-d
been introduced in the U.S. Sen- j Detroit. for Pontiac, it could affect two nomically segregating its school,.
ate in a similar form by Michi- However, Rep. Diggs regards Ann Arbor elementary schools; children" and that the present sys- 1
gan's Republican Sen. Robert that same "traditional system" as Northside with 40 per cent black tem was "unfair, unequal and in-
Griffin, would prevent the assign- an integral factor in the promo- enrollment and Mack, with 53 equitable."
ment of any child to a school on tion of "racism in Detroit per cent ti Milliken and Kelley, with the I
the basis of "race, color, religion, schools." The Ann Arbor Board of 'Edu- support of most education authori- t
or national origin." Gribbs has recently come under cation emptied Jones Elementary ties in the state, hope to replace r
In 1967, Griffin insisted that attack from Secretary of State School a few years ago and trans- the local property tax system withi
federal desegregation funds could Richard Austin, another Demo- ferred its predominately black a statewide income tax funding
be used for busing programs that crattwhom he defeated in his student population into other city base and a corporate value tax.
had been "formally and freely" mayoral campaign, for "ineptly" schools. Both believe financial inequities
made by the "affected state or lo- handling Detroit's social prob- As a possible partial solution to constitute a greater and more im- t
cal educational agency." lems. the problems plaguing the state's mediate barrier to uniform, high
Also in 1967, Griffin opposed But besides Conyers, Diggs, and educational system. Milliken and quality education than imbalances
Southern legislation that would State Sen. Coleman Young (D- Kelley jointly announced in Oc- in the racial composition of
have allowed Southern communi- Detroit), a Democratic national tober that they were seeking a school enrollments.
ties to use "voluntary" integra- committeeman, black opinion is ruling by the state Supreme Court Education authorities around the
tion plans. He declared that vol- split on the desirability of busing. that the state's system of financ- state hope that the Detroit school
untarism was an opportunity for Rep. James Del Rio (D-De- ing education through local pro-s
Southern school districts to do troit), an outspoken black legis- perty taxes and state subsidies problems and the state's can be 1
;nothing. lator, said in debate in Lansing was unconstitutional, attacked through a combination
that "Detroit blacks don't want The present system allows weal- of some form of busing and paci-
posing prohibition of all busing busing anw more than whites do, thier communities and heavily in- fication of suburban Detroiters,
where the individual child has no and would support the proposed dustrialized areas to maintain
choice, even if the plan has been anti-busing amendment, if "white higher educational standards and and t r fsnd base
designed by the "affected state or legislators would enact legislation better facilities than poorer dis-|for education as proposed by Mil-
local educational agency." He ;giving blackrneighborhoods con-:tricts. liken and Kelley.
agrees' with President Nixon that j ro f hirow chos n
greeserl desegregation futds!equal dollars for each child's edu- '
no~~~~~~~~ fdrldsgeainfnscation"
should be used for busing pro- ank Ditto, a leader of a black
grams.y rop ~ BOOK wLE
The anti-busing votes of many y rsays "busing will
Democrats in the legislature ran cause too much rift and be a tre- '
countrato a tholgistadtaen a mendous waste of resources, just SPECIAL: Thurs., Fri., Sat. (Nov. 4-6 only)
counter to a policy stand taken a toda ihtepyia set
few weeks earlier by party leaders o a e s ctsOver 1000 Books at $1.00
and the state central committee.,of racism and discrimination." ve 100B ks t$.0
an the state central committee. The NAACP has already spent ,Making room. OLD & NEW Books
A conference of Democratic mo- $100,000 on the case and may
guls, including Kelley, considered initiate similar proceedings in OPEN 9-6 THURS. & SAT. 9-9 FRIDAY
an aspirant to Griffin's Senate Philadelphia.
seat, produced a resolution sup- And if either the State Board of BORDERS BOOK SHOP
porting busing when necessary as Education, or a judge in a simi- 518 E. Wiliam St.
an imperfect and temporary me- lar suit, ever orders an integration
chanism" and stating that 'the plan including Ann Arbor, similar ________. ~k
'"education of a child cannot wait -
until every neighborhood provides
a quality education."

I. f")
-i....
-o

Single and
double sole
construction.
Ring boot-Ties
Slip-ens
Priced from
$15.00
CAMPUS
619 E. Liberty

PAUL NEWMAN in:
WINNING
STOCKWELL HALL
NOV. 4, 5, 6-9:00 P.M.
75c

2 LOCATION!

DOWNTOWN
217 S. Main St.'

pp.

I

7
I
5
f
i
4'

Many state political figures out-
side the Legislature have remained
uncommitted on the issue of cross-
district busing, noting their re-
servations and also that court or-
ders must be obeyed.
Michigan Congressmen John
Conyers and Charles Diggs, the:
NAACP, the Urban League, and
the Detroit Coordinating Council'
on Human Relations, a coalition
of 69 area agencies, have all an-i
nounced their support of cross-
district, inter-city busing.
Typical of the stance taken'
by state politicians is that of De-
troit's Mayor Roman Gribbs.
Gribbs has announced his support
of equality of educational, job and'
housing opportunities, and has
lauded, along with busing foes, the

.

HOUSING OFFICE
IN-RESIDENCE STAFF POSITIONS
for 1972-73 ANNOUNCED
applicants required informational meetings being held Nov. 8-12
(SEE BELOWI
OPENINGS IN " TRADITIONAL RESIDENCE HALLS
" PILOT PROGRAM
" RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE

SHOP TONIGHT AND FRIDAY
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
sueded lambskin
overshirt for that rugged
outdoorsmon in you. .0
handsome pullover by
Cortefiel of Spain,
soft as a glove and
casually elegant.
Whiskey suede with
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two-button cuff. -
Sizes S,M,L,XL. $65. '

... r,; e.
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tion purposes.

SEE OUR4

BAITS-November 8, Monday, 7:00 P.M.-
Thieme Lounge
BURSLEY-November 8, Monday, 7:00 P.M.
-Resident Advisors-West Dining Room
BURSLEY-November 8, Monday, 8:30 P.M.
-Resident Directors-West Dining Room
COUZENS-November 9, Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.
--Assembly Room
MOSHER-JORDAN -November 9, Tuesday,
8:00 P.M.-Mosher Lounge
STOCKWELL -November 9, Tuesday, 9:00

BARBOUR-November 10, Wednesday, 6:30
P.M.-Newberry Dining Room
OXFORD - November 10, Wednesday, 7:00
P.M.-Seeley Study Room
WEST QUAD-November 10, Wednesday,
7:30 P.M.-Dining Room No. 1
SOUTH QUAD - November 10, Wednesday,
8:30 P.M.-East Lounge
MARKLEY - November 11, Thursday, 7:00
P.M.-Dining Room No. 3
es r'rn. . to C.:... OI'f.A flA

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