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November 02, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-02

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TODAY
Clr Daily
CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
on the Classified Page
MAOR Theater presents, Nov. 6 & 7
The Newcomers
A DRAMA OF SURVIVORS OF THE
CONCENTRATION CAMP
by JOHN BERNSTEIN
Saturday and Sunday at Hillel-1429 Hill-8 P.M.-$1
FREE BILLIARD EXHIBITION
JIMMY CARAS
5 TIME WORLD CHAMPION
THURSDAY-4 P.M. & 8 P.M.
Michigan Union Ballroom
The ALLEY presents
330 MAYNARD
MUDDY WATERS
Nov. 5-6-7-Fri.-Sat.-Sun;
TWO SHOWS EACH NIGHT
7:30 & 10:00 Tickets $2.25
ALL CHAIRS HAVE BEEN REMOVED
Pinball Again in the Basement
Adv. Tic.-SALVATION RECORDS
330 Maynard, 1103 S. Univ.
COMING-Nov. 11, 12,13: Buddy Guy & Junior Wells

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

'a 4-Q

*Iti~I3&Un

I ai1

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, November 2, 1971

L

news briefs
By The Associated Press

Federal
refuses'
to deter

judge
pleas
blast

I

THE U.S. COMMAND in Saigon announced yesterday that
American troop strength in South Vietnam dropped below 200,-
000 for the first time since January 1966.
U.S. headquarters also announced that an additional 1,325 men
were pulled out of combat yesterday. This accelerated troop cutback
came as informants disclosed Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird will
bring to Saigon tomorrow President Nixon's broad outline for the
definite disengagement of U.S. troops.
The Nixon administration is reportedly considering a residuall
force of 40,000 to 50,000 men by July 1.
THE SENATE passed yesterday a bill to give native Alaskans
$1 billion and 40 million acres in settlement of their aboriginal
land claims.
The Senate's action cleared the way for an attempt by a con-
ference committee to resolve differences between the Senate bill and
a measure passed by the House.
The bill would give the 55,000 Eskimos, Aleuts and Indians $500
million in royalties from mineral production on Alaska public lands.
AUTHORITIES IN ANNISTON, Alabama, lifted a cordon
around a mostly black area after a night of racial violence.
Black leaders, in conjunction with the move, called off scheduled!
protests in the town. The black area was sealed off after six fire-
bombs were thrown at white-owned businesses and two persons were
wounded in a shooting incident.
Leaders plan to meet to discuss a list of grievances presented byj
the blacks, primarily concerning incidents at a nearby high school
last week.
*

WASHINGTON (P) - A federal judge turned aside for the
second time yesterday attempts by environmentalists to halt a
giant underground nuclear explosion set to go off within days
on a remote Alaskan island.
U.S. District Court Judge George Hart Jr. ruled that
seven organizations headed by the Committee for Nuclear
Responsibility failed to prove that the government did not
adequately consider potential environmental dangers of the
blast on Amchitka Island.
He also ruled that the blast is necessary to national
security.
The conservationists said they would appeal immediately
a to the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington.
The appeals court has already,~ -
burned down one request for a
temporary injunction against the
-Associated Press blast - reportedly set to go off Ouse o
Thursday with aforce equivalent
to five million tons of TNT. - .-

Belfast bombing

A crowd gathers to view wreckage yesterday, after a time bomb
exploded in a downtown Belfast office building. Six persons were
reported injured. A clerk said two armed men walked into the
building, lit the bomb fuse and yelled, "You got four minutes
to get out."

But the first ruling came be- h old r t0
fore Hart was ordered by t h e ,
appeals court to study secret doc-
uments the environmentalists say
will prove the explosion can trig-on S1
release radioactive waste into the
ger arthuake ortdlwaves

15000 DEAD:

air, or injure wilctme.

1_ V 1

A

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT ONLY-TUES., NOV. 2
THE SEVENTH SEAL
dir. INGMAR BERGMAN, 1956
" Cannes Film Festival Winner 1956 & 1957
* With Bibi Anderson and Max Von Sydow
SHOWS AT 7 and 9:30-$1.00
330 Maynard
COMING WED.-Wajda's "Ashes and Diamonds" Polish
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative

SCOTLAND YARD DETECTIVES took emergency actions
yesterday to protect Queen Elizabeth II after two bombs exploded
in London and terrorists struck with explosives and bullets in
Northern Ireland.
A telephone caller warned that the tower above the royal
entrance to the Houses of Parliament would be blown up today. The
Queen will visit the Houses today at a state opening ceremony.
Detectives suspected members of two groups; the rebel Irish hav
Republican Army, and the Angry Brigade, a secret London group rep
dedicated to the overthrow of British society. disa
* * *
ISRAELI PREMIER Golda Meir discussed U.S. proposals but
for an Egyptian-IsraelidSuez Canal settlement yesterday with trop
the American ambassador to Israel, Walworth Barbour. tr
At the meeting held at Israel's request, the premier explained to
Barbour Israel's position on American program for a canal accord.
She asked for a clarification of the U.S.'s position on the canal settle- dest
ment and its delay in resuming supplies to Israel. she]
NO MANDATORY CONTROLS
Phase 2 to seek lower inti
WASHINGTON UP) - Home the Congress take definite ac- ing
mortgages and consumer credit tion - makes its position cry-
will be the immediate targets of stal clear - I don't think we are su&
administration efforts to hold going to get much more than on
down interest rates but a fixed talk and studies about consum- E
ceiling will be avoided, Federal er interest rates," Chairman inf
Reserve Chairman Arthur Burns Wright Patman, (D-Tex.), said. tio
said yesterday. Burns also called for speed in dov
But Burns, chairman of the achieving new international sai
new Presidentially - appointed economic arrangements and pae
committee on interest and divi- dropping the import surtax Nix- de
dends, said the outlook for in- on imposed as part of his emer- d
terest rates in the next year or gency program. E
so is uncertain. Administration policy has not toI
And some members of the yet clearly emerged in this field ten
House Banking Committee who and Burns declined to discuss sug
heard him continued to press specifics. But he said "There are inv
for stronger interest controls in those who feel that time is on bus
Phase II of President Nixon's our side, that we can be re- vid
economic program. laxed about restoring the inter- swi
"Unless this committee and national economy and eliminat- tio)

The appeals court also told
Hart to turn over to the environ-
mentalists all of the documents
I from four government agencies
which showed any potential en-
vironmental damage. Hart said he
did so reluctantly and added:
tIndiaseast coast "When I got through reading all
this material on atomic explos-
NEW DELHI, India (A,) - A cyclone and 16-foot tidal wave ions, I couldn't help feeling it was
e slammed into India's east coast, and political leaders a tpt in a eot
orted the loss of 15,000 to 20,000 lives in this latest natural ments turned over to the conserva-
ister on the rim of the Bay of Bengal. tionists and others kept secret be-
The wave and 100-mile-an-hour winds hit Friday night, cause he said they fell within the
the devastation was so complete that word of its catas- legal doctrine known as executive
ic proportions did not reach the ouside world unil yes- privilege.
day. Hart, who earlier had dismissed
-ay the environmentalists' case with-
The Indian government radio reported a million homes out a formal hearing, said he
troyed or damaged, leaving four million persons without turned down their second a t -
lter. The broadcast put the death toll at 10,000. tempt to obtain a preliminary in-
--__-___--_The political leaders, including needed for national security rea-
a member of Parliament, gavens.ded aions ecnsea-
their estimates of the higher toll . He also said the conserva-

erest rates
the surcharge.
I have grave doubts about
h views," he said, "Time is
nobody's side."
Burns said success in curbing
lation and the fear of infla-
rn should bring interest rates
wn in the long run. But he
id the immediate future is un-
dictable because of unprece-
nted cross-pressures.
Business recovery could lead
more demand for credit and
d to raise rates, he said. He
ggested an effort to devise an
estment credit geared to the
siness cycle that would pro-
e stimulus during d o w n
Ings without adding to infla-
nary pressures in boom times.

after a tour of the stricken area
in India's Orissa State. vironm h
The wave submerged scores oflon isf
villages and islands in much the blast, it
same way that a 30-foot tidal of a te,
wave swept through the Ganges Spartal
River basin of East Pakistan a the Nix
year ago and left 300000 persons needed
dead. ponry.
This new tidal wave hit the Atton
mainland near Cuttack, 225 miles vironm
southwest of Calcutta and about to file
300 miles southwest of the Ganges Hart's
Basin. hearing
Cyclones and tidal waves ar:e If Si
annual occurences in the Bay of down I
Bengal at this time of year, some- sowd h
times lashing India and o t h e r said he
times East Pakistan. for an
Seventy two hours after t h e Court.
storm had struck, most of t h e The
affected villages were still cut formal
off from the rest of the country. United
All rail lines, roads and air strips spendin
were submerged or destroyed. passage

failed to show that te en-
ent would be damaged.
ie Atomic Energy Commis-
allowed to proceed with the
t will mark the final stage
sting program for the new
n Antiballistic Missile which
on administration claims is
to counter Soviet w e a-
ney David Sive of the en-
entalists said he planned
an immediate appeal to
ruling and hopes for a
in the appeal.
ve should again be turned
by the appeals court, he
e would carry the request
injunction to the Supreme'

WASHINGTON (P) - T h e
House refused yesterday to let a
$1.5 billion school desegregation
bill pass without a direct vote
on busing.
Backers needed 238 votes to win
on the maneuver which required a
'two-thirds majority approval.
They mustered only 135. Thus the
move to suspend the rules an d
pass an unamendment bill was
crushed, 222-135.
This means the desegregation
bill remains eligible for action
later this week andtwill require
only a majority vote.
At that time, sponsors said, the
desegregation measure will be of-
fered as an amendment to a high-
er education bill, and antibusing
proposals can be considered on
their merits. The procedure in-
volved yesterday barred a separ-
ate vote on busing.
Speaker Carl Albert (D-Okla.)
had sought in yesterday's maneuv-
er to slip the bill through with-
out making it necessary for north-
ern Congressmen- to go on record
on the busing issue.
The amendment supports the
desegregation bill, but President
Nixon wants it amended to pro-
hibit spending any of the money
for busing pupils to overcome se-
gregation.
Education Committee Chairman
Carl Perkins (D-Ky) said the ad-
ministration "has made it per-
fectly clear that no federal funds
will be available, for busing."
Rep. Joe Waggonner (D-La)
told congressmen from northern
states "Busing is your problem
now." Rep. John M. Ashbrook (R-
Ohio) said that while the b ill
won't require busing, it would en-
courage it.
The MichigantDaily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mal.

ENDS TO N ITE !
"A Vibrantly Blunt and
Lifelike Eyeful. Brazenly
Sly, Boldly Fatalistic and
Often Hilarious!"
Thompson, N.Y. Timesr

"SEX"
From the book that was damned
By the author who was
condemned, . .

State
notice
States

Department served
yesterday that the
is temporarily su-

PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS HENRY MILLER S
sian a
RIP TORN DAVID BAUER PHIL BROWN ELLEN BURSTYN JAMES CALLAHAN LAURENCE UGNERES
Dsete a JOSEPH.STRICK Screenplay byJOSEPH STRICK and BETTY BOTLEY COLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

ALSO 2ND X RATED HIT!

- - o 11 U Vv aaaa V V faa - v a v+ - -V +- -----_- - - - - - - t
_- - --
American Revolutionary Media University of Michigan Film Society
pre sent
The
Ma
classic detective novel by Dashiell Hammett directed by John Huston
HUMPHREY BOGART
PETER LORRE SIDNEY GREENSTREET
MARY ASTOR
and Elisha Cook Jr., as Wilmer
Miss Wonderly, who Sam Spade thought was, "well, you know, wonderful,"
turns out to be "not so wonderful," but "good, very good."
She's just another contender, though, along with Joel Cario and the Fat Man
and his boy Wilmer, for "the bird," a black falcon whose enamel surface hides "a
vast fortune of diamonds, rubies and emeralds encrusted in gold, sent as tribute by
the Knights of Malta to the King of Spain."
Sam sends them all over, including Miss Wonderful. "Oh, it'll be bad at first, es-
pecially at night, but I'll get over it. And when your partner is killed, you're sup-
posed to do something about that. People might get the wrong idea. Any other way,
I'd never know." "Oh, Sam."

Indian newspapers reported of-
ficial confirmation of nearly 2,500
fatalities in the small island vil-
lage of Jambu, near the Bengall
port of Paradip. The village was
believed to have been washed
away and the port severely dam-
aged.
SNAP TMDAY AND wAE

NESDA Y

UNTIL 5:30 PM.

through
roundin
Nov. 2
Japan
iet Unio
ing fle
waters;
all bee

:

v o o H eironymus MERKIN -r
ever'F et MARCY Humppe
and find frue happiness9
* Rn..............ee............o*
'-' A Regional Filni Release - Technicolor.

ng the right of innocent
by ship and aircraft
h territorial waters s u r-
ng Amchitka Island from
until Nov. 4 inclusive.
r, South Korea, the Sov-
on and Canada, whose fish-
ets are in the Bering Sea
adjoining the island, have
n notified.

SPECIAL
Cotton Knit Shirts
4.40
Here's the shirt of the
season. . .long sleeves,
scoop neck, hugger
styling. . .now at special
savings. There's a great
selection of bold stripes
and rich solid tones
for the choosing.. S,M,L.
.ii::ii.

orPirTH roruM
FFNH'AIUN ATUWSRTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
LJLJ INFORMATION 761.9700

"TROPIC" 6:30 & 10
OVER 11:30
"HEIRONYMUS" 8 P.M.

V

STARTS WEDNESDAY!
"YOU'LL LOVE 'FRIENDS.' Andreas V
photography is so good, next year's Oscar
should be cast with his name engraved on
IC A REAITIII C"TIDE!" .

Winding's
statuette
it. THIS
.'^- nw I

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