100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 31, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 31, 1971

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday1 October 31, 1971

f

Anti-war show held

SENATE ACTION:

(Continued from page 1)
The band, however, voted against
the proposal for a peace symbol
formation. Sources said the band
felt it did not have enough time
to practice the formation. It was
also reported that the band con-
sidered the idea "old hat," having
marched in such a formation at
the 1970 Rose Bowl game.
In a compromise agreement,
therefore, the officials decided to
allow the observance, but stated
that only the anti-war veterans
would be allowed on the field with
the band
Dave Gordon, spokesman for the
Ann Arbor Coalition to End the
War (AACEW) and a sponsor of
the petition drive, said his organi-
zation was "very pleased" with

the agreement.
Questioned last night, many
spectators agreed that the uncon-
ventional halftime was "an emo-
tional experience in good taste
and amazingly effective." Most
recommended this type of half-
time show be repeated periodically.
Many said they were pleased
with the dignity and solemnity of
the show.
"It got its point across without
being maudilin or upsetting," said
Lois Epstein, wife of an alumnus.
Her husband Marvin Epstein,
'51, called the show "fantastic."
He said it gave the University a
stamp of uniqueness that distin-
guished it from the "sterile, insti-
tutionalized Hollywood razzamatazz
halftimes" of other universities.

World leaders, Nixon,*
blast foreign aid cuts

Union examines new role

(Continued from page 1)
parity is. underway. Parity would
give the students an effective ma-
jority because the chairman, vot-
ing only in case of a tie, is the
student president of UAC.
The board is presently compos-
ed of an equal number of facul-
ty, students and alumni.
Judy Kursman, '72, a board
member who favors parity, ex-
plains that "as student usage in-
creases there should be more di-
rect control by its constituency."
Although there appears to. be
concensus that the union is in a
transitional period of revitaliza-
tion, there is disagreements as
to its implication.
John Stamm, a board member
and Professor of Industrial Rela-
tions believes "the board should
be maintained. Hopefully more
students will use the Union in the
future but I believe it would be
acting too fast and too soon to
overhaul the composition of the
board."
Osterheld's second major con-
clusion - that student services
should be transferred to the
Union-is effectively under way.
In May of 1969 a committee was
appointed to allot space and or-
der priorities for the project.
As a result, the odyssey began
when the Office of Special Serv-
lees and Programs was relocated
on the Union's third floor in reno-
vated hotel rooms.
The transition was difficult, as
complaints arose among some
students.who got lost in the maze
of the Union and were confused
by the varied locations of student
organizations.
A second group of organiza-
tions, led by the Student Govern-
ment Council (SGC) and Black
Student Union (BSU), followed
suit in May of 1971 and moved
to the Union.
A new set of complaints, center-
ing around a lack of adequate fur-
niture and or operational neces-
sities, arose.
In September, the Office of
Student Services (OSS) packed
up and joined its colleagues on
the third floor.,
The final move will involve all
remaining student organizations.
They ,will be located in 60 reno-
vated hotel rooms on the fourth.
floor.
Vic Gutman, director of student
organizations, described the move
as an attempt to "centralize stu-
dent activities in an effort to make
the Union more student oriented."
He added that when the moves
are completed, adequate signs
should diffuse the complaint of
student confusion.
The final major finding of the
Osterheld report was that the
basement cafeteria food service
was both A financial drain and
the beneficiary of generally low
student use.

In an effort to reverse this
trend, a regental decision was
made this summer to loan the Un-
ion $300,000 in student fees to
renovate the cafeteria.
According to Stanford Wells,
Union manager, the revonation
will not entail a remodeling of the
decor; rather it will be designed
to make the operation a less cost-
ly fast-food operation. "We will
use the funds to streamline serv-
ices and renovate equipment," he
said.
Nonetheless, a large majority of
students recently interviewed ex-
pressed concern about the low
quality of the food offered and the
unappetizing atmosphere of the
cafeteria.
Dennis Webster, manager of
the U. Cellar book store which ad-
joins the cafeteria, believes that
"the food service as it is present-
ly operated and appears headed in
the future is not a valuable serv-
ice to students."
A secon~d renovation of a food
service in the Union has met with
widespread enthusiasm.
The University Club, previously
open only to the faculty, will soon
open its membership to students,
faculty, alumni and non-academic
staff.
After considerable difficulty, the
club obtained a liquor license. The
manager, Richard Greenfield, has
promised that emphasis on the
menu will be on quality rather
than quantity.
According to Samuel Estep, a
law school professor involved in
the expansion of the club, there
was a desire to increase the op-
portunity for informal gatherings
among the different elements of
the University community.
'The University has long had no-
toriously inadequate informal
gathering facilities for all mem-
bers of its community. Now, there
ise a possibility that increased stu-
dent interest in the Union will
bring about student control; and
the possible construction of a Stu-
dentUnion has also been men-
tioned.
As one student involved in the
attempt to bring the Union back
to life put it. "The building has
a lot of potential but it also has a
lot of tradition behind its institu-
tions. If there are going to be
changes, there is still a struggle
ahead."

(Continued from page 1)
bring it to a vote-and chances of
that are considered slim.
Final action on the bill saw
such staunch liberals as majority
leader Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.),
F o r e i g n Relations Committee
chairman J.W. Fulbright (D-Ark.)
and Frank Church (D-Idaho) cli-
max a growing disenchantment
with current foreign aid policies.
Part of the group these Sena-
tors represented are said to have
felt the current $5 billion of un-
earmarked Agency for Interna-
tional Development (AID) funds
not included in the bill would be
adequate until a better foreign
policy could be adopted.
Mansfield said "the program
itsself will not die suddenly but
more likely will die a lingering
death."
Many U.S. foreign expenditures
are outside the aid program, Sen.
Church said in a speech Friday
against the bill. He said the real
amount of annual U.S. foreign aid
is $10 billion-compared with the
$3 billion in the bill.
Only eight Democrats voted for
the bill along with 19 Republicans,
while 26 Democrats and 15 Re-
publicans .opposed it. Though ab-
sentees would have the strength
to turn the outcome, they appear-
ed evenly divided for and against
the aid measure.
In Lima, Peru, delegates to a
meeting of 95 of the world's de-
veloping nations expressed both
sadness and anger over rejection
of the foreign aid program.
Most of the more than 1,500
representatives of African, Asian
and Latin - American nations
learned of the Senate decision
reading this morning's newspa-
pers.
"It is sad that the United States
is withdrawing from its responsi-
bilities as a world power," said
AAUP group

Monmohan Sivols of India. "The
step will affect a great many
poor countries."
The delegates are meeting in
Lima to attempt to draw up a
common position for the third
United Nations Conference on
Trade and Developinent to be
held in Santiago, Chile, next
April.
The bulk of U.S. support for
Southeast Asia is contained in the
$21.3 billion military procurement
bill, though the dead aid measure
carried $341 million for U.S. as-
sistance to Cambodia.
The aid bill also carried funds
for selling modern weapons,
mainly Phantom jets, to Israel;
some $250 million for relief of
Pakistani refugees; $139 million
for United Nations special pro-
grams; $309 million for the Alli-
ance for Progress, and funds for
a variety of international assist-
ance programs.
The $2.9 billion total of the aid
bill was $500 million below what
the House voted and $600 million
below the administration request.
Before the entire bill was re-
jected, the Senate had voted to
cut $160 million in development
loans and $113 million in mili-
tary aid; rejected another pro-
posal to cut U.S. financial sup-
port of the United Nations; and
scrapped a House rider to cut off
arms aid and sales to the Greek
military dictatorship.
All of these acts went down the
drain with the bill, along with
the many restrictive amendments
inserted in it by the Foreign Re-
lations Committee.
' E

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31
Day Calendar
TVyCenter Film: "Understanding
Money: Your Interest in Interest,"
WWJ-TV. Channel 4, Noon.
Family Recreation Program: for fac-
ulty, staff and married students, All
Sports Bldg. facilities, 1:30-5:30 pm.
Hillel Foundation: A. Yengoyan, "The
Armenion Incident," and G. Uzoigwe,
"The Biafran Incident," 1429 Hill St.,
7 pm.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1
SACUA: President's Conference Rm,
Admin. Bldg., 4 pm.
Physics Lcture: T. Devlin, Rutgers,
"The CERN Hyperon Beam and Tour-
ists View of SomeROther Experiments,"
P&A Colloquium Rm., 4 pm.
Nuclear Colloquium: D. Burke, Mc-
Master U., Ontario, "Single Nucleon
Transfer Reactions on Heavy Deformed
Nuclei," 143 Chrysler Ctr, N. Campus,
4 pm.
Physical Education Classes: Second
half-term classes in Ski Conditioning,
Volleyball, Diving, Slimnastics, Figure
Control, and Swim and Trim begin
week of November 1.

St. Joseph Mercy Hosp. Needs Volun-
teers: Orientation classes will be held
Nov. 1, 2, and 3 at 7 pm. at the hosp.;
call the volunteer ofc. at 665-4141 to
register, or stop in at N. Office Bldg.
between 8 and 5 pm.
Placement Service
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS, week of
Nov. 8; call 763-1363 or stop in to make
appt.
Northwestern Univ. Grad Sch, of Mgt.
Prudential
Councilfor Opportunity in Grad
Mgt.
Internal Revenue Serv.
Tennessee Valley Authority
New York Life Ins,
Lewis & Clark Law Sch.
PEACE CORPS & VISTA REPS will
be on campus all week, Nov. 8-11;
appts. not needed, just drop in room
3532 S.A.B.
STUDENTS WHO SUBMITTED GRAD
II FORMS: printouts are back, may be
picked up at CPP, 3rd floor, S.A.B,
THEY ARE HERE AT LAST-Appli-
cationssfor summer jobsin Federal
Agencies; includes pamphlet which
gives considerable info on govt. em-
ployment for freshmen thru grad stu-
dents.
INTERVIEW: Camp Mataponi, Maine
- Girls --Will interview on campus
Nov. 2, 10-12. Openings: asst, heads,
age 25. Waterfront, landsports, arts &
crafts, nature, campcraft and tripping,
age 20. Details avail; register by phone,
764-7460 or in person.

GAY 90's SING ALONG-BANJO BAND
Entertainment Tues.-Sun. 9:30
Fri., Sat. & Sun. family entertainment starting at 6
PIZZA & ITALIAN FOOD
COLOR TV Mon. Night for NFL football games
114 E. WASHINGTON ST.
OPEN 4:00 DAILY

eANpLE r
ndsoo e~ EAVIN SUPL
.1a $tt *,a
M~mL
a D~~~S
B~P" A CEOFPETRE
~25U lqP44
- -d -
iIP ,EI NEOI4...ES IE
0 6 COCR ~ 5
E~iTeR Op MR iFRN S

M1

4

views

tenure

(Continued from page 1)
"to establish a mechanism to re-
place faculty members who are
incompetent". "I don't believe we
can defend automatic pay in-
creases without merit considera-
tions", he added.
Speaking on salary policy in
Britain Friday night, Associate
Secretary T.R. Weaver of the
British Department of Education
and Science, presented a differ-
ent view of the relationship be-
tween the University and govern-
ment.
Weaver emphasized the autono-
my of British universities. "Aca-
demics run their own shop," he
said.

U-M STUDENT
BLOOD BANK
Tues., Nov. 2-11-5
Wed., Nov. 3-1-1
at: First Floor
Michigan Union
Info: Call 16-Guide
GIVE
A
LITTLE.

F,

11i

N

A

Cultural Affairs

BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBALL

UNION

presents
Art Print Loan 1911
THE "MASTERS" WORKS AT STUDENT
RENTAL PRICES
Nov. 1-5-3:00-5:00 p.m.
Nov. 6-9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
2nd fl. Union-Small Ballroom

r

WASHINGTON SUMMER
INTERN PROGRAM
congressional offices, executive agencies, lobbying
groups, news media
open to all undergraduate students.
Mass Meeting-Tues. 7:30 p.m.
UGLI Multipurpose Room-Nov. 2

i

Happy Halloween!
from
Thi Ann raaf

COUPON
2 2FREE PEPSIS Z
with any Med. or Lg. Pizza
(1 coupon per pizza)
I U' U) I@4

.I

.,I

mIp

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan