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October 31, 1971 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

5unaoy', October 31, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page- Five

Sun~ciy October31, 1971 THE MICHIGA"'4 QAILY Poge~Five

PIPM

Joan

Baez

.

.

and

all

the

people

were

singing!

.

N

By ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
There's one more summer just around the bend for those of us who
walked to the edges of our dying kingdom last Saturday night to hear
Joan Baez perform at Crisler Arena.
Though the audience was diverse-there were little children with
their parents, and middle-aged professors, and freaks, and super-straights,
they were united in admiration for Joan.
Throughout a flight of fancy on a wingless horse, to a golden valley
where the waters of joy and hope run deep we flew, but when the time
came we stopped and thought-of Bangladesh, of Indochina, of being
trapped in prison, of being strangled in one's environs.
There were memories of earlier movements, of Woodie Guthrie's time,
brought back to life with dreams of Joe Hill, and it seemed that night
that we really could all coalesce and work together. But the odd thing
was that this unity was inspired by an anarchist.
And so we sat and listened to and sung with and discussed the com-
ments of another folk heroine, a very different folk heroine but a star
nonetheless: a star of "the movement."
And the star's eyes glistened as she spoke of Resistance, and power,
and glared at the stars of Crisler's flag.
Then when the magic had ended and the crowd dispersed into the
rainy streets of Ann Arbor, not a few of the concert goers returned home
to listen to Joan again.
... and all the people were singing.

Photography by Tom Gottlieb

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