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October 30, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Held Over
AGAIN!

DIAL 8-6416
Shows
At 1-3-5-7-9

NEWS PHONE: 764-05-52
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-054
Ann Arbor, Michigan

£fr1 i au

Dati

page three

Saturday, October 30, 1971

E!i

news brie fs
n e w By The Associated Press

People's

Republic to take control

of Taiwan's role in U.N. agencies

IHELLSTROMCHRONICLEI

i

i

WINTON BLOUNT RESIGNED as postmaster general yes-
terday to head back to Alabama and a possible bid for the U.S.
Senate seat of Democrat John Sparkman.
As postmaster general, Blount oversaw the transition of the
Post Office to an independent, semi-autonomous private corporation
known as the U.S. Postal Service. He said Nixon had asked him "to
undertake.a complete reform of the postal service and I believe that
job is now done."
THE ADMINISTRATION'S $1.5 billion school desegregation
bill will come to a House vote Monday under terms that could
lead to its burial rather than its long-delayed passage.
The bill will be brought up under a procedure, designed for
quick action, which prohibits amendments, limits debate to -40 min-
utes and requires a two-thirds majority for passage.
The bill has met increasing opposition since the busing of pupils
to overcome desegregation became a burning national issue.E
THE SOVIETS have made their first deliveries of new Mig-21
jet fighters to Cuba in more than four years, Defense Department
sources said yesterday.
The planes arrived in Havana aboard a Russian freighter last
Sunday, a few days before the visit of Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin,
the sources said.
Western experts calculate the Russians have furnished Cuba
with more than $1 billion in military aid since Fidel Castro came to
power in 1959.
THE HOUSE has defeated an amendment to the higher
education bill which would have provided a new approach to aid-
ing needy college students.
The amendment would have entitled any qualified student from
a low income family to a grant amounting- to half of what he needs
to pay for his education, up to a total of $1,400 a year.
Opposition forces said it would lead to federal control of the
program and prove too costly.
DAYTON'S PUBLIC SCHOOLS have run out of money and
will close next week, giving 56,000 pupils an early vacation.
They could be joined by as many as 67,000 pupils in 28 othert
Ohio school districts that may go broke before Jan. 1. The prob-
lem stems from local rejection of tax levies but is compounded by
a general cutback in state aid.
Unless voters approve local tax levies in Tuesday's election,
schools could be closed until January when they could reopen on
1972 budgets.
COMMISSION REPORTS

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (A2 -
The People's Republic of
China disclosing it will send
a delegation to the United Na-
tions in the "near future,"
made clear yesterday it ex-
pects to occupy Nationalist
China's seat in all related
U.N. agencies.
Mainland China vowed to take
full charge of Chinese affairs in
the agencies without ever becom;
ing a "superpower bullying other
countries."
A Peking broadcast yesterday,
China's first official comment on
its admission to the United Na-
tions, said the victory reflects the
desire of a growing number of
countries to have friendly rela-
tions with Peking, regardless of
the policies of the United States
and the Soviet Union.
Meanwhile, the executive board
of the United Nations Educa-
tion, Scientific and Cultural Or-
ganization in Paris voted yester-
day to recognize the People's Re-
public of China as "the only legi-
timate representative of China in
UNESCO."
Adopted by a 25-3 vote, the mo-
tion had the effect of ousting Na-
tionalist ,China from UNESCO,
formed i i 1945 to contribute to
peace by promoting collaboration
in education, science and culture.
The UNESCO decision sets a
precedent for other independent
United Nations agencies.
Peking's position prepared the
way for a series of contests in
more than a dozen of these 'U.N.
specialized agencies that tech-
nically can decide their own mem-

-Associated Press
Pat meets her match?
Pat Nixon, prolific entertainer and hostess, scores once again in a gay White House Halloween party.
Washington area children were entertained by members of the "Disney on Parade" cast.
ENVIRONMENTALIST LOBBY:
Group seeks nuclear blast halt

WASHINGTON A) - A federal junction from environmentalists
judge studied secret documents as the Atomic Energy Commission,
yesterday which environmentalists made final preparations for the
hope will persuade him to order a blast by stopping up a 6,000-foot
halt to a giant nuclear explosion hole housing the five-megaton
set to go off within five days on warhead on Amchitka Island.
a remote Alaskan island.
a reoteAlakanislnd.Environmentalist groups s a y
U.S. District Judge George Hart the documents prove the explos-
considered an appeal for an in- ion - reported set for next Thurs-
day - can set off earthquakes andj
tidal waves, kill wildlife and per-
mit radioactive leaks.

a potential for danger when t h e
blast, equal to 5 million tons of
TNT, goes off in a closed cham-
ber 6,000 feet underground.
As preparations went ahead for
the blast, Sweden joined Canada,
Japan and Peru in asking that it
be stopped.
In Washington, David Sive, an
attorney for the environmentalists,
said he will carry an immediate
appeal to a higher court if Judge
Hart turns down his request for
an injunction against the test.

bership.
There seemed to be little doubt
among U.N. diplomats that the
outcome in the agencies - includ-
ing the World Health Organiza-
tion, the International Bank, and
the International Labor Organiz-
ation, would be the same as the
U.N. General Assembly decision
Monday night.
At that time the assembly voted
76-35 with 17 abstaining to expel
Nationalist China and seat the
People's Republic of China.

Four government agencies were
required to deliver the disputed re-'
Amtrak, rail service faces large debt
ports to Hart under an order from
a three-judge appeals court.
WASHINGTON (A") - The In- only needs money to be financially erally guaranteed loans, the ICC The U.S. Court of Appeals turn-
terstate Commerce Commission sound but needs funds to improve said this will have to be used ed aside the government's argu-
predicted yesterday that Amtrak. the road beds, its equipment and to cover deficits and Amtrak will ment that the .reports should re-
the new national rail passenger stations. be unable to make needed capital main secret under the legal doc-
service, will go $5.2 million in the Inarottlrsdn io expenditures.
red this year and $72.2 millioInby a rapo tion s re n"Our financial review has ne- trine, known as Executive Privi-
Dec. 31, 1972, unless the govern- Amtrak's operations, as re- cessarily been restricted because of lege.
ment arranges adequate financ- quired by law, the commission cal- Amtrak's initial reluctance to pro- The AEC, backed by a personal
led for an improved fare struc- , aceide pronl access to all of its records .
ing. ture, with possible innovations access to a oig rd s, authorization for the text from
At the same time, the ICC urged like standby and off day fares, particularly those " regarding its
Aths mhg k sud dfuture financial needs and those President Nixon, denies there is
that Amtrak act to meet c o m - It suggested Amtrak consider supporting its operations to date,"
plaints about poor connections be- service to some major cities that the ICC said. The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
tween routes, trains not running lost out when the railroads hand- "Nevertheless, we have sufficient aged by students at the university o
on time, the quality and cost of ed their passenger services to information to convince us that Class postagewpaid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
food, out-of-order air-condition- Amtrak last May 1. Amtrak is substantially under-fin- igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
ing and broken windows. Noting that Amtrak will be able anced. Certainly, with the past Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
The ICC also said Amtrak not to obtain up to $10 million in fed- history of rail passenger losses, the day through Sunday morning Unives-
_____ofralpasegrose, se;ity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
-improvement expected of Amtrak carrier, $11 by mail.
cannot be accomplished within the Summer Session published Tuesday
framework of the existing corpor- through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
ate financial structure." ion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Presidential candidacy
hinted in McCarthy letter

WASHINGTON (P - Former
Sen. Eugene McCarthy of Min-
nesota sent 100,000 likely poli-
tical allies a letter yesterday
virtually announcing his presi-
dential candidacy in 1972, and
indicating he might campaign
outside the major party frame-
work.
"The party that wins the pre-
sidency in 1972 must stand for
something," McCarthy said.
"The election should not be set-
tled by default or choice of the
better of two marginal candi-
dates."

_.__ __ __
k

...........-...-......

WORSHIP

WEi

ARM/Michigan Film

Society

presents

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., t10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:30 a.m.-Sunday School.
10:30 a.m. -- Service. Sermon: "A Common
Care for Unity." Rev. Howard F. Gebhart,
preaching.
There is infant and toddler care in the nursery.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer (chapel).
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School--9:45 a.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 1 1:00 a.m. - Sermon by Bishop
James Armstrong, Henry Martin LoudLec-
turer.
Broadcast over stations WNRS 1290 am,
WNRZ 103 fin, 1 1:00 to noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Oct. 31:
No Sunday eve.ning program because of lunch-
eon with Bishop Armstrong.
Thursday, Nov. 4:
6:00 p.m.-Grad Community.
Friday. Nov. 5:
7:30 p.m.-Undergraduates and Young Mar-
rieds meet at Wesley for hayride.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Woshtenow
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship. Worship will
center around the liturgy of John Calvin.
Sermon is "Understanding What You
Read."
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship. Discussion will
focus on the film "The Parable."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
AND CENTER

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.-Reformation
Day Service, Communion at 9:15.
Sunday at 9:15 a.m.-Bible Study: "Gala-
tians."
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Supper and Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Preaching Oct. 31-Mr. Sanders.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
ath330 Maynard St.
(the Alley)
Celebrate Halloween, exercise your demons
starting 11 a.m., The Alley (330 May-
nard). Communion. Come anyhow.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson

HALLOWEEN

-3D
of

- SPECIAL
hell

eyes

McCarthy, who sought the
1968 Democratic presidential
nomination in a challenge to
then-President Lyndon B. John-
son, said he is enlarging his
staff now and intends to estab-
lish soon a formal 1972 c am -
paign committee.
He said he will demand an
immediate end to the war in
South Vietnam, and he criticized
the campaigns of Democratic
presidential prospects, saying
that. on domestic issues they
"have offered little more than
warmed-over New Deal propos-
als or quantitative increases in
Nixon proposals."
HALLOWEEN
FESTIVAL!
SUNDAY NIGHT
FREAKS
DIR. TOO BROWNING, 1932
The freaks of a circus
troupe in a film which
has b e e n recently re-
leased in New York-to
renewed acclaim.
PLUS A SHORT!
Anything Once
HALLOWEEN NIGHT
The Haunting
Dir. ROBERT WISE, 1963
with Julie Harris, Claire
Bloom and Russ Tamblyn.
A haunted h o u s e in-

"in the gruesome division, this one is really very good!"

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