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October 27, 1971 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-27

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Page Six

THE !MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 27, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 27, 1971

NEWSPAPERS
Friend of the
CONSUMERS.

DESPITE BRADY'S ABSENCE
Michigan cage outlook bright

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Exuberant sports fans must
have been in a state of euphoria
just about a week and a half
ago. Why? Any one of them
could have chosen to view any
of a wide range of ongoing ath-
letic endeavors including T h e
World Series in baseball, pro
hockey, pro basketball, tennis,
and of course, football.
Such an overlap of sports is
not as pronounced at Michi-
gan, but still just as the foot-.
ball season passes the midway
mark the Wolverine basketball
team has begun to prepare for
its own season.
Coming off a surprisingly
good 18-16 season and a second
place conference finish, the Wol-
verines have high hopes of con-
tinuing their upward climb to
regain national prominence.
The major basis for this op-
timism is 6-3/2 forward Henry
Wilmore. Wilmore, as a sopho-

more, broke all kinds of records
for a first year varsity player
while pouring in over 20 points a
game and pulling in over 10 re-
bounds a contest.
Less publicized and less pro-
lific in point production are two
other important returning cogs,
senior Wayne Grabiec and jun-
ior center Ken Brady.
However, Brady at 6-9 has
been lost for at least the non-
conference portion of the sched-
ule due to a knee injury incur-

red while he was getting out of
his car.
Brady's importance is hard to
measure in terms of statistics
since his mere presence often in-
fluences the flow of play by the
opposing team. And his ten-plus
rebounds per game gave t h e
Wolverines the big man to start
the fast break working. Michi-
gan coach Johnny Orr echoes
this concern for Brady's loss, "It
will definitely hurt our rebound-

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HISTORY MAJORS
ORGANIZATION MEETING
To organize programs for this year and to elect
undergraduate representatives on the Department of
History Curriculum Committee and its Steering Com-
mittee. History majors are invited to meet in Haven
Hall 3609 at 12 noon on Thursday, October 28.
Bring a bag lunch. Coffee will be served
BRADFORD PERKINS
Chairman

The 1971 edition of the uac muggers took the field Sunday
against the undefeated-for-all-time purple and pure Daily Libel
Gridiron Machine. As usual, the odious muggers sent out a blatant
collection of heavily-bearded, burly ringers: one mountain-like grid-
der was tentatively identified as Rocko Cowsnofski, a former All-
World lineman at Brooklyn School for the Criminally Demented.
But as usual, it was veni, vidi, muggi as the powerful Libels
blew the slimy muggers off Wines Field and back in to their dens
under the ground. After the Libels had amassed something like 684
points, the few muggers remaining on the field rolled over on their
stomachs and begged for a flailing. "Anything, but just let us go
home and drown our shame in bat-slime," whimpered one broken
mugger.
Every single stout-hearted Libel performed magnificently: Gor-
illa Greer hugged pass after pass to his brutal body, Sugarfoot Olin
fell down a lot, Nebulous Noveck scampered hare-like through the
befuddled mugger secondary, and on and on, through names which
read like a Football Hall of Fame.
Up to now, none of the shamed muggers has dared show his puss
on campus, due both to Sunday's crushing Libel victory and the
anemic sales of this year's abominable homecoming concerts. But

ing. Defense will be very diffi-
cult not having a big guy."
But the Wolverines are n o t
letting this turn of events
dampen their hopes - and with
good reason. Ernie Johnson, a
pretty big 6-8 junior, played
some at center and forward last
season, and is expected to fill in
at the center post. Johnson
showed occasional sparks of ex-
cellent' play last season, but has
to avoid some of the costly er-
rors he made as a sophomore.
At only 200 pounds, Johnson
may have some problems against
heftier centers.
Orr doesn't think that the loss
of Brady wil change his f a s t
style of play. "We won't alter
the way we play. We will be
faster, and quicker although cer-
tainly not very big."
Team captains Grabiec and
little-Dave Hart, 5-8, will open
practice as the leading candi-
dates at guard. Grabiec towers
over most other guards at 6-4
and is known for his deadly out-
side shot. Hart played the back-
up to graduated Dan Fife and
Grabiec last season.
Depth seems to be no prob-
lem at guard since several play-
ers up from the freshman squad
could challenge for one of the
backcourt positions. Sophs Sam
Brady, Mike Weaver, and Terry
Tyler appear to have a good
chance to oust one of the re-
turnees, along with lettermen
Leon Roberts and Greg Boss.
With Grabiec's size, Orr has
suggested that there might be
occasions where he would "shift
Grabiec and Wilmore at guard
and forward." Wilmore did play
guard part of the time as a
freshman.
Orr has not decided on who
will take over the ball handling
chores owned by Fife last year.
Most likely.the task will be di-
vided between the two guards
and Wilmore.
The forward spot opposite that
held down by Wilmore is still
being contested. Junior J o h n
Lockard will be given first shot
at the position, and although
only 6-5 he can really rebound.
Last year his main problems
were floor errors and outside
shooting as he spelled graduated
Rod Ford. Pressing Lockard will
be senior Steve Bazelon.
The first few days of prac-
tice emphasize conditioning.
Orr says it's "just to see how
they're going." He added, "Ba-
sically we're in pretty good
shape, especially the older play-
ers."
A long tough season awaits the
Wolverines especially in the Big
Ten where defending title hold-
er Ohio State, Minnesota, and
Purdue should provide for stiff
competition.

4

next Sunday, the brutal yet boyish
march to victory, over the slithering
rip-off U-Cellar. Veni, vici, ucelli!

1. Indiana at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Ohio State at Minnesota
3. Michigan State at Purdue
4. Northwestern at Illinois
, 5. Wisconsin at Iowa
6. Iowa State at Oklahoma
7. Oklahoma State at Kansas
8. Kansas State atMissouri
9. Colorado at Nebraska
10. USC at California

11.
12.
13.
S14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Libel squad will once again
things from the running dog
Stanford at Oregon State
Washington at UCLA
Georgia at South Carolina
Army at Miami of Florida
Florida State at Houston
Duke at Georgia Tech
Rice at Texas Tech
VMI at Maryland
Air Force at Arizona State
DAILY LIBELS vs.
ucellerdwellers

KEN BRADY (15) goes up to the basket in last year's game with Minnesota. Brady currently
has a knee injury and will not see much action for a while, but -Henry Wilmore (25) should
continue his high-scoring ways this year as the Wolverines hope to improve on last season's
second place finish.
MISTAKES HAUNT MICHIGAN:
heugers take double-di

Michigan Union Billiards

Free Instructions
Thurs., Oct. 28
7 p.m.-9 p.m.
Billiard Room

Free Exhibition
Nov. 4
4 p.m. and 8 p.m.
JIMMY CARAS
Union Ballroom

By CHUCK DRUKIS
For the third consecutive year,
Michifoin's ruggers have en-
countered the same problem -
the inability to win the big one.
Palmer College, a school of
chiropractors, dislocated a nor-
mally high scoring Blue attack
with well placed kicks on their
way to a 7-3 victory over Mich-
igan in Chicago this weekend,
one of two Wolverine losses this
weekend.
Michigan had been waiting for
another chance at Palmer after
a 14-11 loss last year. After Pal-
mer won the Windsor tourna-
ment over Labor Day, a Mich-
igan victory would have firmly
established Michigan as one of
the most outstanding teams in
the Midwest. But with the loss,
the age old theme of wait until
next year prevails.
However, despite the loss,
Michigan has nothing to be
ashamed of. The fixture w a s
hard fought and well played by
both teams.
Palmer committed very few
knock ons which allowed them

r

to consistently move the b a 11
forward. Michigan was again
plagued by mishandling the ball,
once they drove close to the
Palmer goal line. Nonetheless, a
stubborn Blue defense redeemed
the offense's mistakes with un-
penetrable goal line stands of
its own.
The Michigan scoring attack
was also hindered by injuries.
Pete Hooper, Michigan's second
leading scorer, pulled up lame
in the first half with a pulled
groin muscle. Ron Smith, t h e
Blue's outstanding wing, suf-
fered a severely strained ankle,
and thus Michigan lost his
breakaway speed. Consequently,
the Wolverines had to rely on
the forwards not only to get
the ball in the scrummages and
rucks, but also to move t h e
ball.
The Michigan Blue also play-
ed Chicago this weekend, losing
15-0.
The Lions faced a demoralized
Michigan team. Michigan h a d
thrashed Chicago 34-0 earlier in
the season, but the Blue t h is
time were unable to muster any
momentum. Moreover, . since
Michigan was playing Palmer
in Chicago, (Palmer College is
in Iowa), Chicago had asked at
the last moment to play Michi-
gan again, since the game had
not been scheduled earlier.
The Michigan Blue now have
a record of 5-3. The Gold, who
also lost this weekend, are 5-2,
while the Maize at 4-2.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

11

This weekend the ruggers will
play host to three teams. The
Blue will battle the Indiana
Hoosiers at 1:30 on Palmer Field.
Indiana, a team that has lost
several experienced players this
year, should provide stiff com-
petition to Michigan. The Gold
will play the Indiana "B" team
while the Maize will meet Wind-
sor at 12:00.
Vida cops
Cy Young

4

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Students International, 621 Church Street, Ann Arbor, 769-5790
open only to U-M faculty, staff, students & members of immediate family
Alumni should call our offices for flights available

NEW YORK () - Lefthander
Vida Blue of the Oakland A's,
who won 24 games in his first full
season in the major leagues, was
named winner yesterday of the
American League's 1971 Cy Young
Award.
The 22-year-old Blue, who
blazed his way to a 17-3 record
at the midseason All-Star break,
then tailed off to finish at 24-8,
became the youngest player ever
to win the premier pitching
award. Dean Chance, then of the
Los Angeles won it at 23 in 1964.
Blue, who led the league with
eight shutouts and a miagnificent
1.82 earned run average, landed
14 of the 24 first-place votes in
the Baseball Writers Association
of -America balloting.
He was also the onlyv pitcher
named on all 24 ballots, accumu-
lating 98 points, 13 more than
Mickey Lolich of the Detroit Ti-
gers, who received nine first-place
votes and appeared on all but one
of the ballots.
NEWSPAPERS
Friend of the
CONSUMERS
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

0

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Here's your chance to do something about the environment and win
$500 for your club or organization. Enter the Nabisco® Clean Sweep
Stakes, open to recognized student organizations.
Then clean up a pet eye-sore... river bank, vacant lot, street block,
whatever. The group that makes the cleanest sweep wins $500.
Entry blanks and rules are in the mail to campus organizations. Also
available at the Organizational Services Office in Michigan Union.
Contest closes midnight, October 31, 1971.

For the student body:
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Bells .......$8.50
DENIM

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Bush Jeans . $10.00
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