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October 27, 1971 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-27

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Pclge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 27, 1971

Page Two JHE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 27, 1971

Cauer, Janigro: Capturing
missing musical magnetism

By DAVE FRIEDO
The Chamber Orchestra of the
Saar performed a rousing con-
cert of mostly modern works last
night at Rackham Auditorium.
The orchestra from Saarbrucken.
Germany on its second tour of
the United States featured Ge-
sine Cauer as violin soloist in
the Concerto for Violin and Or-
chestra in G Major by Haydn
and conductor Antonio Janigro
as cello soloist in Hindemith's
Trauermusik for Violoncello and
String Orchestra.
Cauer played with authority
and with a rich, pure sound. Her
phrasing was lucid and Janigro
provided balance by dovetailing
the contrapuntal texture of the
string accompainment with the
solo passages. The resulting mu-
sical coherence provided the
kind of magneticism which is
missed in all but the absolutely
top concert groups today.
Janigro's deft handling of the
Hindemith Trauermusik added
another masterful touch to the
evening. The music is a fairly
even balance of solo and ensem-
ble, somber in quality and thick
in texture. Performed in four
movements without pause the
work ended quietly,
The most provocative work of
the evening was Gyorgy Liget's
Ramifications for Strings. It

was a piece consisting almost
solely of both subtle and con-
trasting plateaus of harmonics.
It is typical of the Hungarian
composer's style: a building of
motion through sliding densities
and colors.
The Divertimento for String
Orchestra by Bela Bartok fin-
ished the evening and it appear-
ed for one small moment at the
beginning of the Molto adagio
that the strain and monotony of

touring had taken a little verve
out of at least one string
player. Intonation and ensemble
suffered slightly but the orches-
tra's otherwise brilliant perform-
ance thrust the lost emotion into
the shadows.
The concert ended as it opened
-full of life and completely lack-
ing hesitation. The opening Con-
certo Grosso in D minor by Vi-
valdi was fast and exciting if
lacking in the excellence of en-
semble of the rest of the works.

The Place to Meet
INTERESTING People!
BACH CLUB
Presents:
BRASS QUINTET
playing
BACH, PURCELL, MOZART
& Even some Contemporary!
Refreshments:
Cinnamon Rolls & Cider
After the Performance
THURSDAY-8 P.M.
S. QUAD-'W. LOUNGE
ABSOLUTELY EVERYONE
INVITED
No Musical Knowledge Needed
Further Info-Sue-764-7894
John-482-5858

I

Program Information 8-6416

ALL LADIES
75c until
6 p.m.

SHOWS
TODAY
1, 3, 5, 7,
9 P.M.

-Daily-David Margolice

Shalom 72: A

tour of Israel

Shocking. Beautiful.
Brilliant. Sensual. Deadly
. . . and in the end,
only they will survive.
THE HELLSTROM
CHRONICLE

By HANNAH MORRISON
"Israel doesn't have 'shalom,'
peace, nor is it 1972 yet-but
we're optimistic," said Mike
Burstein, the Israeli motion pic-
ture and stage star who M.C.'d
last night's Shalom '72 program
at the Power Center.
T h a t optimism electrically
charged the entire performance
of musicians, dancers and sing-
ers, sponsored by the Israeli gov-
ernment.
"This isn't the typical Israeli
show," said Burstein. "We're not
out to sell ourselves, just to be
honest and cool."
Honesty and selling aside, the
show was vibrant and hard-hit-
ting, assaulting all the senses.
During each act, slides were
flashed simultaneously on the
eight screens in the background,
depicting Israel's cities, scenery
and people, as well as its anti-
quities and religious artifacts.

The purpose of Shalom '72 was
to offer a brief tour of Israel.
Shalom '72, accordingly, was a
mixed bag-a rock band, Druze
and Israeli dancers, and folk,
night club and Yemenite singers.
The show opened with a med-
ley played by the Lions of Ju-
dah, a five-man rock band from
Tel Aviv. They can compete with
any American rock group, in
terms of volume, rhythm and
sound effects-until the audience
abruptly realizes that they are
playing up-beat versions of two
"golden oldies"- Hebrew songs
whose origin cannot be traced.
They were followed by the
Amranim, two Yemenite broth-
ers also from Tel Aviv, who of-
fered a different language with
each of their songs - Arabic,
Yiddish and Hebrew. Playing a
Near East rendition of the Four
Tops, the Amranim had "soul,"
if that's the meaning of internal

The Alley presents
a lunchtime theater

rhythm and fine guitar picking.
As a switch back to native
Israeli culture, the Safta dance
troupe performed, composed of
young men and women from va-
rious kibbutzim in the Galilee
region of Israel. Though some
of the elaborate movements and
deep-knee bends were probably
improvised by the group, their
grace and lightness was credit-
able.
One of the highlights of the
evening was Shuli Nathan, a folk
singer who is famous for the
song "Jerusalem of Gold," in-
troduced shortly after the Six-
Day War.
Accompanied by a flute and
her own guitar playing, Nathan
can justly be called a "sweet
singer of Israel."
Another high point of the pro-
gram was Yaffa Yarkoni, who
has toured in Europe and this
country several t i m e s. Her
strong, belting voice, left the
audience with little doubt as to
why she has produced over 100
hit tunes.
But the most unique portion
of the program were the Druze
dancers, five men descended
ARM/ Michigan Film Society ]
_ THE
MALTESE
FALCON,
Humphrey Bogart
Sidney Greenstreet
Peter Lorre
Mary Astor
and Elisha Cook, Jr.
directed by John Huston
Snovel by Dashiell Hammett
O FRI.-SAT.
NOV. 5, NOV. 6
7:30-9:30
NAT. SCI. AUD.
$1.00-cont-.

from a mystical Arabic religious
sect. Wearing native costume,
they performed the debka, a
dance executed only by men for
joyous occasions. Accompanied
solely by a breathy flute player,
they stamped and shuffled with
absolute and eerie precision.
Shalom '72 ended with the en-
tire troupe singing a Hebrew
prayer, "Grant peace unto us
and all Israel." Shalom - also
meaning good-bye.
DIAL 5-6290
3rd WEEK
"I wouldn't say McCABE is more
enjoyable than M*A*S*H; it is
simply richer and better, a clas-
sic of its kind . . . be forewarn-
ed: the trick of appreciating
McCABE & MRS. MILLER is to
settle back and let it gurgle
over you.G
Neal Gabler--Michigan Daily
1~O

Science Fiction?

Big George is your
COMPONENT & STEREO
HEADQUARTER S

-A

No. Science Fact.
Rated G

By STEVE CHAPMAN
and JEFF WEISBERG
Folks who are into theatre
or film often find themselves in
Europe, crashing in cold water
flats. And such folks often
truck on down 'to the quaint
linoleum stalls-of the public
baths. Public baths are big in
Europe. So are lunch-time the-
atres. That's how Rusty Russ
,and Steve Faiginbaum started
talking about a lunch/theatre
set-up in Ann Arbor.
This week begins a series of
noontime shows at the Alley,
formerly Canterbury H o u s e.
.$1.25 brings you forty minutes
of entertainment in a non-aca-
demic atmosphere along with
soup,sandwich and coffee, cat-
ered by Mark's coffee house.
The performances start at 12:15
and 1:15, so students and work-
ers can easilyfit a one-act play
or a media event into an hour's
lunch break. Feed your head,
Today through Friday, look
for a bill of off-off-Broadway
one-acts: "Dr. Kheal" and
"Chicago". An eminent profes-
sor will lecture concerning the
cosmic truths, after which a
a man in a bathtub will talk
about corny virgins.
Next week, Nemo's Traveling
Troupe, featuring Jolin and Al-

lison Nemo, formerly of The
Floating Opera,- will perform
relaxed acoustic music.
The following week offers an
hour of dramatic readings from
Shakespeare and others, inter-
preted by Susan Parker Gold-
hammer,
November 16-19 bills "Man-
Poems" directed by Roy Mash.
an event of poetry, Day-Glo
painted dancers, and black light.
"Thetare willadd a different
dimension to the Alley's exist-
ant programs," says Faginbauip.
"It will also help us eat."
Groups can conteat Russ or
Faginbaum if they want to au-
dition an act.
The history leading up to the
series begins last -year when a
troupe of refugees from the
University Speech Department,
looking to evolve a personal,
innovative style of theatre, per-
formed "The New Chataqua"
at the Residential College Audi-
torium. Many of these actors
tourred England this summer
as the Ann Arbor Mime Troupe,
which gave birth to The Actor's
Guild, which recently staged
"The Killing of Sister George".
The rames change, the goal re-
mains. And some of the same
peonle are trying to make a
working proposition of lunch-
time theatre.

DYNA
A periodic loudspeaker system
compact, high performance two way high fidelity speak-
er system. Wide and very smooth frequency response,
oiled walnut cabinet.
each

WARREN
BEATTY
JULIE}
CHRISTIE
McCABE &
MRS. MILLER
PANAV3S1ON@ TECHNICOLOR®
Next
"DANCE OF DEATH"

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49995

WHAT YOU CAN DO
FOR
BANGLADESH
Telegram Sen. Griffin to support the Saxbe-Church
Amendment 51567 No. 159, to suspend aid to Pak-
istan till there is peace and safety in East Pakistan
(Bangladesh).
For further information or contributions of
time or money call 769-4819, 761 -8494, 763-
4382, or write to:
FRIENDS OF BANGLADESH
925 Church St., No. 5, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

1

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We Giv e Our Customer s Credit . ..

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483-9884
OPEN DAILY
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OCTOBER 28 (Thursday)
FRED BRANFMAN
(in Laos from March 1967 to February 1971 with Interna-
tional Voluntary Service) will speak of thej
Continuing U.S. Air War
in Indochina
based on his experience interviewing thousands of refugees

We Give Uur Custormers Servw-(.g Ti gD-
________ ~The MiChigan Daily
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27-4 P.M.
A LECTURE ON
~! I'f*I7bII.rL I'lrII IIII IiIdIr CI
DR. GERALD LARSON
Chairman, Dept. of Religious Studies
University of California at Santa Barbara
First in a series "DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE"
Ki\\/ A A D 1 r' i " I 111 AA/CTr-IC A"

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