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October 26, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-26

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 26, 1971

Page1111 Sx1 THE M ICHI.A. .A.LY

h.

SHOP WEDNESDAY 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 5:30 P.M.

Signing up the country's voters

CENTRAL STUDENT JUDICIARY
announces
Petitioning for 5 Full-Term
Appointments,
Sign up for Interviews-Oct. 1-Nov. 1
Room 1542 SAB

(Continued from Page 1)

izens' lobby organized by former

However, with most students Secretary of Health, Education and
t a k i n g an independent stance. Welfare John Gardner is one such
R o v e views registration as a group.
chance to educate voters, "to tell "We're not concerned as much
them about the worthwhile ac- with registering voters as we are
complishments of the Nixon ad- concerned about the lack of access
ministration" to the political processes," Mike
Thus the national committee Cole, a Common Cause worker,
works with local organizations in says.
p 1 a n n i n g drives by arranging To this end, Common Cause has
speakers and distributing litera- challenged state rules.which deny

fees. And sometimes, as in the
California and Kentucky cases, we;
Fact as one of the plaintiffs."
Working in a different direction
is the National Movement for the
Student Vote (The Student Vote.)
The group operates out of a cen-
tral Washington office and 11 field
offices, focusing on 283 4-year in-
stitutions with a special program
for 21 black colleges in the South.
"We have two approaches in
registering students," spokesman
Ed Roeder says. "We do publicity
work from the national o f f i c e,
while we sent out regional workers

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The major emphasis of the com-
mittee, Rove admits, is on reach-
ing non-student young voters, who
are more apt to vote Republican..
However, he says, this group is
harder to reach because they are
not centrally located on campuses.
The party has, however, picked
out 100 target counties throughout
the country where drives are plan-
ned, and has established a Youth
Council to investigate the interests
of young people.
Independent groups are also
working to maximize the impact
of the youth vote.}
Common Cause, the national cit-

However, Common Cause has to travel to campuses and help
worked mainly to enable college groups there."
students to vote in their college The group also provides the me-
towns. Litigation is proceeding in dia with information about youth
27 states, according to Cole, and registration and its success, in-
14 final and temporary decisions cluding a weekly column on reg-,
have been reached to date. istration. "The more the media,
The organization assumes a num- says it, the truer it becomes," Roe-
ber of stances in these cases. "We der says. "When students r e a d
act as a clearinghouse," Cole ex- about registration, more think the
plains, "providing briefs and texts student vote may have an impact,
of cases in other states which are so they go and register. It's a self-
hard to come by. We help provide perpetuating thing."
money for court costs and lawyers On campuses. the Student Vote

absentee ballots to civilian resi-
dents, restrictive convention dele-
gate selection procedures, a n d'
early closings of registration.

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either helps existing voter regis-
tration groups or helps establish
new ones. Many are called "coali-
tions," while others come up with
imaginative names such as the
Boulder Union to Register People
-BURP-at the University of Col-
orado in Boulder.
Field workers usually spend a
day on campuses and do a follow-
up check later. While the group
plans some big drives for the first
part of the year, its activities have
been limited by the short time-
stretch between the start of most
schools in later September and the
Oct. 2 registration deadline most
states had for the November elec-
tion.
The Americans for Democratic
For the student body:
FLARES
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Levi
Farah
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CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

Action ADA) and former New
York Congressman Allard Lowen-
stein got the jump on registering
however. In a series of "extrava-
ganzas" and youth conferences,
billed as "Registration Summer,"
the ADA registered new voters and
"surfaced" people who would help
with registration drives, according
to Art Kaminsky of the ADA staff.
At rallies so far, ADA has reg-
istered 150,000 young people, while
attracting more than 4,000 to two
three-day conferences held in sev-
en states.
Though the organization says it
is "bi-partisan," it is "different,"
Kaminsky says, "because it is
issue-oriented."
"We're anti-war, anti-Nixon," he
explains. "Millions of young voters
won't register unless they are
given a reason to, unless they can
see the impact they can have."
Using "community organization"
approaches developed by Saul Al-
insky, the Youth Citizenship Fund
also helps communities with regis-
tration efforts.
"We only go into an area if no
one is working there or if our help
is requested and our research in-
dicates we could do some good,"
says spokeswoman Leslie Smith,
The Fund tries to maintain "a
low profile," working to set up
committees for registration or try-
ing to get mobile and branch regis-
tration sites established at schools
or factories.
"To go in and say, 'we're the
national group from Washington'
only causes chaos and conflict,"
Smith says. "We did that once and
have learned from our mistakes."
However, so far the groups have ,
had little impact locally, according
to Roger Wilner, Ann Arbor Dem-
ocratic Party Vice-chairman for
voter services.
Wilner, who has been actively
involved in local registration ef-
forts, says many of the groups "are
letterhead organizations without i
much to offer local groups except
lobbying in Washington and pub-
licity."
The local need, Wilner says, is
to develop better procedures for
registration. "Most of the groups
haven't devoted themselves suffic-
iently to this problem."
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