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October 26, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TON IGHT
AT 7and 9

(4 1'

DIAL 8-6416
HELD OVER!

news briefs
By The Associated Press

CI E

Sictpi~jan

Ilailit

,'

Tuesday, October 26, 1971 Page Three
Death toll'mounts as tensions
rise on India-Pakistan border

HELLSTROM CHRONICLE!
LAST TIMES TONIGHT!

"A UNIQUE AND
OFTEN STUNNING
SPECTACLE!"
-Time Magazine

i

"AN ULTIMATE
EXPERI ENCE"
S. FISK-Mich. Daily
VANESSA REDGRAVE
OLIVER REED
KEN RUSSELL'S FILM
11E DEVILS
TON ITE
7&9
DAYS ON LY!
FEA TURE

SOVIET LEADER Leonid Brezhnev made an indirect appeal
yesterday for a friendship treaty with France as he began a six-
day visit in that country.
In Paris, heavy security precautions were in force, and helmeted
riot police armed with clubs fought running battles with demon-
strators who burned Soviet flags and shouted "Brezhnev assassin."
* *
AN ANTI-WAR Veterans Day march in Kileen, Texas, re-
sulted in the arrests of 100 servicemen, their wives, and sup-j
porters.
The placard-carrying marchers, who had applied for and been
denied a parade permit, had paraded about a block when dozens of
police moved in and began making arrests,
* * *
EXPLOSION of a dynamite bomb caused extensive damage
to headquarters of the Detroit Police Officers Association yester-
day in the mid-city New Center area.
While no one was injured, Inspector William Norris said the
blast was "obviously an attempt to assassinate police officers"{
and security measures were beefed up at all police precinct stations 1
and bureaus.
* ,.~ *
A DYNAMITE PACKING building blew up Monday on the
property of the Independent Explosive Co. in Dupont, Pa. A ton
of dynamite was set off, state police said.
The blast levelled the one-story structure and injured 3 em-
ployees. State police also report 3 employees missing.
,* * * .
ABOUT 90 SOVIET JEWS were detained by security police
yesterday when they gathered at Communist Party Central Com-
mittee headquarters in Moscow to present petitions demanding
permission to emigrate to Israel, Jewish sources reported.
Some Baltic Jews among the petitioners were believed to be sent
home and were unable to contact their friends in Moscow before'
leaving. The friends were unable to say what happened to them
or how long they were held.
SOUTH VIETNAM'S government ordered $725,000 made
available to aid victims of Typhoon Hester as officials reported
103 persons dead or missing in the wake of the storm.
Officials described the damage as catastrophic and indicated
Sthatseveral hundred thousand of the northern region's three million
people were left homeless.

O PiPTH POrUM,
FIFTH AVENUE AT LBERTY
DOWNOTOWN ANN ARBURi
INFORMYATION 761-$700
STARTS WEDS. 4
BIG DOUBLE

-Associated Press
Making plans
Soviet party chief Leonid Brezhnev (right foreground) talks with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko witheFrench President Georges Pompidou between them after Brezhnev's arrival yes-
terday. (See News Briefs)
PONTIAC ABSENTEEISM HIGH:
State school boycott begins

THE GREEK Public Order Ministry announced yesterday PONTIAC, Mich. (,) - Ab- lence between black and w h i t e
the arrest of 36 persons for subversive and terrorist activities. The senteeism was reported to be about students.
arrest include 2 top leaders of the outlawed Greek Government two or three times above the norm- The Pontiac Press said a spot
Party, Haralambos Drakopoulos and Dimitrios Partsalides. al yesterday in Pontiac area check of schools in its area show-
The ministry did not disclose the fate of the 36 arrested, but it schools after an .anti-busing group ed that attendance was down at
was understood that investigations were continuing and that more called for a statewide boycott of Northern High School by 678,
arrests will follow classrooms. compared with a normal absentee-
ae*looThe boycott, called Sunday by ism of 300 for a Monday; down
Irene McCabe, head of the Na- at Kennedy Junior High by 379
TWO JAPANESE express passenger trains collided head on tional Action Group (NAG), is in against a normal 132; and down
in a tunnel yesterday, killing 23 persons and injuring 188, rail- response to police reports in Pon- at Lincoln Junior High by 272,
road officials reported. tiac citing higher incidents of vio- against 100.
NEW MARIJUANA PROPOSAL
Legislature reconvenes to face major b ls

Also-2ND BIG HIT!
"Beautifully Filmed Erotic Story'
-William Wof, Cue Magazine

In nearby Waterford Mott
High School, one-half of the
normal attendance of about 700
students showed up. Waterford
Township High reported about 35
per cent absenteeism and Water-
ford Kettering about 45 per cent
absenteeism.
In other sections of the s t a t e,
however, reports from scattered
school districts indicated that the
boycott was being ignored.
School officials in Kalamazoo
and Flint reported that classroom
attendance was normal for a Mon-
day.
The Pontiac police report issued
last week showed that since bus-
ing began in the school system
this year, incidents involving black
and white students that h a v e
caused police to be called in have
risen.
McCabe called for the boycott
for an "indefinite" period of time
until children in the s c h o o1s s
were guaranteed "that there life

Dacca, Pakistan ( - The
Pakistan military claimed
yesterday that 147 persons
were killed in fighting in East
Pakistan, where informed
unofficial sources said both
India and Pakistan were us-
ing airplanes to protect bor-
der positions.
According to official sources,
the Pakistani army killed 73 in-
truders, some of whom were de-
scribed as Indian soldiers, in
fighting off two battalion-sized at-
tempts to cross the border in the
Mymensingh district, north of
here.. The Pakistanis gave no in-
dication of their own casualties.
During the fighting, India's
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi de-
nounced the leadership, of Paki-
stan as "military hoodlums" and
said actions will be taken to -pro-
tect India's own security and sta-
bility.
Gandhi warned that her coun-
try could no longer cope with the
millions of refugees crossing into
India, "jeopardizing my country's
stability and integrity."
She urged the Pakistan govern-
ment to let the refugees return,
to give meaning to elections in the
eastern province.
the Pakistan army reported in
addition to troops suspected of
being members of the Mukhti Ba-
hini - the Bangla Desh rebel
army - some bodies were found
with Indian military identity
discs.
The Pakistanis also claimed 67
civilians, many of them women
and children, were killed in what
the military said was shelling on
four border locations from India.
The Pakistanis claimed 2,200
rounds were fired yesterday.
The casualties bring the total
reported since fighting erupted
last March to about 2,000 - most
of them in September and Octo-
ber.
Informed sources said the Paki-
stanis and Indians both were us-
ing planes near the border area
around Comilla, east of here.
A military source said the
troop assault'was accompanied by
an artillery bombardment.
He added that several Indian
soldiers and a large quantity of
arms and ammunition were cap-
tured by Pakistani forces.
Another source claimed that
Indian attempts to capture Kasba,
a small township on the Comilla-
Tripura border east of Dacca,
were foiled yesterday: Indian ag-
ents, border forces and artillery
units were said to have suffered
438 dead and at least 10 wound-
ed.
The source said the captured
arms included machineguns, rifles,
mortars and hand grenades.
In Rawalpindi, President Agha
Mohammed Yahya Khan of Paki-
stan was reported to have asked
United Nations Secretary-General
U Thant to visit India and Paki-
stan in the hopes of arranging a
mutual withdrawal of forces from
the frontiers. Yahya Khan, who
apparently was replying to a let-
ter from Thant, suggested that
U.N. observers oversee the with-
drawals.

"BRILLIANT!"
-Saturday Review

"STUNNING!"
-Glamour

LANSING (P) - State legis-
lators reconvene at the Capitol
today after a bitterly protract-
ed summer-long session that
ended Sept. 10.
Principal chores include final
action on the $500 million plus
welfare bill to fill the last hole
in the year's $2.05 billion total
budget, plus consideration of
the House-passed drug bill.
Marijuana possession, under
the new drug bill, would be re-
duced from a felony to a mis-
demeanor. The present 20-year
sentence for use and sale of

marijuana would be eliminated
and, under the House version,
the first offense would call for
90 days in jail and a possible
$500 fine.
A controversial bill to update
and revise the state's entire
criminal law code may also get
its first floor test when the Leg-
islature reconvenes.
Little opposition is expected
to these provisions weeding out
of criminal law some archaic
statutes, some of which date
back to 1846, on which the pre-
sent criminal code was built.

But a large amount of debate
is expected over a provision
that would introduce indetermi-
nate sentencing and would take
away from judges their present
power to set both minimum and
maximum terms, except in the
possibility of first and second
degree murder convictions.
Measures contained in the
criminal law bill includes:
-Retaining the judge's power
to fix a minimum and maxi-
mum term in first-degree and
second-degree murder convic-
tions of 20 years to life in the
first instance and 10 years to
life in the second;
-Permit homosexual activity
between consenting adults in
private;

-Delete adultery from the
crime list;
-Revise statutory treatment
of crimes dealing with rape,
pornography, and certain types
of theft; and
-Redefine the power of a
police officer to use deadly
force in felony arrests.
Another bill would allow any
woman, pregnant no more than
three months, to have an abor-
tion in the state if she were a
resident of the state at least
that long.
Other issues include mass
transportation, new construc-
tion codes, snowmobile ordi-
nances, and Detroit stadium
funding proposals.

American Theatre League of Toledo Presents
So that no man, woman or child need miss the most important
musical experience of a lifetime, we have been authorized by
the Robert Stigwood Organization to add two additional per-
formances on Monday, Nov. I and Tuesday, Nov. 2 of

w

Let us help you:
PLAN AHEAD
To Become a CPA
THE BECKER
CPA REVIEW COURSE
313-961-1400
Our Successful Students Represent

i

MAOR Theater presents
The Newcomers
A DRAMA OF SURVIVORS OF THE
CONCENTRATION CAMP
by JON BERSTEIN
Saturday and Sunday at Hillel-1429 Hill-8 P.M.-$1

would not be in danger by attend-
ing their classes."
Pontiac police said that they
could not immediately confirm
the 358 incidents figure that
McCabe gave fellow NAG mem-
bers at the Sunday rally.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann .Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates; $5 by carrier, $6 by mall.
Ann
just back

JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR,

'

Tompkins
from 5 years in China
speaks on
alism in China "

, , ;

II

Lyrics by
Tim Rice

Music by
Andrew Lloyd Webber

THURS.
OCT. 28
FRI.
OCT. 29
SAT.
OCT. 30

HOMECOMING 1971
"LET'S WORK TOGETHER"
PRESENTS
THE PHENOMAL
PINK FLOYD
PARLIAMENT
FUNKADELIC
QUICKSILVER

A
&'

3.50
$1-2-3
2-3 .50
4-4.50

TODAY 1-3 p.m.

i

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT ONLY-TUESDAY, OCT. 26
THE CRANES
ARE FLYING
dir. MIKHAIL KULATOZOV, 1957
One of t-he most acclaimed Soviet films of all time."The. Cranes
Are Flying" wan the GRAND PRIZE for BEST PICTURE and the
Gold Palm for BEST DIRECTOR and BEST ACTRESS at the 1957

Angell Hall; Aud. B
SPONSORED BY DEPT. OF JOURNALISM
AND CENTER FOR COINESE STUDIES

"Journ

TOLEDO MASONIC AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY THRU TUESDAY OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 2
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE
Saturday and Sunday 2:30; Orch. $5.50, $4.50; Loge $5.50; Bal. $4.00, $3.00
Tickets-Sunday 7:30. Monday and Tuesday 8:30. Orch. $7.00, $5.50; Loge $7.00; Bal.

I

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