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October 24, 1971 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-24

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October, 24, 19711

50TH ANNIVERSARY

Ed school
Educators from all over the
world have been 'attending a
four day series of meetings and
workshop at the School of Edu-
cation to celebrate its fiftieth
anniversary.
The teachers, professionals,
and administrators are examin-
ing some of the problems mod-
ern day educators face, includ-
ing urban schooling, teacher
unionization, and educational
colonialism.
Six well known educators,
conducting a panel - audience
discussion along with their in-
dividual presentations, stressed
the need for change in the ur-
ban school systems though they
disagreed on whether it should
be a total overhauling of the
system or should concentrate
on the personal level.
R. Bruce McPherson, super-
intendent of the Ann Arbor
Schools argued for a total re-
formation of the school sys-
tems on the grounds that mi-
hority schools need minority
values, whereas presently the __
entire school system is based opened by or
only on white middle class val- She further er
ues. portant role
On the individual level Rev, can playin
Malcolm Carron, University of change citing
Detroit president, said' teachers the active rol
have got to "get it together in federation in
the way of leadership," to get decision which
things done. Herman Bozeman, schools segregE
dean of an all black college, Speaking for
foresaw a lack of teachers with Phelps, admin
a knowledge of society, and a for education
willingness to be held respon- office, remark
sible for the growth of their stu- recent state
dents. ments such as
The scope and implications of of the property
collective bargaining for teach- for financing
ers was also discussed by a pan- Representati
el of teachers and administra- Kuwait, Paris,
tors. United Nation
Detroit Federation of Teach- problems of
ers President Mary Riodaii developing thi
stressed the importance of the primarily in
wide power which would be tion.

holds workshops

U.S. and England, Prof. John
Raynor of the Open University
of the United Kingdom con-
tended that neither the U.S. or
the United Kingdom have free
school systems.
Although progressive educa-
tion in the US and England
never got to first base, one op-
timistic teacher said a creative
teacher is not limited to four
walls.
One doesn't need lot of ex-
pensive equipment to make a
classroom open, she said, just a
creative teacher, willing and
able to give the necessary time
and talent to the education of
children as individuals.
"The Student Perspective of
Classroom, School and Society"
was the topic of another one of
several panel discussions held.
Theodore Newcomb. Residen-
tial College associate director
opened the discussion with com-
ments concerning the criticism
received by such educational
institutions today. He explained
that residential colleges try to
be moreaware of this criticism
and at the same time give the
students "more responsibility
for their own education".
Comments were then heard
from each of the three panel
members on Newcomb's state-
ment and their own personal
views. Ann Arbor Board of Edu-
cation member Paul Carring-
ton spoke of a program begun
two weeks ago at Ann Arbor
Pioneer High School similar to
the Residential College called
"Pioneer Two." He termed it as
an "open-ended high school
program" that was developed
by unsatisfied Pioneer students.
This article was compiled by Daily
reporters Kevin Behrens, Dave Bur-
henn, Peter Campbell, Katie Mc-
Carthy, and Sue Stephenson.

CALIFORNIA PANTS
PRESENTS ITS
. PRE -CHRISTMAS
* WE ARE IT PAYS
* GIVING YOU TO
* AWAY SHOP
MONEY! HERE!
*AE
*The General will personally give you a KENNEDY 50c .PIECE with each and
* every purchase. Make as many single purchases as you wish! SALE DAYS
Oct. 21 thru Nov. 4 INSTEAD OF MARKING THE PRICE DOWN WE WILL
HAND YOU A 50c PIECE!
* A

-Daily-Tom Gottlieb
Education school workshop

ganizing teachers.
phasized the im-
teacher alliances
effecting social
as an example
e played by the
the recent court
declared Detroit
ated.
r the state, James
istrative assistant
for the governors
:ed primarily on
funding develop-
possible abolition
y tax as a means
education.
ves from India,
the U.S. and the
ns discussed the
westernization of
rd world nations,
terms of educa-
.

The problem of viewing de-
velopment not solely as a tech-
nical issue, but as a moral and
"value-laden" issue as well, gen-
erated a lot of discussion.
Syracuse University educa-
tion Prof. Gordon Ruscoe said
that ideological control, result-
ing from developing nations
copying Western ideas, is diffi-
cult to avoid. He said that a de-
veloping nation must ask what
it "wants from its life" before
deciding what kind of develop-
ment is needed.
Indian representative J.N.
Kaul questioned whether many
of the adverse conditions cre-
ated in developing nations re-
sult from the natural conse-
quences of development, rather
than from Western influence.
During a group discussion of
the open classroom in both the

Ed school attempts to admit blacks

(Continued from Page 6)
maintains flexible standards on,
- the grade point averages of appli-
cants. The cutoff, he says, is be-
tween 2.5 and 2.75 for students
who meet the other standards as
well. But the Black Caucus main-
tains that this is not flexible
enough to insure fairness to mi-
nority group applicants.
Dungy claims that the entrance
criteria now used discriminates
against "any non-caucasian," who
might not have been able to per-
form as well in, a junior college
whose programs were geared to-
ward more affluent, white stu-
dents.
The Black Caucus, Dungy says,
is now drafting up tests and meth-
ods that it believes would be valid
for judging minority groups stu-
dents.
The lack of funds within the
education school for providing
financial aid to students raises
additional problems for recruiters,
Dungy says. Presently, all money
for this purpose must come from
the University's Oppor-
tunity Awards Program.
This program is being given
funds that will help the Univer-
sity reach a 10 per cent level of
minority students by 1973-74.
But the education school is com-
mited to a 20 per cent level, and
Dungy points out that financial
aid for this additional 10 per cent
will have to come 'from some oth-
er source.
The Black Caucus is now work-
ing out the methods for utilizing
such funds once they are. made
available to them, Dungy adds
Meanwhile, recruitment of new
faculty members is not possible
unless there are positions for them
to fill, Cohen says. And the only
way to get more positions is to

add more new programs - which
the school's tight budget will not
allov.
Most of the faculty members in
the school have tenure, and even
if a professor could be released,
Cohenradds, it would require one
year from the term of notifica-
tion to take effect.
Another development that has
hurt the education school's mi-
nority admissions efforts has been
the cut-ba'k in federal money for
minority - oriented programs, ac-
cording to Loving.
The Childhood Development
Consultant Program lost its fel-
lowships this year and had to
fold, and the UrbannEducation
Program will take on no new stu-
dents this year, Loving says.
While the outlook for the future
is uncertain, education school of-
ficials point out that they were,
able to achieve at least a 10 perj
cent level in half the time it is
expected to take the rest of the
University.
According to officials in the
Opportunity Awards Program, the
school has always been relatively
popular with minority group stu-
dents. Seeing an - opportunity to
help their communities, minority
students were attracted to the1
education school even before the
University adopted its minority
admissions plan.
But since the BAM strike, the
education school has had to com-
pete with other schools and col-
leges for black students. And un-
less the school revises its budget
BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBALL
UNION

to give the 20 per cent goal a
higher priority, Dungy says, the
achievement of that percentage is
unrealistic.
As Loving now sees it, the ques-
tion is "whether white faculty
members accepted demands of
blacks out of fear or whether it
was out of a sincere desire to in-
crease the numbers of blacks."
Cohen responds that he has
supported the admissions pro-
grams because "in our state with
the need for a greater percentage
of black students and black fac-
ulty members, I felt it was the
right thing to do."
The program was conceived at
a student-faculty conference in
September, 1969. At that time,
nine demands were drawn up in
the form of a position paper,
Early Show 5 p.m.
S AIJ.A, ANGELL HALL

which basically called for the
"immediate implementation of
measures" necessary to achieve 20
per cent minority group mem-
bers in all ranks of student and
faculty. And in November, the
education school faculty, voted
67-11 to accept the demands.
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