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October 24, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-24

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Sunday, October 24, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DRILY

Page Seven

Sunday, October 24, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

CAMPUS TR ANSPORTATION

Buses:
By SUE STEPHENSON
"It's great . . . except for the
morning rush, the noon rush,
and going to and coming from
classes."
"I don't see much wrong with
it . . a ten minute wait, so
what! The service is adequate
at the meal times. It's not too
good at night, but that doesn't
really bother me, because I
don't use it that often."
"Very irregular . .. I've wait-
ed through three Northwood
bound buses for a Bursley-Baits
one,",
For most North Campus resi-
dents who rely on the Univer-
sity - operated bus system for
daily transportation, the buses
are one of life's minor irrita-
tions.
According to William Gaffney,
assistant manager of the, Uni-
versity Transportation Depart-
ment, the primary purpose of
the bus service is to "get the stu-
dents to their classes."
He explained that this in-
volves two types of students:
those who live on North Cam-
pus, and commuters who park
their cars in the Crisler Arena
parking lot.
The transportation department

One of life's irritations

operates a fleet of 30 buses. Dur-
ing the day, the three main
routes are:
-A Bursley-Baits route be-
tween north and central cam-
pus;
--A Northwood Apartments
route between north and cen-
tral campus; and,
-A commuter route between
the Crisler Arena parking lot
and central campus.
On weekends and at night the
three routes are combined into
one.
All routes coincide at the bus
stop on North University street,
where riders may transfer
buses.
The buses are free for their
users and are paid for out of a
half-million dollar general fund
allocation.
Last year, the service had 19
buses running continually
throughout the day. This year
there are only eight buses run-
ning continually, with an ad-
ditional six to eight buses on
the road at busy periods.
The reduction has resulted in
a savings to the University of
about $300 to $400 weekly, ac-
cording to Gaffney.
An informal sampling by The

Daily showed that students
have five main complaints about
the bus services:
There are times during the
day when there are just not
enough buses to go around.
causing serious overcrowding.
The worst time, according to
students, is at 7:45 a.m.
Service is "lousy" on weekends
and at night. The transporta-
tion department readily con-
cedes that only one bus is on
duty from 10:00 p.m. to 1:35
a.m. to service the 6,000 resi-
dents of north campus.
Buses stop running 25 min-
utes before the popular Under-
graduate library closes for the
night. This "just doesn't make
any sense," said one student
who studied until 2:00 a.m. at
the UGLI only to find no more
bus service.
There are too few bus stops.
Many students would like the
bus to stop on Fletcher at the
corner of Washington, so those
with classes at the Frieze build-
ing need not double back to get
to class;
In the winter, waiting for the
bus can not only be time con-
suming but also cold, Veteran
users of the bus service wonder

why the University cannot pro-
vide enclosed heated bus shel-
tes instead of the exposed
bus stops.
In response to the first com-
plaint, about morning over-
crowding Gaffney suggested two
remedies: 1) get up earlier to
beat the morning rush, and 2)
squeeze onto a crowded bus.
Gaffney said the reason for
poor service on weekends and
at night was simply a lack of
money. "Cutbacks had to be
made somewhere," he said.
According to the bus drivers
last year, the only kind of peo-
ple who rode the bus at two in
the morning were -drunks, guys
looking for a fight, and girls
wanting to be "picked-up",
Gaffney said.
Since there didn't seem to be
a need to serve the-library-type
student and since cut-backs
were necessary, the service was
terminated at 1:35 a.m. this
year as opposed to 2:15 a.m.
last year, he said.
The number of bus stops can-
not be increased, Gaffney said,
because the city complains
about traffic tie-ups and com-
petition with the city bus serv-
ice,
The reason the bus stops
aren't heated, he said, is two-
fold. First, extra funds would
be required to install an en-
closure, and secondly, an en-
closed shelter would increase
the possibility of rape.
Detroit has enclosed and
heated some of its bus stops,
and the result has been an in-
crease in rapes, Gaffney said.

:..:Bouffant Hair Fashion
and
Afro Shaping and Styling
668-9356 307 S. Fifth Ave,
Eves. 662-8401 Closed Mon, and Wed,
An invitation to meet the members
of the Israel Dance Shalom '72
at an open reception
H HILLEL SOCIAL HALL
Monday evening, Oct. 25th, 8:00 p.m.

EVERYONE WELCOME

REFRESHMENTS FREE

Alternative sought for drug

(Continued from Page 3)
Food and Drug Administration
said in an interview the FDA may
change this "relatively soon .. .
possibly within the next several
months."
So far, he said, four methadone
maintenance projects have been
ordered closed and at least two
more will be closed for violating
rules on clinical experiments with
the drug.
In most of the closures, Gard-
ner said. FDA inspectors had
found evidence of methadone be-
ing "sold in the streets" by meth-
adone treated addicts.
He said that methadone-admin-
istered orally in an orange drink
in approved projects-does not

produce a euphoric "high." But signed to prevent heroin and other
a "high" can result if it is in- narcotics from reaching the ner-
jected. Although most varieties of vous system.
methadone are difficult to convert Also, unlike methadone, the an-

to an injectable forms, some ad-
dicts have learned how to do it by
such methods as distillation, he
said.
No lift is produced, however, by
narcotic antagonists, which the
drug industry wants to develop.
The aim of the proposed new
drug industry - government re-
search alliance is to perfect "long-
lasting, effective and non-addict-
ing narcotic blocking. agents .
which would~provide ...a major;
first step in the conquest of hero-
in addiction."
The antagonists are drugs de-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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tagonists are non-narcotic and
non-addicting.
Research to find antagonists is
already going on in a few Amer-
icar laboratories.
But both C. Joseph Stetler,
president of the Pharmaceutical
Manufacturers' Association, and
Thomas Rauch, president of
Smith Kline & French Labora-
tories, in announcing the drug
industry proposal, cautioned the
public against expecting any early
breakthroughs.
"We do not see the miracle
drug to cure addiction as a near-
term possibility," Rauch told a
congressional subcommittee in
August.
The drug industry research
combine would also explore fur-
ther:
-The possibility of encasing
antagonists in plastics or other
materials, and then implanting
them inside an addict's body-for
slow release over a long period of
time.
-The possibility of developing
a kind of "vaccine" against hero-
in addiction-an idea already be-
ing investigated by New York
City municipal scientists.

-

I
..
I

I

DAILY CLASSIF EDS BRING RESULTS--USE THEM
UAC presents the
Organization of a
New Student Art Gallery
ALL
Artists interested in Display
Students interested in Staffing
Students interested in Helping
CALL
UAC-763-1107
or
Come to UAC Offices Mon.-Fri.
12:30-4:30

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
' Farah
* Wright
t Lee
Male
CHECKMATE
Stae Street at liberty

a :
e.
INESE, ANRES PA
GRE NS, ING ,°N RI
AT R 600DS M oE ME SS
N TW r-t-m
- MPTED) TO _
(j ~ e
( 9~L

SUNDAYS OCTOBER 24

ments for interviews with the follow-
it nrt f rgnzatiio smay oe ~nmne De-.

f ~ inning Mon., the 28th. Call 763-1362
Ity~ t4l&e1ItL or stop in our office.
TV Center Film: "Understanding Mon., .Nov. 1, Case Western Reserve
Money: Savings on Savings," WWJ-TV, Univ. Law Bch., Nov.' 2, Dun & Brad-
Channel 4, Noon. 3street; Thunderbird School of Inter-;
UAC Controversy Series: David Har- national Mgmt.; Montgomery Ward;
ria. draft resister, Hill Aud., 2 pm. !Duke Univ. Law Sch.; .National Cash
#iemorial Conisert:' M. 'Mayerson !Register; Nov. 3, Women's Army Corp.;
violin, G. Reynolds. piano, honoring lPrudential Life Onsur.; Michigan Civil
the: late Allen L. Mayerson, prof, of Serv.. Nov. 4, O'Neils; Sears Roebuck
"!nathemuiwtics and insurance, Aud. A. I& Co.; Women's Army Corp.; Univ. of
Angell Hell, 2 pm. Chicago Law Sch.; Nov. 5, Detroit Bank
School of Music: Mary Kruzas. clar- ;& Trust; Upjohn Co. (sales)
inet, Sch. of Music Recital Hall, 2:30

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

iq

pm.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 25
Physics Seminar: T. Kalogeropoulos,
Syracuse, Interesting Observations in
dip Annlihilations at Rest," P&A Cal-
loqi. Rim. 4 pm.
History, Romance Lang. & Lit., and
Near E. Lang. & Lit.: G. Hourani,
SUNV at Buffalo, "Intellectual Life in
Medieval Andalusia," 200'-Lane Hall,I
4:10 pm
Scho 1of Music: composers Forum,
Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 8 pm.
SPlacement Service
INTERVIEWS AT C.P.P. Appoint-

SENIORS: If you haven't already
registered at CPP. stop up and see
what we have to offer. It's really not
too early to start job hunting!
The following schools will interview
prospective teachers in our office dur-
ing month of November. Interview ap-
pointments made by calling 764-7459
or at Career Planning &nPlacement
through Edu. Div. Receptionist on
c Monday of week before the interview
date.
Nov. 1
New Lothrop. Mi.Spanish/English only
Nov. 9
Midland. Mi.
{Nov. 18
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Indian Schools-Elem only

TAKE A

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"FUNNY, IN A NEW AND FRIGHTENING WAY!"
-NEWSWEEK
"DEVASTATINGLY FUNNY AND COMICALLY
DEVASTATING! A HOWL OF LAUGHTER!"
--Judith Crist, NBC-TV

_"Q.."

JULES FEIFFER'S

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SEATING IS LIMITED-to assure
sion please purchase tickets well

adimis-
in ad-

1

vance.
ALL SEATS RESERVED-Student rates 75c
Ticket Sales:
FISHBOWL - M-F, 9-3
Remaining tickets will be sold on Monday-Tuesday ot Power
Center from 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 26 at Power Center
7:30--ISRAEL NO.W
Israeli representatives will be present to provide information on
programs in ISRAEL: Hebrew Study. Kibbutz, University. Jobs,

2Oth+w"W CnfyFprese ts
RI JULES EIFFFER S II IL
a.u~ *,MIRCIWA RODa,sI,.YiNClXN ARONLUZABITH WILSON MONKORKIEA *
a AM RK «.eJAK8R30KYk, kJUEFIii R WSP d R lFKi.\

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