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October 22, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-22

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10-7 MON.-THURS.
10-9 FRI., SAT.
The wine £Zh11pe
347 Maynard St.
PURVEYOR OF THE WORLD'S FINEST WINES

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, October 22, 1971

_ UI! ._~

Box Office Open at 6:30
Show Starts at Dusk!

9

Those Babysitters Are Back to Back!
2 Showings of Each Feature Every Night
SHE CAME p SHE CAME TO SIT WITH
TO SIT WITH BABY BABY... AND WENT AWAY
Ind ENDED UP L WITH DAOOY!
WITH DADDY! UCROW NERNTINA PCTURES pNses
\bab itter BABYSWITTHER
A CROWN-INTERNATIONALAT R Cm
PICTURES RELEASE ADUNDEERUC C
A CROWN INTERNATONAL.PICTURES RELEASE

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i~ 5
news briefs
By The Associated Press
SOUTH VIETNAM'S army says it has taken control of some
60 square miles in eastern Cambodia and that recent Communist
attacks between Saigon and the frontier are just "noise to cover
the defeat of North Vietnamese forces."
A North Vietnamese push in the border region 60 to 90 miles:
northwest of Saigon began nearly four weeks ago. But in the last
week hostilities have dwindled to small skirmishes, and enemy shell-
ings with Allied air and artillery retaliation.
* * *
THE SENATE is preparing to debate a new effort to force i
withdrawal from Indochina but the Foreign Relations Committee
chairman J. William Fulbright says he doubts President Nixon will
pay attention even if it passed.
The new proposal, calling for total U.S. withdrawal within sixI
months and barring funds except to pull out, was included Wednesday
by the Foreign Relations panel in a $3.2 billion foreign-aid authoriza-
tion bill. The vote adding it was 11 to 5.
SOVIET U.N. AMBASSADOR Jacob Malik, angry at a shoot-
ing attack on the Soviet U.N. Mission, accused the United States
yesterday of failing in its obligation to protect Russian diplomats
stationed in New York.
Malik accused the Jewish Defense League of firing the shots and
said the JDL's leader, Rabbi Meir Kahane, may have planned the
attack on instructions from Israel.
FEDERAL MEDIATORS are pressing to reopen deadlocked
negotiations in the three-week-old strike of 80,000 miners that
has virtually halted U.S. soft-coal production.
The steel industry, which has a large stake in the coal nego-
tiations, and, the coal-burning public utility firms reportedly have.
ample stockpiles for several more weeks, but railroads that haul'
coal have suffered large revenue losses from the strike.

U.S. rolls back
propan rates of
ree oil firms
WASHINGTON (U) - The government has succeeded in
forcing down all propane gas price increases posted by major
oil companies in the Southwest, it was learned last night.
The Cost of Living Council is preparing to announce to-
day that the oil firms have agreed to roll back posted price
boosts amounting to close to $100 million on an annual basis.
Already, the council has won price rollbacks from three
Texas firms. One, Wanda Petroleum Co., Houston, announced
its rollback Wednesday. Two others, Sid Richardson Gasoline
Co., Fort Worth and Diamond Shamrock Corp., Amarillo,
agreed yesterday to the rollbacks.
As the council prepared to move, the government an-
nounced that national personal income showed a moderate
rise in September, showing - - -
that President Nixon's wage- s
price freeze has taken hold.Literature
The Commerce Department re-
T e C m ec De at e t r -'ported that personal income in-
creased by $3.2 billion last month,
mainly on the strength of rises in r1Ze 0 U
farm income and railroad retire-
ment pensions.I
Meanwhile, the White .House
announced it will name this week
the members of the pay and price

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Stacy Faye
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-Associated Press
Gravel, MPS' picket White House
Sen. Gravel protests
planned atomic tests
WASHINGTON 1 - The White House, a mecca for pro-
testers, had some unusual pickets yesterday: a U.S. senator

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION

panels that will administer the
post-freeze economic controls. The
names will be "very likely" an-
nounced Friday, press secretary
Ronald L. Ziegler said.
The White House is reaching
into the academic community for
some of 'the key spots, and has
selected Dr. C. Jackson Grayson,
head of the Business School at
Southern Methodist University,

FOURTEEN INMATES of the Cassidy Lake Technical School and two members of Canada's Parliament.
have walked away from the minimum security facility since a But unlike other sign carriers, Set

n. Mike Gravel of

disturbance there Sunday.

Alaska and the Canadians trotted the Pennsylvania Ave.

A 90-minute disturbance Sunday night by about 150 of 450 in- sidewalk for only 25 minutes before packing up and leaving

mates ended without serious injuries or police action.

the field to the regulars: anti-war Quakers, Pakistani-war

A spokesman said he could give no reason for the walkaways. protesters and a man plugging away for Men's Liberation.

HECKLERS MAR DEBATE
British open Common Market debate

LONDON (f) - Foreign Sec-
retary Sir Alec Douglas-Home
said yesterday membership in
Europe's Common Market may
represent Britain's last chance
to regain prosperity and author-
ity in the world.
But storms of jeers from
h e c k 1 i n g antimarketeers fre-
quently interrupted the aristo-
crats British statesman as he
opened House of Commons de-
bate on the nation's bid to join
the European community.
The rowdy scenes seemed to
throw Douglas-Home off bal-
ance, giving an anticlimatic
sense to the crucial"issues to be
decided by British lawmakers in

the next eight days.
A substantial vote for entry
into the Common Market is ex-
pected when the shouting ends.
Arguing the case for British
entry in a chamber packed with
legislators, diplomats and visi-
tors, Douglas-Home said this
country through most of the
1960s had displayed symptoms
of withdrawal from world af-
fairs and involvements. But now
the time had come to "regain
some of our confidence and en-
ter a partnership in which we
can pull our full weight."
Struggling to make himself
heard above a chorus of inter-
ruptions, he said: "Such a

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chance of economic expansion,
for increased authority, to build
security for the future will not
recur for many a day, if it ever
comes again." .
F o r m e r Defense Minis-
ter Denis Healey, who rose to
argue Labor's case against ac-
cepting Heath's terms, chal-
lenged Douglas-Home's argu-
ment. There is no chance of a
unified Common Market for-
eign policy, he said, while
France follows its own line to-
ward the Americans, Russians
and the Middle East.
Healey warned against any
move to implement Heath's pet
plan for pooling British-French
nuclear weapon resources to
form a European deterrent,
"Any attempt to set up such a
force would split Europe from
America and Canada," he said.
"Any attempt to set up a deter-
rent which did not include Ger-
many would split Britain and
France from Germany and the
rest of Europe. If it included
Germany it would rule out any
hope of improving relations be-
tween East and West."

Gravel and the Canadians pro-
tested the five-megaton u n d e r
ground nuclear explosion planned .
later this month on Amchitka Is-
land in the Aleutians. The Presi-:
dent has not decided whether to
halt the test.
"We are acting essentially as
citizens," said Gravel, a Democrat
carrying a sign that proclaimed:
"Mr. President, where do you
stand on Canmkin?" Cannikin is
the code name for the test.,
At the time the President was
in the East Room receiving cre- George Meany
,dentials of new ambassadors from
Malta,Senegal, Bolivia, Yugoslavia Dallas, as chairman of the Price
land Argentina. While Gravel.Commission.
,pounded the sidewalk, soldiers On wages, AFL-CIO President
from the Army's fife and drum George leany said that labor co-
corps, dressed in Revolutionary operation with the Phase 2 re-
War redcoats, were playing cere- straints would be jeopardized if
monial music for the dignitaries workers don't get eventu'ally re-
departing by the front door. troactive pay for frozen wages and
Gravel said he had sent tele- deferred pay hikes already nego-
grams twice to President Nixon tiated.
asking for a chance to explain his Meany said in a recorded tee
apprenhensions that the test could vision interview that there is a
pehnsn hath tes d kee sense of injustice on the part
damagae the environment- There

STOCKHOLM W) - The Nobel
Prize in Literature was awarded
yesterday to Pablo Neruda, a Com-
munist poet from Chile who says
he tries "to interpret a little of
the soul of all Latin America."
Some of his poetry is anti-
American, and his writings helped
sway public opinion to bring the
first Marxist government to Chile
last year. President Salvador Al-
lende rewarded him by naming
him ambassador to France.
At the embassy in Paris, Ner-
uda, 67, told reporters: "Poets be-
lieve in miracles and this time it
seems the miracle happened." He
had been considered for the prize
for 20 years.
He will come to Stockholm
Dec. 10 to receive the $88,000
prize.
Asked if he .regarded himself
as a politically militant poet, Uer-
uda replied: "Yes I am, as are all
the writers of Latin America.
There must be writers of all ten-
dencies., One cannot ask that ev-
eryone think alike.
"The government and people of
Chile have a great responsibility
and a great struggle to carry for-
ward and naturally everything
that depends upon me is at the
service of this struggle."
The Swedish Academy of Let-
ters said his poetry "brings alive
a continent's destiny and dreams."
The academy secretary, Karl Rag-
nar Gierow, conceded that Neruda
was a "controversial author," but
declared he was a strong a na-
tionalist as a Communist. He
called Neruda "the poet of violat-
ed human dignity."
It was the second time in four
years that the Nobel -Literature
Prize has gone to a radical na-
tionalist Latin-American writer
assigned as ambassador to Paris.
Miguel Angel Asturias of Guate-
mala won the prize in 1967.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mall.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

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is not~
alone

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was no response from the W h i t e?
House, Gravel said.
Gravel introduced the Canadian
MP's Mark W. Rose and Leonel
Beaudoin as his guests, Rose apol-
ogized for trying to influence ano-
ther country's actions.

of workers whose pay hikes were
frozen and their employers allow-
ed to pocket the money.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

me e
7:00 & 9:15 S

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OCT. 23

HELD
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TODAY AT 1-3-5-7-9

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