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October 20, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-20

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Wednesday, October 20, 1971

-rHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wen -aOcoe 0 17 H ICIA AL

.... , v v .. ....

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Day Caendar Dance Program: Demonstration Class
in Bournonville Ballet Technique, Bar-
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20 bour Studio, 8:30-10 pm.
Physics Discussion: D. Williams, "The GN
Fadiev Approach to the Infrared G
Problem," Lounge, Randall Lab, 11 am.; Regents' Meeting: November 19. Coin-
Anatomy Lecture: R.t. Woodburne, munications for consideration- at this
"The Bladder, Ureter, and Urethra," meeting must be in the President's of-
'4804 Med. Sci. II, 1:10 pm. fice by Nov. 4.
LSA Coffee Hour: Guests are the edi-
tors of the Michigan Daily, 2549 LSA
Bldg., 3-4:30 pm.
Architecture Lecture: S. Parasanevo ORGANIZATION
Poulos, "Research in Plastics and New
Technology for Housing," Arch. Aud.,
3:30 pm.NOTICES
Residential Coil. & B'nai B'rith
Hillel: Y. Bauer, Hebrew Univ. In Jeru-i
salem, "Reflections on the Holocaust : ........as :i::::j" f?' v#'v! ! 1;:2;:;:
Genocide Then and Now," 126 Residen. Washtenaw Student Nurses Asso-
Col., 4 pm. ciation, Oct. 20. Room 3330 Medical Sci-
Physics Seminar: B. McKellar, Univ.jence I Bldg. Public invited. Speaker:
of Melbourne, "Purity Mixing in Nuc- Senator Bursley "Abortion Reform Leg-
lei," P&A Colloq. Rm, 4 pm. isyAtion"
Statistics Seminar: A. Davenport, Ls.A.
Dearorn "Aaptve ocaionEstma L.S.A. Student Government Execu-#
Dearbor, dptive ocat Es tive Council. Oct. 20, 7:00 PM, 3M
tion," 2440 Mason Hall, 4 pm.MihgnUo.
Speech Dept. Performance: "TheMihgnUo.
Hour-Glass" and "Noon", Arena Thea-i Operations Research Society of Amer-
tre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 pm. ica,.UUM. Student Section meeting, Oct.
Computing Center: E. Fronczak, "The 21, 4:00 PM Rm. 170 Bus. Ad. Speaker:
IBM 360/67 Computing System and Dr. C. Rollinger, Systems Dynamics
MTS," Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:30 pm. Techniques Applied to Corporate Plan-
University Players: "Caesar and Cleo-! ning Models.

.

Sinclair

CLAIMS DISCRIMINATION
sues state prison on Poi

Economist discusses

7uO -v*4- 4Va1nil

ft
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(Continued from Page 1)
In an unusual move, Federal "Most other judges have reject-
District Judge John Feikens or- ed such suits on the grounds that
dered last week that "plaintiff prisoners do not have constitutional
must be permitted the opportunity rights," he said. "There has been
of proving in court his allegation a long history in this country of
of discrimination because of his treating prisoners as slaves."
political beliefs." The original suit charges that
According to Strickgold. Sin- "as direct and proximate result of
clair's is the first such suit that the malicious and intentional acts
has ever been permitted to come of defendants, plaintiff has suffer-
to trial. ed continuing deprivation of his
Chess tourney slated at Mark's-

civil rights, including financial
loss, humilation, mental and emo-
tional pain and suffering and loss
of enjoyment of life and liberty,
all past, present and future."
Defendants in the case include
Perry Johnson, warden of Jackson
State Prison, individually and in
his official capacity; Gus Harris-
on, director of corrections, -indi-
vidually and in his official ca-
pacity; their employes and af-
filiates.
The state's Assistant Atty. Gen.
William Mullany has submitted a
brief asking that Sinclair's motions
be dismissed.

uprbtlmtu(s
other prisoners without any sub-
stantial reason to support such Continued from Page 1
treatment and that such confine- es wthile the tighter control was
ment is cruel and unusual be- being negotiated.
cause it is so out of proportion to According to Smith, Phase 2 of
the offense charged." the administration's e c o n o m i c
In addition, the court refused policy is aimed at limiting price
to dismiss a claim by Sinclair that increases to about 22 per cent
certain literature has been ar- per year, while trying for an av-
bitrarily forbidden him by prison erage wage increase rate of 5
officials under a regulation pro- and one-quarter per cent.
hibiting literature of a 'revolution-, "Nobody's talking about sta-
ary' nature. Sinclair says that - -
some types of literature have been
allowed to other prisoners, but not Anti-Nixon
to him.
At all times when Sinclair was " r -

fPhase II
blizing the pric level," Smith
said. "Even if Phase- 2 works;~
there'll be a steady upward
cr'eep."
Smith took issue with many
government policies. "On balance,
I think the import surcharge is a
mistake," Smith stated. He ex-
plained that floating the dollar, or
letting all currencies float in re-
lation to each other in the inter-
national monetary system, would
be better than instituting .re-
straints on international trade.
A country may correct its bal-
ance of payments by revaluating
its currencies, allowing unemploy-

.
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"E

(Continued from Page 1)
for women and beginning players.
The awards are being offered as
an incentive to get people to play
who would not ordinarily play in
a national chess tourney.
All players are eligible for the
more than $300 in prize money,
distributed over three major cate-
gories.

has played only one game of chess
in his life

U

The Place to Meet INTERESTING People!
BACH CLUB
PRESENTS
RAYMOND SEALEY

i
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People from all over the United
States have already indicated that
they will play. The state cham-
pions of Inidana and Ohio will be
playing at the "Mark's Open" as
well as a University student who

1
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Bach

Iorroba

Sor

De Narvas
Luys Milan
J. Dowland

A Host
of Others

Ga 4
7:00& 9:15 5

AAA AI AA,- !lmprisoned at Jackson he has
Local businesses are also be- In it he said. "We properly as- epn kept separate from the other
coming involved in promoting the sume that the Court will ta-ke the; prisoners, the suit says.
tournament. Many have contri- customary judicial notice of the He was transferred to Mar-
buted money to the promoters to extensive Michigan statutory law Sa rin at o point
establish sponsorships for people which is here so multifariously as- quette State prison at one point
unable to afford the $12.00 entry sailed by the plaintiff 'Messiah of where he was placed in segrega-
. . tion after prison officials sus-
fee. Marijuana;' one of the apotheistic fte llereson poffica su
The tourney will begin Friday titles idolatrously bestowed upon "strike". Afterwards he was trans-
night and continue through Sun- the Court's 'constitutional' supli- ferred back to Jackson where he
day. For those unable to begin cant here (now nearing 30) by his has since been in some form of
play Friday night, the organizers 'believing' band of 20 year old (and segregation.
have set up a special first round less) disciples of the 'grass' Sigreairnii
match on Saturday morning, culture." Sincleair charges this is punish-
Registration will be held Fri- Fei* . ment for participation in the
eiken, however, decided to ac- planned strike at Marquette, "al-
day evening at 7:30 and Saturday cept the motion, even though he though no hearing or charges
says he believed many of Sinclair's have been made against him in
allegations are without merit. this respect," the suit says.
"There is one over-riding alle- A few months later, Sinclair
gation which cannot be ignored,"
was r'emoved from segregation to
he said, in a written opinion. "That a "new, more onerous confine-
he is being discriminated against , ment for violation of prison regu-
because of his political beliefs." lations concerning typewriters in
According to the opinion, Sin- that he typed materials for other
s Issho yi Geng clair based his complaints on: -inmates."
-"the First Amendment, in Sincleair remains in segregation
that he has been severely re- subject to review every 30 days.
stricted with regard to mail, in- ' ~ ~--~~ ~
coming and outgoing, and in re- One of the world's leading en-
spect to literature in the form of - docrinologists, Dr. Jerome W. Conn
periodicals and books which he lof the University Medical Center,
may receive and that he is being has been named the recipient of
discriminated against because of the 1971 Health Memorial Award.
R DAY OCT. 23 his political beliefs;" Given annually to a scientist,
LY ! -"the Sixth Amendment, in who has made an outstanding con-
that there has been interference tribution in the field of cancer
with his attorney-client privilege; research, the award is presented
Clan Saga one attorney was not allowed to by Anderson Hospital and Tumor
visit him, correspondence was de Institute of the University of Tex-
c of the rise of the samurai, layed, a letter concerning a hear- as at Houston.
ing before the disciplinary hear-
stocracy, against the Buddhist ing was not mailed until after the
classic historical action drama. hearing had been held;" and
-"the Eighth and Fourteenth
1. Aud . COLORamendments, in that he has been
onerous form of confinement than

; I arfmmq qfart I

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'5/ N UIUJ U' U'U.4eV E - UInent to increase so its citizens
(Continued from Page z) can't afford imports, or erecting
Plans also include the serving trade barriers, Smith said,
of an eviction notice to President He criticized Nixon's plan for
Nixon, and evening workshcs on tax cuts and federal expenditure
the Vietnamese'peace proposal, cuts as "a flagrant violation of
sexism, imperialism, and welfare's j economic common sense." In the-
relation to mass education. ory, Smith explained, the two
Organizers expect that the thrust should cancel each other out, with
of the "Evict-Nixon" campaign' will tax cuts stimulating the econimy
come from mobilization of local while the expenditure cuts slowed
communities. It is hoped citizen it down.
watchdog groups - to he called Smith also expressed doubts
"gnd j ' ' about the proposed investment tax
togr nestigate and indict theoalcredit. "I think there's some ques-
legedt crimesofapoliticians,tindus-tion about how effective- it's go-
trialistsandotherestablishmen ing to be when much of our ma-
tris.s achinery is under utilized now," he
leaders.sad
Many of these "grand juries, said.
plan to enter local election pri-
maries to publicize what they term: He VHSCosand
"corruption" and offer a political ys
alternative to "the politics that toh1101(1 seminars
have elevated Richard Nixon."
The fall program ror fail local Two nationally prominent fig-
"grand juries" .will include de- ures in the field of higher edu- .
mands for an immediate with-' cation, Roger Heyns and Joseph
drawal of American troops from Cosand, will lead a series of
Indochina, the liberation of what public. seminars . this fall "at the
they call "political prisoners in University.
America," and a guaranteed an- The series, beginning Oct. 30,
nual income of $6,500 for families offers four consecutive weekly
of four. seminars, each on Saturday. All
Central m a s s demonstrations will be from nine a.m. to noon
will supplement local action. The in Rackham Building.
campaign includes plans for non- Heyns, a professor of educa-
violent mass demonstrations dur- tion and psychology, is a former
ing the Republican National Con- chancellor of the University of
vention in San Diego, Calif. California at Berkeley.

/

CLASSICAL GUITARIST
Acclaimed on B.B.C., Canadian T.V.
REFRESHMENTS;
Chicken Egg-Drop Soup & Almond Cookies
after program
THURSDAY AT 8 P.M.
So. Quad, West Lounge
POSITIVELY NO MUSICAL KNOWLEDGE NEEDED
ABSOLUTELY EVERYONE INVITED
Forther info.: Soe: 764-7894, John: 482-5858

SATUR
ON

The Taira I

The great Kenji Mizoguchi's epi
against the Emperor and the or
hierarchy, with its private army. A
120 mins. Nat. Sc

CRISIS GROWING
Yes pose threat to city

4.
4I
'p
lI

PN(V a stupendous sale
P RIiU to introduce you
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health and beauty aids

REGULAR
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100 mg.
250 mg.
500 mg.

ASCORBIC ACID

100's
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QUARRY BRAND THERAPEUTIC
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QUARRY BRAND VITAMIN E
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VITAMIN A SYNTHETIC
25,000 units 100's $2.98 $1.49
50,000 units 100's $4.98 $2.49
QUARRY BRAND B COMPLEX
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100's $4.79 $2.39
DIOCYTYL SODIUM SULFOSUCCINATE

(Continued from Page 1)
One reason for the negligible
increase, besides lack of space,
may be the reluctance of city of-
ficials to erect any additional me-
ters in the city - because they
say meters do not effectively cre-
ate new spaces through turnover.
Some officials say parking tic-
kets, usually carrying a $2 fine if
paid within a week and $5 after-
wards, and meter-rates of 20 cents
per hour, are not effective deter-
rents, even though the meter-
rate is twice that of Detroit and,
four times that of many metro-
politan suburbs.
But as yet, the city has found
no other way to take the "pres-
sure" off the little space that
there is.
Harris and other city officials
place much of the blame on what
they term "the University's failure
to cooperate." The University
maintains several of its own park-
ing structures, and while they
pick up some of the slack, city of-
ficials say they discriminate in
favor of the University commun-
ity - particularly in favor of the
faculty and full-time staff.
A permit to use a designated
faculty-staff lot is $25 per year-
a figure which compares to over
$300 at the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley. "Faculty and
staff here are encouraged need-
lessly to drive," Harris maintains,
"because the University has made:
these highly subsidized lots so at-
tractive."
"Meanwhile." he adds, "stu-
dents and residents are driving all
over the city looking for some-
where to park."i
Part-time University employes,
who often live outside the city
limits, are also affected, since
they too 'are excluded from using
the faculty - staff parking lots.
However, they are eligible with
students to use certain of the Uni-
versity's parking structures.
Unfortunately, these structures
are few and far between, often
meaning a long walk home.
For the most part, students are'
Betsy Barbour House
invites
ALL GRAD STUDENTS
to on
' OPEN HOUSE
Thurs., Oct. 21, 1971
9- l p~m.
BEER-Donation 50c s

fated with other citizens to suf-
fer six days a week through
"switch parking."
This much-criticized form of
automotive hopscotch prevalent in
residential sections of the city,
forces residents to park their cars
on opposite sides of the street
every other day from 2-5 a.m.
Attempts to repeal the switch-
parking ordinance - instituted to
permit street cleaners to proceed
unimpeded down the street-have
for two years been futile.
While most city officials acknowl-
edge that the key to solving both
the parking and traffic problems
is to lessen the number of cars on
the streets, certain obstacles make
such a. solution seem impractical
at the moment.
First, the city is virtually lack-
ing in any kind of public trans-
port and rapid transit through the
city.
The mainline-or city-bus sys-
tem runs infrequently-and is limit-
ed in the area it serves. As a mode
of public transportation it has not
been successful, Harris says, and
is mainly used on a charter basis,
and to transport children to school.
"Mainline busing does not pre-
vent families from buying cars,"
Harris says. He adds it is low-in-
come persons who make most use
of the buses, and they own the
least cars anyway.
"The problem is how to make
mainline busing more attractive
and therefore m o r e effeztive,"
Harris explains.
But lack of rapid transit is not
the only cause of traffic longes-
tion in the city. In addition, there
is a lack of adequate bikeways to
permit cyclers to travel safely and
reasonably quickly through the
city.
"Bicycles as a form ofArans-
portation are still considered to
be in the rinky-dink stage," Harris
says. Until they are taken serious-
ly, he maintains, not much pro-
gress will be forthcoming.
The largely unchecked, rapidly
growing number of cars is also
creating numerous problems in
traffic control. In fact, John Rob-
bins, director of" traffic engineer-
ing and transportation, says the
situation is getting so bad that the
city has begun to explore the pos-
sibilities of instituting a computer-
ized, master' traffic control sys-
tems network. Under the system,
all traffic signals in the city would
be timed and regulated by com-
puter.
Furthermore, excess traffic cre-
ates air and noise pollution, and
a very real dangei' to pedestrians,
say city officials.

"We are rapidly getting more
and more places in the city where
a pedestrian is literally unable to
cross the street," Harris laments.
He explains the problem lies
with cars turning left into cross-
walk paths under four way signals.
This means pedestrians; are :vir-
tually unable to cross -the street,
whether the light is green or red.
The "answer" which the city has
come up with is an eight way sig-
nal at crossroads, which Drovides
a definite period when pedestrians
can cross unimpeded.
However, the eight-way - signal
drastically slows down the flow of
traffic through the intersection.
Traffic through certain -areas of
the city has been rerouted off main
thoroughfares and onto residential
side streets, in order to =take 'the
pressure off the large intersec-
tions.
In other cases, traffic has been
rerouted to permit construction 'of
road widenings and extensions
which will purportedly improve
traffic routes for the future.
The increased traffic has anger-
ed many of the residents of such
areas, who are concerned -about
the noise, the inconvenience of get-
ting around their own neighbor-
hoods (because detour streets are
often made one-way), but most of
all because they fear for the safety
of their children during play.
It seems clear to many city of-
ficials that Ann Arbor is suffering
the effects of poor city planning
from long ago. General road im-
provements of one sort or another
are vitally needed in many areas,
says Harris. Roads must be built,
such as the Huron Parkway, For-
est - Observatory, and Eisenhower
Parkway extensions.
Another area - Hill ' St. between
Forest and State, takes on special
importance from an ecological
viewpoint.
An extremely narrow street for
being one of only three main East-
West arteries in the city, Hill will
have to be widened within ten
years, officials say, in order to
accommodate the increase of cars.
But if this project s completed,
it will mean that 50 trees, lining
both sides of the street, will have
to be cut down. Harris deplores
such a measure, but like most
other city officals, maintalns that
Hill St. will be widened in any
case. Hopefully, he says, a plan
will be devised to spare at least
some or all of the trees.
Whether the plan will be found,
however, depends-like all the rest
of the parking and transportation
problems-on whether the city can
successfully do battle with the
strength of a severely limited
budget.
TOMORROW
TRANSPORTATION SOLUTIONS
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RUBBING ALCOHOL
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Standard 10 Vitamin Formula. Represent-
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sale prices from October 15th to October 31st, 1971
nthe

dRum

DIAL 8-6416
TODAY AT
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

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