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October 17, 1971 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-17

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 17, 1971

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Oriole rally
BALTIMORE () - The Balti- Frank Robinson drew a walk off a wid
more Orioles, bouncing back from reliever Bob Miller with one out the :
the brink of eliminating defeat- in the 1th- made
ed the Pittsburgh Pirates 3-2 yes- Merv Rettenmund then bounced ed an
terday on Brooks R~binson's sac- a single up the middle, F r a n k Mi
rifice fly In the 10th ining and Robinson racing around to third with
sent the 1971 world series into a on the play, bat ri
decisive seventh game. Brooks Robinson, who had col- loftin
Robinson, a hero of s er i es ilected seven previous hits in this when
past, ended thie tension-filled Series, then stepped to the plate and7
game with a soft fly to center as a crowd of' 44,174 yelled with home
field that brought a sliding Frank anticipation for the likeable third Th
Robinson across the plate with baseman who so often has pro- line f
the tie-breaking run. vided the game-winner for t h e Sang
The end to the dramatic game, slid i
in. which the Orioles trailed 2-0 Brooks fouled the first pitch to ler fl
before battling back, came after him back of the plate, then tookIOriol(

1,:.

ties

de pitch for a ball. He missed
next pitch for a strike that
the count 1-2 and then foul-
nother back.'
iler's right arm came around
the fifth pitch and Brooks'
eached out to meet it, -the ball
ng softly to center fi eld
e Vic Davalillo made the grab
then reared back and fired
e.
e ball, however, was up the
or Pittsburgh catcher Manny
;illen and Frank Robinson
in as plate umpire Bill Kib-
ashed the safe sign and the
es-oriented crowd w e nat wild.

t..

Like all of us,

hs Changabit.Theresult:

up
The victory -squared the series
at three games apiece - e a c h
team having won all its games
at home - and left Sunday's sev-
enth game as the decider.
Through six innings it looked
as if the Pirates had it - t h e
game, the Series and a special
gtche in World Series history.
After battling back from an 0-2
deficit to take three games at
Pittsburgh, they-were on the verge
of becoming the first team in base-
ball history to annex the w o r 1 d
championship with four straight
comeback victories.
Despite a run-producing single
by Bob Robertson in the second
inning and Roberto Clemente's
homer in the third it wasn't
enough for the Pirates, as t h e
slumbering Baltimore bats began
to shake off the effect of a three-
game slump.
Scoreless for 22 straight innings
and limited to two hits through
five Innings by Pittsburgh starter
Bob Moose, the Oriles struck for
their first run in the sixth inning
on Don Buford's homer and then
tied it in the seventh.
With one out in the seventh,
Mark Belanger singled to get the
Orioles started against reliever
Bob Johnson.
Baltimore starter Jim Palmer
then wascalled out on strikes but
Belanger moved into scoring posi-
tion bystealing second.
When Johnson went 'to 3-1 on
Buford, Pittsburgh Manager Dan-
ny Murt'augh called for his bull-
pen ace, Dave Giusti. Giusti f in-
ished the. walk to Buford, t h e n
found himself the victim of a
looping singleby Dave Johnson
that tied it.
Now the tension began to build,
the Pirates needing a run for their
first championship since 1960 and
Special
Paper Back
BOOK SALE.
olletts MEZZANINE
Paper Back Book Dept.
THIS WEEK ONLY
Selected items from
McGraw Hill
John Wiley
Capicorn
Prentice Hall Spectrum
Paper Backs only
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WHILE THEY LAST
FOLLETT'S

)eries
the Orioles needing a run to re-
main alive in their bid for a se-
cond stright world championship.
The Orioles made the f i r s t
serious bid in the bottom of the
ninth when, with one out, Bela-
nger walked on a 3-2 pitch. One
out- later, Don Buford doubled in-
to the right field corner, but Bal-
timore third base coach Billy Hun-
ter held Buford up at third in
respect for Clemente's rifle arm.
Clemente fired a one-bounce
strike to the plate and would have
had Belanger easily had he tried
to score.
Johnson then grounded to Pitts-
burgh shortstop Jackie Hernandez,
who bobbled the ball but recoup-
ed just in time to get the streak-
ing Johnson at first base by a
step.
The world champion Orioles
will go with Mike Cuellar, t h e
third game loser, against Steve
Blass, the winner of the t h i r d
game for the Pirates, in tomor-
row's contest.

-Associated Press
BALTIMORE ORIOLES slugger Frank Robinson slides safely across home plate, scoring the winning
run for the Birds in the bottom of the tenth inning of yesterday's World Series contest. The throw
from center fielder Vic Davalillo was short to catcher Manny Sanguillen, allowing the Birds to
even the series. The seventh game will be played this afternoon.

ARKANSAS DOWNS TEXAS
Undefeated Sooners halt Colorado

s

Teir new album on Capitol

By The Associated Press
NORMAN, Okla. - Lightning
Greg Pruitt flashed by Colorado
on touchdown scampers of 66 and
12 yards and quarterback Jack
Mildren hurled two long scoring
bombs as 'second-ranked Oklaho-
ma's thunderbolt Wishbone-T of-
fense blitzed Colorado 45-17 in a
collision of two Big Eight grid
powers yesterday.
Pruitt, a converted split end who
has emerged as one of college foot-
ball's premier running backs,
rushed for more than 150 yards
as the Sooners ran up a 24-0 half-
time lead.
Mildren, who had kept Oklaho-
ma's passing attack a secret un-
til this game, hit John Harrison on
a 54-yard scoring play in the first
half, then .combined with halfback
Joe Wylie on a 68 - yard touch-
down in the second half which
broke the Buffalo's back.
Colorado made a contest out of
it briefly in the third quarter as
sophomore quarterback Ken John-
son hurled a 64-yard touchdown
pass to Willie Nichols and tailback
Charlie Davis hit paydirt on a
16-yard run.
However, the Buff defense could-
n't halt OU's rampaging attack
which rolled up more than 600
yards in total offense.
It was the second straight week
that Oklahoma had knocked over
one of the nation's top-ranked
teams, and the victory set the
For the student body:
Genuine
Authentic
' Navy
PEA COATS

with No. 1-ranked Nebraska on
Thanksgiving Day for the Big
Eight title and possibly the na-
tional championship. The Sooners
crushed Texas 48-27 last week.
* * *
Razorbacks romp
LITTLE ROCK - Quarterback
Joe Ferguson, a deadly marksman
with nerves of rawhide, led Ar-
kansas with two touchdowns in less
than three minutes at the close of
the first half yesterday to dump
10th-ranked Texas 31-7 and snap
the Longhorns' 21-game Southwest
Conference victory string.
Ferguson, a 6-foot-2, 15-pound
junior from Shreveport, La., pass-
ed for two touchdowns aid ran for
another as Arkansas built up a
21-7 halftime lead before heavy
rains cut down on the offense in
the second half.
Ferguson whipped Arkansas -
now 3-0 and the undisputed leader
in the Southwest Conference - on
a 94-yard drive which he climaxed
with a 10-yard gallop behind a
crushing block by Mike Saint to
give Arkansas a 14-7 lead it never
relinquished.
Defending SWC champion Texas
had to punt after three downs. It
took the determined Razorbacks,
who had not beaten Texas since
1966, only 37 seconds to go 56
yards. The payoff came on a 37-
yard touchdown bullet from Fergu-
son to wide receiver Mike Rep-
pond, who didn't have a Texas
player within 15 yards of him.
Huskers rampage
LINCOLN - Nebraska's top-
ranked and undefeated football
juggernauts, aided by a stonewall
defense, rolled over Kansas 55-0
yesterday in a Big Eight clash be-
fore 68,331, the largest crowd in
Memorial Stadium history.
So grudging was Nebraska's
"blackshirts" defensive unit that
the Jayhawks owned minus total
offense yardage at the intermission
and did not gain a first down un-

each period, the most spectacular
coming on a 66-yard third quarter
run from scrimmage by Jeff Kin-
ney.
The victory ran Nebraska's
string to 25 games without a loss
and dropped Kansas to 3-3 for the
year.
*, * *
Tide rolls
BIRMINGHAM - Alabama's
proud defense, led by Robin Park-
house and a ballhawking secon-
dary, held Tennessee off yesterday
for a 32-15 Southeastern Confer-
ence football victory.
It was fourth-ranked Alabama's
sixth straight conquest of the sea-
son and the first over Tennesseg
since 1966. The defeat left Tennes-
see with a 3-2 mark with Auburn
holding the other decision over the
Vols.
Both teams began raggedly and
there were four turnovers in the

stage for a mammoth showdown' while, tallied two touchdowns in

a

first eight minutes, including a
fumble recovery by Parkhouse on
the Vol 22 that launched Alabama
on its first score. Three plays lat-
er Terry Davis passed 20 yards to
David Bailey for the touchdown.
Irish rip
SOUTH BEND - A smothering
Notre Dame defense more than
made up for a sputtering offense
as the seventh-ranked Irish gain-
ed their second consecutive shutout
with a 16-0 victory over North Car-
olina yesterday.
A sellout crowd of 59,075 basked
under blue skies in mid-70 degree
temperatures as the huge Irish
defenders limited the Tar Heels to
92 yards rushing and 57 passing.
Bob Thomas, a sophomore place-
kicker, gave Notre Dame 311 the
offense it needed as he tied the
snigle game Irish school eccrd
for field goals with boots of 27, 28
and 24 yards in the first half.

4i-

Brown, harriers gain
fourth place finish,

By SANDI GENIS
Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING - In what is
beginning to become a habit,
freshman standout Keith Brown
paced a determined effort by the
Wolverine harriers with an out-
standing individual performance
yesterday morning at The Michi-
gan State Invitation Cross Coun-
try meet.
Posting the finest time of his
collegiate career over a six-mile
course, Brown emerged from the
fog that engulfed Forst Akers Golf
Course to cross the finish line
fourth among 45 competitors from
Western, Eastern, Central and
Michigan State Universities, as
well as from Michigan, with a
time of 30:58.
The fine freshman, who de-
clared that the weather did not
bother him at all since he felt he
ran better under inclement condi-
tions, passed the two-mile mark
in about twentieth place and had{
pulled up to the seventh spot after
four miles.
Turning on the speed, within
the last mile and a half he man-
aged to slip past two Eastern
Michigan stars, Jim Bilsborrow
and Terry Furst, and nearly
caught the two MSU runners, Ken
Popejoy and Rob Cool, who fin-

State Street at North Univ.

_____ I

$25

til the third quarter.
The Cornhusker offense,

mean-

I

:,
y-- : . __ _ _ . . . _ ... ._ ______ _ ____ _ __ _ _ _ _ __

ished just ahead of him, to cop
the fourth slot.
Coach Dixon Farmer was more
than satisfied with Brown's per-
formance. "Keith is one of the
best freshmen in the Midwest,"
Farmer declared, citing his first
place finish among the freshmen
in last weekends Notre Dame In-
vitational. "If he keeps improv-
ing he could become the first Wol-
verine NCAA cross country All-
America in many years."
While Brown was spectacular,
the team as a whole managed to
duplicate his fourth place finish
for a somewhat less than out-
standing showing. Nevertheless,
Farmer was pretty much satisfied
with their morning's work, espe-
cially with the performance of his
two sophomore stalwarts Mike
Pierce and Rich Schott.
Pierce finished second among
the Michigan harriers, in eigh-
teenth place in the meet, with a
time of 32:17, a "milestone" for
him in Farmer's estimation.
Schott was the third Wolverine to
finish, posting a 32:22 run for
the twentieth spot.
Displaying surprising power, a
tough Spartan team nipped the
favored Western Michigan squad,
36-46. The Spartans placed six
men in the top twenty, led by Ken
Popejoy and Rob Cool who fin-
ished second and third, respec-
tively, with a seven-eight finish
by Dave Deiters and Randy Kil-
patrick.
Sparking the WMU team, Gary
Harris copped the individual hon-
ors, establishing a new course re-
cord of 30:26.3 while easily outdis-
tancing his competition.
The Wolverines were barely
nosed out of the third place slot
by the Eastern Michigan team
which garnered 76 points to the
Wolverines 88. Central Michigan
finished last with 102 points.

TAKE A
TASTE OF
IS (AEL...

Tues., Oct. 26 at Power Center
7:30- ISRAEL NOW
Israeli representatives will be present to provide information on
programs in, ISRAEL: Hebrew- Study, Kibbutz, University, Jobs,
Travel, Archeology, and. more.
ADMISSION FREE TO "ISRAEL NOW" WORKSHOPS
8:30 - SHALQM '72
MC'd by Mike-Burstein - Israeli motion picture and stage star.
FEATURING:.
Yaffa Yarkoni: popular singer called the "national voice. of
Israel."
Shuli Nation: whose dramatic assent began when she introduced
"Jerusalem of Gold" in 1967.
PLUS: "The Armenian" - Yeminite folk singers.
"The Lions of Judah" - a contemporary rock group from Tel
Aviv, with the SHALOM '72 Dance Ensemble.
BE GLAD
YOU' RE
YOUNG.
G-ET TH.E -NEW
STUDEN.T FARE

A
.1
4w

I

I

The most
Meaningful Semester
you'll ever spend...
could be the one on
World Campus Afloat
Sailing Feb. 1972 to Africa and the Orient
Through a transfer format, more than 5,000
students from 450 campuses have participated
for a semester in this unique program in inter-
national education.
WCA will broaden your horizons, literally and
figuratively . . . and give you a better chance to
make it-meaningfully-in this changing world.

A U~ ~U. UW ~ I

' I

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