100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 14, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 14, 1971

/

records-
Elton John, Ernie Tubb fans, take note

'Sister George' to open

By AL SHACKELFORD
A new label called Vertigo has
jumped into the psychedelic rock
market with two new releases,
Catapilta (Vertigo 1006), and
Jade Warrior (1007). The first
spotlights a host of shrill, ugly-
sounding instruments: fuzz-tone
guitar, various horns, and the un-
pleasant warbling voice of one
Anna Meek. Side two is devoted
to a rambling 24:15 of "Embroy-
onic Fusion," as simple codas
are repeated over and over and'
each individual Catapilla takes
a few fast, mindless' solos.
Jade Warrior is three mus-
tachioed guys who sound a little
like Pink Floyd (but not enough),
or maybe like the Amboy Dukes
might if they'd dropped too much
acid. Lush, flute-spiced tunes are
alternated with harsh fuzzy rock-
ers; "Masai Morning" and "Psy-
chedelic Sergeant" will etch
themselves into your memory,
Occasionally one of the Warriors
will coo a soft, poetic vocal.
The Second Coming (Decca
DL 75304) of "help" makes me
thank my lucky stars I missed
their first coming. These three
lads play loud punk-rock in a
style reminiscent of Frost or
some other bad Michigan band.
Every cut is marred by a super-

psychedelic guitar and shrilly-
harmonized vocals. But no one
can accuse Second Coming of not
being right on; one cut is en-
titled "Dear Lord" (the boys
ask God to heal their sick gui-
tars) and another,""Power," is
all about giving power to the
people, and has a drum solo.
This Is Jerry Wallace (Decca
DL 75294) has clean-cut Jerry
singing in a country bag. The
songs are mostly inept imitations
of Kris Kristofferson, if that is
possible. The liner notes call
Jerry a "superstar," Put don't
believe it. This album is strictly
for Jim Nabors fans. Don't let
it stick to your fingers.
Ronnie Barron, his voice drip-
ping with funk, does bad Leon
Russell imitations on Reverend
Ether (Decca DL 75303). Appar-
ently just off the bayou, Ronnie
sings songs of his trouble-filled
southern upbringing, like "Ol'
Chattanooga," and the band
sludges along behind. "Ol' Chat-
tanooga" is interesting - it has
the worst guitar solo I've ever
heard. Check it out.
Together (Warner Brothers
PRO 486) is one of those mixed-
bag promo collections this com-
pany ps famous for. Cuts arous-
ing my interest were: "A Hun-

dred Mountains," sung by Jackie
Lomax; something by a ten-
piece rhythm and blues band
called Earth, Wind and Fire; the
danceable "Dirty, Dirty" by
Crazy Horse; and an ok rocker
by that great bunch of fellas
Alice Cooper. The standout song
in this collection is "Temptation
Took Control of Me and I Fell,"
from the Mother Earth-Tracy
Nelson album Bring Me Home
(Reprise 6431). Anyone w h o
wants to hear Tracy at her best
should pick up her album Coun-
try (Mercury SR 61230).
Ernest Tubb, an important
figure in country music since
around 1940, has a new album
titled One Sweet Hello. This is
old-fashioned country, with,
weeping steel guitar and Tubb's
sandy vocals. The songs here will
be familiar to anyone who lis-
tens to country music:. M e 1
Tillis' "Commercial Affection,"
Kristofferson's "Help Me Make
It Through the Night," Dallas
Frazier's "Touching Home," and
"Sometimes You Just Can't
Win," a hit for George Jones.
If' you are a long-time T u b b
fan, this album is a winner; if
not, let it pass by.
11-17-70 (UNTb93105) byrEl-
ton John has been out for a
while, first in bootleg form and
then with this official version.
John sings and plays some of
his most-requested numbers here
with faultless backing f r o m
bassist Dee Murray and drum-
mer Nigel Olson. An acappella
intro to "Honky Tonk Women"
leads into a band-up rendition
of that much-done tune, the
highlight of side one. John
seems at his best when doing
other people's material, p r o-
bably because he doesn't have to
mess around with Bernie Tau-
pin's dumb lyrics.
This album gets off when John
and company break off from
the stultified "Burn Down the
Mission" and romp into a cou-
ple minutes of rave-up instru-
mentalization, featuring t h e
mercurial fingers of John and
especially Murray. This unfolds
into a little upbeat John piano
solo, and then into Arthur Crud-
up's "My Baby Left Me." Every-
thing builds until Elton tries to
get funky with Lennon-McCarc-
ney's "Get Back". All in all,
John fans should be powerfully'
afected by this rocking 1 i t t 1 e
number.
Metromedia offers, another in
a seemingly endless stream of
solo balladeers. Peter A 11 e n
(Metromedia KMD 1042) doesn't
have much to say, to the tasteful
accompaniment of piano, bass
and guitars. This album is so

tasteful, I want to hear some-
body blow a lick. The only-song
that made my eyelids flicker
was "Glittering Zero,' a racy
condemnation of ripe, j u i c y
girls with nothing upstairs.'
From the same company
comes Spirit in Flesh (Metro-
media MD 1041), a bunch of
guys and gals just bursting.
with religion. What might have
been a decent effort in the hard-
rock genre is soiled by the
preachy, histronic vocals of
Michael Metelica. Pod Leslie's
lead guitar will clear your sinus-
es, if your ears can stand it.
A definite improvement is an
obscure number by Alex Bevan
called No Truth to Sell (B i g
Tree BTS 2006), With lots of
nice acoustic guitar, including
the instrumental "Sunburn." Be-
van, who sounds like Anne Mur-
ray at times, writes pleasant
songs, some of which include
the finest; images this side of
Boz Scaggs. "Ease YoursLoad"
is a particular favorite of mine,
a simple spiritual convincingly
done by Bevan. Give it a listen
if you can find it anywhere.
Another pretty good album is
Future Tense by The Quintet,
five guys who used to back up
Sir Douglas Sahm. This is good
bouncy rock, almost top-40
style, with an occasional Latin
flavor. The vocal work is strong
throughout. "Stager Lee" and
"World of Livin' " are about
the only casualties, the s e c o n d
See ECHOES, Page 8
The Place to Meet
INTERESTING people!
presents
WORKS OF
BACH & TELEMAN
played by
FLUTES & PIANO
Cindi Reed's Italiano Chili
served after the Program
THURSDAY AT 8 P.M.
So. Quad, W. Lounge
No musical knowledge needed
EVERYONE INVITED
Further info, Sue, 764-7894
John, 482-5858

By GREG JARBOE
This weekend a new loc al
theater company opens its sea-
son with The Killing of Sister
George. Directed by Terry La-
mude, the Actor's Guild will pre-
sent six performances of this
controversial play by F r a n k
Marcus, which was acclaimed
the best production in London
for 1966. One of the first plays
to deal with lesbian relation-
ships with understanding rath-
er than sensationalism, it was a
major factor in the elimination
of censorship of the arts in
Britain.
The corhpany is sponsored by
the University Activities Center
and is made up of four very
talented actresses. Harriet Win-
kelman plays George; Cynthia
Katz, Childie; Barbara P e a-
'cock, Mrs. Mercie Croft; and
Joan Susswein, Mine., Xeni.
Terry Lamude, who may be
remembered for his performance
of Col. Pickering last year in
My Fair Lady, will also be di-
recting the Guild's production
of the musical, Sid Shrycock
Goes to Africa, play and lyrics
by Marilyn Miller and music by

Dale Genyea, which is scheduled
for a four week run in Chicago
after opening in Ann Arbor in
November.
Sister George will be perform-
ed in the Residential College
Auditorium Friday and Satur-
day at 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. and
Sunday at 2:00 and 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are available at t h e
door for $1.25. This promises to
be one of the more exciting fea-
tures of Ann Arbor's busy dra-
matic scene and should be well
worth seeing.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.
Program Info 665-6290
BEAUTIFUL.
-Pauline Kael, The New Yorker
BRI LLIANT.
-New York Times
SUPERB.
-Playboy Magazine
WARREN JULIE
BEATTY CHRISTIE
PANAVISIONa TECHNICOLOR 0

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT ONLY-THURS., OCT. 14
THE SILENCE
dir. Ingmar Bergman, 1963. With Ingrid Thulin.
United since childhood in lesbian incest, two sisters
struggle and part as the younger seeks her freedom
in a heterosexual-affair.
SWEDISH ACADEMY AWARD-
Best Film of the Year, 1963
SHOWS AT 7 AND 9:30 $1.00
330 Maynard
across from Nickels Arcade
COMING MON.-Jean Cocteau's "The Blood of a Poet"
sponsored by ann arbor film coope.rative

I

INEM

II

at

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
a double feature
7-
The Hound of the Baskervilles
Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes

4

... images

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
PHILADELPHIA
STORY
DIR. GEORGE CUKOR, 1940
With Katherine Hepburn,
James Stewart, Cary
Grant and Ruth Roman.
To quote from our schedule: "Hi
Jinx in Hi Society. Katherine
Hepburn charms the pants off
all comers and the four frolic
in and out of marriage with ef-
fortless elan. The wittiest and
most charming movie you'll ever
see
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

q

at 9-
GUNA DIN
(1939 )
with Cary Grant, Sam Joffe
and Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
75c FOR BOTH FILMS
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
next week: THE GRAPES OF WRATH

.'

I

r-

THE FOLKLORE SOCIETY presents

I

I

if

IN CONCERT

Crisler Arena Sat., October 23

8:30 P.M.

7:00 and 9:05

75c

letters
'Grass Harp' misjudged

To The Daily:
The review of The Grass Harp
was the worst I've ever read.
That girl must have seen a dif-
ferent performance, certainly
not the opening. The play w a s
terrible, granted! But she's all
wet as to why!
She said Carol Brice carried
the show . . . Carol Brice over-
actedj the entire play, spoke
much louder than anyone else,
obnoxiously so, and her constant
screaming helped ruin the play.
By. far and away the only
quality actor, was the actress in
the starring role Barbara Cook.
Her emotions were perfect all
the time. Her voice is beautiful
and she singlehandedly carried
what there was to the play.
Wesley Addy sang very well,
Max Showalter was terrible! Ce-
leste Holm certainly doesn't be-
long in that play, neither does
Duke Henderson, they're both
impossible to understand. Ches-
ter Smith was very good as the

sheriff and Russ Thacker and
Christine Stabile were o n 1 y
second-rate but better than any-
one else except the outstanding
Barbara Cook.
If you send Anita Crone along
to review any more plays, at
least send someone with h e r
that doesn't mistake a 1o u d
voice for quality acting!
-Jeff Scanlan '72

Saturday Night
An erotic mystery, c
phantasmagorical film by
Nagisa Oshima, "J apan's
esthetically and political-
ly most radical film
maker."
Diary of a
Shinjuku Burglar
in the JAPEN festival
ARM/Michigan Film Society
at Natural Science Aud.
7:30 & 9:15

I

Sigma Delta Thu
is sponsoring a
SPAGHETTI DINNER
Sunday, Oct. 17
5-7 p.m.
1405 Hill St.
($1.25 per person)

all seats reserved
ALL TICKETS $2.00 (discount to Folklore Society members)
BUY YOUR TICKETS EARLY AND YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED!
TICKET SALES BEGIN 10 A.M., Monday, October 18 at
THE FOLKLORE CENTER (516 E. William) and the MICHIGAN UNION

Watch for DOC WA TSON-December 4th

_ .}}t }}}:":-}:":r i:i fr S:iF }f{'::.Y'::;: ;: F;: '}y-.x.:G + ,? ,? Y:' "' S: ?;{>. }'h:'y<:,{ ''v; i" "may ?y v} c; y% .
-No NE j4
+:.hn},.;"i}:
.::..:.:.....::4.:. i....,..... .:.:} .:t:. v.. ..:i":t :.: ...:: }}:":::ti:%:jvi: .,.:::. .}:t{{;i:: { W :: {C :} n"K?{5.::.8:."".v k .

I

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY presents
poco
and
DOUG KERSHAW
'FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 1971, 8:30 p.m.
Bowen Field House
and
JOHN DENVER
AND FAT CITY
SATURDAY, OCT. 16, 1971, 8:30 p.m.
Bowen Field House

THE AL
330 MAYNARD
This FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
2 Shows Fri.-Sat.-7:30-10:00
1 Show Sunday-8:30
$2.50 ALL SHOWS
ADVANCE TICKETS-SALVATION RECORDS
(330 Maynard-1103 S. Univ.)
COMING OCT. 22-23-24: JIMMY REED
and the Chicago All Star Blues Band

OCTI
20% r
OFF REG[
OUR ENTIRE ST(
PANTS, SHIRTS, BELT
Greatly Reduced Prices .
to Update Your Wardro
day Gift Items Now ..

OLER
TO 50%
UMAR PRICES
OCK of JEANS, FASHION
CS, SWEATERS, Now at
.. A Wonderful Opportunity
be . .. Or to Select Your Holi- .,
DAY, THURSDAY
NIGHT 'TIL 9 P.M.

TICKETS:
$1.50, $2.50, $3.50
for each show

AVAILABLE AT:
E.M.U. UNION
MICHIGAN UNION
ALL J.L, HUDSON STORES

tonite only-
MARC

CHOVER
blues, ragtime
steel guitar

tihe onn arbor film cooperative presents
WILD ST AW E RES
Director Ingmar Bergman examines the effects of life without love with personally - created
optical effects evoking the protagonist's past in some of the most exquisite images ever conceived
in film. Photography by Gunnar Fischer.

OPEN MONi
AND FRIDAY

m __E

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan