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October 12, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-12

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Page Eight-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 12, 1971

P a e E i H E M C I G A A L u s a , O t b r 1 , 1 7

Anti-war moratorium
planned across nation

CITY COUNCIL:
Redistricting, voter
registration debated

(Continued from Page 1)
which are planning anti-war pro-
grams.
In East Lansing, workshops and
speeches will focus on the war,
and a rally has been called for
tomorrow afternoon.
Numerous events are planned
for the New York City area in-
cluding speeches by Mayor John
Lindsay, Bess Myerson Grant, Poet
Pete Seeger and various 1 a b o r
leaders at rallies and demonstra-
tions in all parts of the city.
Many Chicago area communities
are holding small demonstrations
and vigils, and the University of
C h i c a g o is having a day - long
teach-in on the war.
In the Boston area, suburbs and
towns have called picnics, rallies,
and panel discussions on the war.
B o s t o n University, Holy Cross.
Boston College, and Tufts have
planned anti-war activities and a
march has been called for down-

town Boston tomorrow aftern
However, nothing has beer
ganized at Harvard Universit3
Rallies have also been plan
for Pittsburgh, Philadelphia,
waukee, Los Angeles, and
Francisco but none of thosed
onstrations seem to have
makings of a massive shove
opposition to the war.
However, the moratoriun
reaching many communities
have never independently pa:
pated in nationally coordir
anti - war programs. Worksl
speeches, candlelight procesk
and guerrilla theater have1
planned in such diverse locale
Davidson College in North C
lina; Davenport, Iowa; Roc
land and Moline, Illinois; A
querque, New Mexico; the Uni
sity of Oklahoma; and score
suburbs and residential comn
ties which are planning sepa
actions against the war.

(Continued from Page 1) 1

Mil- action," James Stephenson
San Fourth Ward) said.

(R-

The Republicans plan to intro-
duce a resolution next week which
would replace one of the Demo-
cratic commission members with
a Republican.
Harris claimed yesterday that
the move would be illegal as Coun-
cil can not remove someone whomI
they didn't appoint. Harris made
the appointments to the boundary
commission, and Council approved
them.
The debate over door-to-door
registration was also divided along
party lines, with Democrats gen-
erally favoring such registration
and Republicans expressing oppo-
sition.
Harris outlined three reasons
why Ann Arbor should institute
door-to-door registration: the 18-
year-old vote, the state Supreme
Court ruling which said students
could vote in their college towns,
and the fact that many Michigan
cities have door-to-door registra-
tion while Ann Arbor sloes not.
In response to demands for more
convenient registration for stu-
dents, City Clerk Harold Saunders
will be conducting a two-week on-
campus voter registration drive
beginning next Monday. Registra-
tion will take place at the Mich-
igan Union, Fishbowl, North Cam-
pus Commons and other sites.
Tables will also be set up on

scheduled days at dormitories. If
the door-to-door registration were
approved, dormitory -ules would
prevent registrars from going door-
to-door in those buildings.
In addition, Saunders will be.
holding extra classes for deputy
registrars tomorrow from 2-4 p.m.
and 7:30-9:30 p.m. and Friday from
7:30-9:30 p.m. in City Council
chambers, City Hall.
Budget euts
loom large
(Continued from Page 1)
gents at their meeting Thurs-
day.
Milliken last year ordered cut-
backs totaling 1.5 per cent of the
total appropriations. At the Uni-
versity these cuts were accom-
plished through across-the-board
cutbacks in each department.
In addition, University officials
last fall ordered all units to sub-
mit a plan for "saving" three
per cent of their salary budgets
to compensate for the anticipalld
stringent state allocation this
year.
The "savings," incorporated
into the fiscal 1971-72 budget,
allowed the University to reallo-
cate about $2.8 million into staff
salary increase programs.

Maddox talks
Sunday at'U'
(Continued from Page 1)
the most serious problem confront-
ing the United States today.
Maddox said that neither black
nor white children, parents, or
communities are benefitting fromI
what he termed the chaos and dis-
order engulfing the public edu-
cation system. "All are victims,"
he maintained.
A wideranging question and ans-
wer p e r i o d followed Maddox's
speech.
Commenting on the recent pris-
on riots at Attica Correctional
Facility, Maddox said the prison
situation "will never be perfect"
and added that he felt the prison-
ers' revolt as another aspect of'
"the war on law enforcement that
is going on in this country today."
Maddox, who during his term as
governor initiated dramatic penal
reforms in Georgia, supported New
York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller's
decision to call in state troopers
to, quell the prison rebellion.

(Continued from Page 1)
center their menus around fresh
fruits, breads and grains, vege-
tables and soups.
Indian Summer, located at 315
S. State St. will open this week.
According to owner Mark Hesse,
all meals should cost between
$1 and $2 and "will be prepared
without taking shortcuts."
The second area health food
restaurant - Soybean Cellars,
Inc.-is still in the construction
stage and will not open for about
six weeks.
Situated in the old Veterans
of Foreign Wars Hall on E. Lib-
erty, Soybean Cellars will include
a natural goods/food store -
which will open within the next
two weeks-in addition to the
restaurant.
For those preferring to cook
their own meals, the Ann Arbor
area currently sports five natu-
ral food stores.
Most of the stores offer a
variety of grains, flours, wafers,

NEW RESTAURANTS
Organic food demand grows

dried fruit, fresh fruit knd vege-
tables, herbs, cereals and fresh-
ly-baked goods.f
The Food Co-op on 802 S. State
just opened this past August and
already has over 1,000 members.
Applerose--another health food
store on Liberty St.-is in the
process of becoming a complete
natural foods grocery store, ac-
cording to owner Julian Moody.
Despite the growing number of
natural food stores in the city,
store owners say they have am-
ple business and no problems
with competition.
"We're all apparently making
a living, and have good work-
ing relationships w i t h each
other," says Robert McKee, co-

owner of Good Earth, a health
food store in Kerrytown.
Agreeing with McKee, Bill
Bolduc, co-owner of Eden's Na-
tural Food Store, says, "As far
as I'm concerned, the more
stores there are, the more peo-
ple. will eat the food."
The primary problei store
owners run into is a shortage in
supplies.
However, people in the health
food business are pleased at the
increasing demand for natural
food.
"We believe that people can
be better by eating organic food
that is alive," says a worker in
Your Health and Nutrition, lo-
cated on Ashley St.

4

r

K

0

Workshop on Defoliation

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.LS::

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12
Computing Ctr. .Short Course: J. Di-
Giuseppe. "Use of the Data Concen-
trator with MTS", Seminar Rm, Com-
puting Center, N. Campus, 3-5 pm.
Botany Seminar: M. Tatibana, Chiba
Univ., Japan "Bosynthesis of Carba-
myl Phosphate and its Control in
Mammals," 1139 Nat. Sci., 4 pm.
Physics Seminar: L. Stodolsky, SLAC,
"Report ion the Cornell Photon Con-
ference," P&A Colloquium Rm, 4 pm.

School of Music: The Stanley Quar-
tet, Rackhamn Aud., 8 p.m.
General Notices
Freshmen & Sophomores in LSA:
You may make appointments for Ad-
vanced Classification, first day was
Oct. 11; 1213 Angell Hall.
Sch. of Education: Walk-in Peer
Counseling now available for students
interested in,or already registered in
the School of Education, Rm 1228 SEB,
8:30 to 4:45, Mon.-Fri.

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, October 12 12:00 Noon
U.M. INTERNATIONAL CENTER
SUBJECT: "DEMOCRACY IN IRAN?"
Speakers: Mrs. Maryam Hastings
Rida Ebrahim Zadeh

I

Wed., 2 P.M.-Ecology
417 Detroit St.

Center

for info. 761-3186

Im

Cost: 50c
For Reservations
Call 662-5529

U-M PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
USHER APPLICATION
FOR
THE MENDELSSOHN SPECIAL SERIES

Sponso.red by Ecumenical

Campus
Center

.

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