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October 10, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


-

IHE MI C.HIGUAN DAILY Sunday, October 10, 1971

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ound press flourishes

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s were filed against the Ar-' woke us up to the plight of the
,,and its staff experienced dif- worker," says one spokesman for
t renting office space. the Journal, "and we realized that
January, 1970, the p a p e r SDS was not concerning itself
ne affiliated with the White with truly important issues."
s, and soon afterwards it Since then, its primary fune-
shaken by internal disputes. tion has been one of educating
°' y'eft the paper in February students and workers to the need
a policy disagreement with for building stronger unions and
in staff members, and with mutual alliances.
h deprture came a change in Putting out the paper is only
bai format of the Argus. part of their overall program,
coming more of a community- however, say its editors, as they
ned journal, it remained that also go out to factories and organ-
until its death on April 1971. ize actively. Over one-third of the
A raid on its headquarters paper's 6,000 copies are passed
s as financial difficulties out at factory gates including the
namong the major reasons cit- Chrysler plant in Detroit and both
or its collapse. of Ann Arbor's hospitals.
t by its very existence, t h e Representing a different line of
s did have a major impact thinking within the radical left is
e University and the com- the Ann Arbor Sun - the paper
y, Former Argus co-editor of the Rainbow People's Party
Krohn, '70, feels that the (RPP). Formerly part of the na-
"woke up" the establish- tional White Panthers organiz-
" edia to the world of the ation, RPP is now more con-
left. cerned with seeking alternative
I- cy ads, "The paper created institutions on a local level rather
ind of consciousness than national political issues.
students and adults, who The Sun reflects this increased
recognize at least that the community interest, devoting
h culture was a serious move- most .of its space to articles deal-
Its existence also paved the ing with Ann Arbor's youth cul-
for the three present papers ture - especially the various pro-
o theunderground circuit. jects of the city's Tribal Council.
Oldest among the current crop A few pieces covering the nation-
. uaperg is the Up Against The al political scene are still included
Sect Journal which first as well as columns by imprisoned
a ined in January. 1970. It too Party leaders Pun Plamondon and
undergone a great m a n y John Sinclair.
nges before arriving at its cur- Like the staff members of Up
r osition as a paper closely Against the Wall Street Journal,
l d with the workers' move- the people working for the Siti
nt. consider the paper only a part of
iginally, it was used as t h e their total commitment to organ-
nzing tool for the campus ize programs on a local level. The
s for a Democratic Society importance of this two-fold ac-
SiS) chapter. One of the pap- tivity was emphasized by one Sun
resent staff members, who editor who said, "The main dif-
as.aso with it in its founding ference between the White Pan-
says of the early Journal, "It thers and the Rainbow Party is
d a lot of propaganda the fact that we are now actual-
S as using at the time to jus- ly practicing what was once only
programs. We even ran rhetoric."
1 articles defending trash- The newest addition to Ann Ar-
a revolutionary act." bor's underground circuit is a li-
fall's General M o t o r s 'bertarian paper - called Defiance.
showever,signalled the end Published by Karen Haas '74sand
S Journal's association with Ron Rossi, '74 the paper presents
~P. t as then that the paper a striking contrast to the radical
Iccetnedeely nvoled iththephilosophies normally associated

Local Moratorium plans made
(Continued from Page 1) ;rand jury on Oct. 14. His sub-
civil rights movement in Milwau- poena parallels those leveled
kee; Zolton Ferency, former against several other anti-war
chairman of the Michigan Demo- figures. Local PCPJ leader Dave
cratic Party and war critic; Jay Gordon called. the action "an ob-
Craven, PCPJ leader, an organizer vious slap in the face to the anti-
of last years May Day and NPAC war movement."
leader James Lafferty. "Action workshops" will follow
Antiwar activist and linguist the Hill convocation. While these
Noam Chomsky originally sched- are still flexible, definite plans
uled to appear at Hill, was sub- have been made for a workshop
poenaed by a Washington, D. C. on the Detroit House of Correc-
tion, one led by Lafferty on the
T } fall peace offensive, and another
free 'U' to open led by black nationalist Robert
Williams on the Angela Davis
(Continued from Page 1) case.
steering committee member com- A midnight rally on the Diag
mented, "You have to want to will cap what AACEW leaders pre-
learn to get anything out of it." dict will be almost 24 hours of
The concept of a free university continuous anti-war activity.
originated at the University of
California in Berkeley with theo s
Free Speech Movement of 1964 toW hopsaTo
colleges. (Continued from Page 2)
But the prototypical free uni- pen. The photography and edit-
versities failed for lack of commit- ing were a little inane-continu-
ted participants. In those early ous cuts for no real reason, snots
days, just a few classes would last of people's feet, and a lot of
the entire semester with the 1e- poorly composed close-ups that
mainder dissolving after three or would have s h a m e d Sergio
four weeks. Leone.
The first local free university There are moments when The
began in 1966, attracting over 300 Todd Killings shows some sign
persons. But it too folded along of life in the minds that cre-
with the others throughout the ated it, but these were overkilled
country. and never used to their poten-
There have been several free tial-near the end of the film
universities since then, the most Siperdee gives the 'motives for
recent in the fall of 1969. At that killing: "It was a boring eve-
time, Mark Tillotson of the Wayne ning and we had nothing else
State University's free university to do." Now, if the director had
and Terry Moers, then secretary concentrated on that theme
in the Office of Student Organiza- without the rest of the nonsense,
tions (OSO) decided to again start the film might have stirred a
a free university here. little. But no; this is followed by
University Activities C e n t e r your paranoid psychopath rap-
(UAC) also aided the fledgling or- "I had to test my power-by
ganization by supplying free office killing her," and the film rolls
space and "seed money." back downhill from there. It's
The Free U has been going like the suburban garden . . . a
strong ever since, and is now self lawn. Instead of flowers to add
supporting, although UAC still sup- variety, a pink plastic flamingo
plies office space. is added "to give it some class."

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In perhaps his greates
pies through Petronius Arlbi Rome.
Nero's Romne.

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auditorium a
angell hal

379:30& :30p.m.
color still only 75c
presented by thae nn o n b in; erctivc

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xr ers nmvemein. Iie strike

L LETIN
nes: Johns. Hopkins Univ.-Sch, of In-
'En al Studies, Social Security Ad-

with the underground movement.
Stressing ideas of individual
liberty, it attacks both the left
and right for their lack of ideo-
logical consistency. Big govern-
ment, the war, the draft, nation-
alized industries and strong un-
ions all come under attack for
their repression of the individ-
ual

LSA Student Government
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
as vacancy
Sign-ui for interviews
Mon.-Thurs. 4-5:30 p.m.
Room 3M, Michigan Union

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presents
Air-
craft Seats Carrier Nos o. h Return Price
DC-9 94 Air Con 001 w, t ssi w n 1 1 24 11 28 $189
DC-9 94 Air Can 003 '] ] Win. 1 1 28 1 4 $179
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DC-8 250 Univer C '311 3 3 $179
DC-8 195 KIM 207 ]D unich Dei 12 27 1 9 $299
Price includes round trip jet airfare PLUS hoel ciomoations. (Airfare only also
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vacation in Mexico, Nassau, or Austri;n A;S. F r'further info, please contact UAC
Travel, 2nd Floor, Student Union, 10 .n-5 p ., ~63-2147.
OPEN ONLY TO U-M FACULTY, STAFFS, ST UENT & iIMMEDIATE FAMILY.
ALUMNI ELIGIBLE FOR CERTA N FLGHT5; PLEASE CALL

Mr.i . Oct. 21

Univ. of Rochester

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to 111

-'c18h. of iMgmt;
.?''lOct. 2> - Vanderbilt Univ.-Law 1
u ce Corps & Vista will be on cam-
- C1P the week of Nov. 8-12.
A. will send rep. to campus some-
:'ter 15th. Will announce in
S0iYER PLACEMENT, STUDENTS:
11 ' the time to think ahead - to
en o irhas toward a summer job. Don't
h be 1ght napping! Summer Place-
im m0 is o}en. Come in, browse, ask
: inons.

s
AR MACRAME
Y Am
ai
SIIPPLIP; !

A4

or
'Uv

OCT. 7-17th

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Do
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01'

Sthe student body:
Genuine
" Authentic
Navy
$25
Sizes 34 to 50
State Street at Liberty

WOOL 99c/SKEIN
(4 oz. knitting worsted weight)
ORLON/SAYELLE $1.09
(4 oz. k. w. weight)

JUTE 83c/SKEIN
(70 yard tube)
AUNT LYDIA'S RUG YARN 3Oc
170 yds.-cotton and rayon)

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REGULAR STOCK--ALL COLORS
and a
SURPRISE SPECIAL
We carry a full line of patterns, needles, rug backings, sewing notions, needlecraft accessories and in-
struction books.
university cel ar
THE STUDENT STORE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE UNION
open 9 a.m.-1 1 p.m. M-Th, 9-5 Friday and Saturdays, 12-5 Sundays

11
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Joe Orton
Ri }Y3
Georges Schehade'
Vasco
Bruce Jay Friedman
Henrik Ibsen
A Doll's

(Trueblood)

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(Arena)

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ud fhophormores in
;ke cippointrments for
15f /g ondcy, Oct. 1
2'3 Arngel! Hall
yJm
Kusnammers

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(Arena)
A13e14n15
(Arena)

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T"4 Mir tgau Battv
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CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
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DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-- 12:30 p.m.
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