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October 10, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 10, 1971

Orioles
in Sen
BALTIMORE (W) - Merv Ret- the Pira
teninund, frequently overshad- 3-0 leadi
owed by a cast of Baltim o r e But th
superstars, cracked a decisive Ellis, wh
three-run homer and left-hand- a sore e
er Dave McNally settled down only 2-
to pitch a three-hitter as the- ager Dan
Orioles began defense of their call forr
world championship by defeat- Frank
ing Pittsburgh 5-3 yesterday. oles star
Frank Robinson and Don Bu- second in
ford also homered in a dis- pitch irit
play of Baltimore power but ers foro
Rettenmund's shot, off contro- 13 postse
versial Dock Ellis, brought t h e Ellis, a
Orioles from behind in t h e ing the/
third ining for a 4-3 lead they any furth
never surrendered. but imm
McNally, meanwhile, extended challenge
the Orioles' season-ending win- when sh
ning streak to 15 games cover- led offa
ing 11 regular season g am s, After
.three playoffs and this World Ellis cot:
Series opener by methodically lenge. B
mowing down the Pirates' pow- and tha
er hitters. mund, th
Shaken for three. unearned outfielder
runs in the second inning when leading h
the usually flawless fielding lar seaso
Orioles made two errors, Mc- shadowe
Nally was touched for his third Powell,I
and final hit in the t h i r d Brooks R
inning, then retired 19 men in This I
order before Manny Sanguillen Rettenniu
reached base on an error in the picked a
ninth Inning. the Balti
McNally, who is facetiously the leftf
called Dave McLucky by his Ellis p
Oriole teammates because they ell on a3
have frequently taken him off all for h
the hook after a slow start, on in rel
needed their help again. after tim of Bu

el
tes ha
in the
ae bub
o has
lbow,
innin
nny M
relief.
Robin
ted wh
nning
o the
only h
mason
a 19-gf
regula
her tro
ediate
ed aga
ortstor
with a
strikir
uldn't
uford
t brot
he 5-fo
r who
hitter
n but
d ons a
Frank
Robins
time,
fund's
2-1 pi
imore
field b
roceed
3-2 pit
im as.
ief. M
luford's

sink Pira
s opener
ad given Ellis a er in the fifth inning that gave
second inning. McNally some additional work-
ble-gum chewing ing room.
been troubled by But McNally, who threw 53 of
was able to last his 117 pitches in the first three
igs before Man- innings, didn't need it. He shut
urtaugh had to the Pirates off completely while
walking only two and striking
son got the Ori- out nine.
ien he led off the Yet when the Pirates began
by tagging a 1-1 chipping away in the second in-
left field bleach- ning, with the aid of Oriole er-
iis second hit in rors, it appeared that McNally
at-bats. might not even be around as
ame winner dur- long as Ellis.
r season, escaped The trouble began for the
uble at that stage four-time 20-game winner when
ly found himself he walked Bob Robertson on a
in in the third 3-2 pitch to open the second
p Mark Belanger inning and wild pitched him to
single. second.
ig out McNally, Sanguillen then bounced to
meet the chal- shortstop MarkBelanger, who
singled to right tried to cut down Robertson
ight up Retten- heading for third. But his throw
)ot-10, 195-pound hit Robertson and rolled into
was the club's the Baltimore dugout, enabling
during the regu- the Pirate first baseman to race
remained over- home with the game's first run.
club with Boog McNally then threw out Jose
Robinson a n d Pagan as Sanguillen took third.
on. But when Jackie Hernandez
however, it was bunted in front of the plate,
show, and he McNally couldn't get Sanguillen
itch to drive over coming home and catcher Ellie
bullpen and into Hendricks let the throw get by
leachers. him.
ed to walk Pow- That enabled Hernandez to
ch, and that was reach second and, after Ellis
Bob Moose came struck out, Hernandez raced
oose was the vic- home with the third run on a
first pitch hom- single by Dave Cash.1

tes

5-3
An inning later McNally was
in trouble again as Roberto Cle-
mente led off with a single and
Willie Stargell followed with a
walk. But McNally struck out
Robertson and Sanguillen . and
got Pagan on an easy fly.
And that as it turned out was
the Pirates' last threat.
But it was only the beginning
for the Orioles, who chased El-
lis to a loud chorus of boos and
a handkerchief-waving sendoff
as they took a 1-0 lead in the
competition for the $15,000 top
prize and a second successive
world championship.
The second game of the best-
of-seven series is scheduled for
t o d a y but the weatherman
predicted an 80 per cent chance
of rain for the 2 p.m., EDT,
starting time. Baltimore Man-
ager Earl Weaver had named
right-hander Jim Palmer, 20-
9, to go against right-hander
Bob Johnson, 9-10.

-Associated Press
BALTIMORE PITCHING ACE, Dave McNally, gets the 1971 World Series underway with a pitch to Pittsburgh Pirate second baseman
Dave Cash. McNally, who got off to a. shaky start giving up three unearned runs in the second inning, retired nineteen men at one
stretch before allowing catcher Manny Sanguillen to reach base in the ninth. Once again, McNally's teammates bailed him out, blast-
ing two homers as the Birds came from behind to smash the Pirates, 5-3.

HUSKIES THINNED:
Sooners

r

past

Longhorns

--;

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CONTROVERSY SERIES
LES TER MADDOX
TALKS ON: BUSING
WAGE-PRICE FREEZE

t
4
1
3
{J
tt
1
t
1
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t

By The Associated Press
DALLAS - Shrimp - sized
Greb Pruitt, a 176-pound meteor,
blazed for three touchdowns and
over 200 yards rushing yesterday
to give the 8th-ranked Oklahoma
Sooners a 48-27 victory overy 3rd-
ranked Texas in a brutal, sledge-
hammer war of wishbone of-
fenses.
The five - foot - nine Pruitt, a
junior from Houston, dashed
through and around the Long-
horn flanks virtually unmolested
as he piled up 219 yards rushing;
in 21 sorties.
Pruitt pranced to touchdowns
on runs of 1, 4 and 20 yards as
undefeated Oklahoma used the
ground thundering Wishbone-T
offense made famous by Texas for

an awesome 425 yards on 'the
ground.
Oklahoma piled up a 31 - 21
halftime lead after Texas took
brief leads of 7-0 and 14-7 in the
early going.
Stanford strikes
SEATTLE - Stanford's Indians
tomahawked Sonnk Sixkiller, the
Cherokee quarterback, and rode a
series of Washington mistakes to
a 17-6 Pacific-Eight Conference
yesterday over the previously un-
beaten Huskies.
The blitzing Stanford defense
dumped Sixkiller for losses to-
taling 42 yards in the first half
and Benny Barnes picked off
three tosses from 1970's nation-
al passing champion.

The defending Pac-8 champs
jumped to a 14-0 lead in the first
period. After Larry Butler threw
Sixkiller for an 11-yard loss, a
poor punt went out of bounds on
the Washington 32. Stanford's
quarterback, Don Bunce, passed
20 yards to John Winesberry for
the first touchdown.

State, thwarted most of the first
half by a rash of mistakes, scored
five touchdowns in a span of 11
minutes, three by fancy-stepping
Lydell Mitchell, enroute to a 42-
0 college football victory oyer
Army yesterday.
The Nittany Lions, 4-0 and
ranked ninth, began the on-

10th - ranked Bulldogs shredded
the Mississippi defense with hard
running sophomores Andy John-
son and Jimmy Poulos yesterday
to smash the Rebels 38-7 i. a
Southeastern Conference football
battle.
Buffaloes boffo
AMES, Iowa- J. B. Dean
kicked a 32-yard fourthBquarter
field goal and came up with a
final-minutes interception yester-
day to spark fifth-ranked Colora-
do to a 24-14 Big Eight con-
ference football victory over Iowa
State.

I

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R EVEN U E-SHARING
PRIVATE ENTERPRISE

slaught with eight seconds let
the first half when John Hufne
COLUMBIA, Mo. - Top-ranked hit Scott Skarzynski with a
Nebraska's Jeff Kinney broke yard touchdown pass that m
loose for two touchdowns yester- the halftime score 7-0.
day and the Cornhuskers went on
to a 36-0 Big Eight Conference Bulldogs bop
football victory over Missouri, ex- JACKSON, Miss - Geor
'tending their unbeaten streak to
24 games.::
It took the Cornhuskers, who r
piled up 330 yards total offense in Colle
the first half, 21 minutes, 18 sec-
onds to find the range, but once SCORES
they did there seemed little doubt GRIDDE PICKINGS:
about the outcome. MICHIGAN 24, Michigan State 13
Nebraska sandwiched a safety Ohio state 24, Illinois 10
between Kinney's touchdown runs Wisconsin 35, Indiana 29
Of 1 and 3 yards. Purdue 27, Minnesota 13
yar.Northwestern 28, Iowa 3
Kansas 29, Kansas State 13
Tigers tweek Oklahoma 48, Texas 27
AUBURN, Ala. - Pat Sullivan Georgia 38, Mississippi 7
Stanford 17, Washington6
srifled three touchdown passes yes- Penn state 42, Army 0
terday giving fourth-ranked Au- Toledo 24, Bowling Green 7
burn a shaky 27-14 football vic- Harvard 21, Columbia 19
tory over a Southern Mississippi Delaware 48, Lafayettes0
Northern Illinois 37, Marshall 18
team that led 14-7 at halftime. Citadel 25, VMI 24
Terry Beasley, the other half of. Ohio U. 35, Kentucky 6
Auburn's famed Pat and Terry North Carolina State 24,
Show, equaled his own record Wake Forest 14
with 11 pass completions which Idaho 40, Idaho state 3
accounted for 100 yards and one DAILY LIBELS 99,
touchdown. Anonymous Eunuchs 0
East
Military muscled Cornell 19, Princeton 8
Pittsburgh 36, Navy 35
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.-Penn Yale 17, Brown 10

ge Score

t in
aagel
14-
ade
gia's.

. J' 1

HILL AUDITORIUM

lkS ::

Slippery Rock 34, Shippensburg 7
Dartmouth 19, Pennsylvania 3
South
Notre Dame 17, Miami 0
Clemson 3, Duke 0
West Virginia 28, William & Mary 23
Tulane 37, North Carolina 29
Tennessee 10, Georgia Tech 6
Syracuse 21, Maryland 13
Florida State 27, Mississippa St 9
Auburn 27, South Mississippi 14
Alabama 42, Vanderbilt 0
Midwest
East Michigan 17, West Kentucky 14 '
Colorado 24, Iowa State 14
West Michigan 31, Kent State 0
Arkansas 35, Baylor 7
Texas Tech 28, Texas A&M 7
Far West
Air Force 30, South Methodist 0
Arizona State 42, Colo State Univ. 0
Wyoming 14, Arizona 3
NHL
Minnesota 4, Detroit 2
Chicago 4, St. Louis 2
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2
, New York 4, Montreal 4

4

SUNDAY, OCT. 70-2 P.M.

$1.25

Tickets on Sale in Fishbowl and Union Lobby
Also available at the door

I.3

I

4

COMING OCT. 24: DAVID HARRIS

U

a

+

Use Daily Classifieds

Muggers split against Spartans

+

U

Give The
Bear a break.
You're the only one who can.
Because all Smokey can do is ask you to help prevent forest fires.
He can't break your matches. Or douse your campfires. Or snuff out
your cigarets.
Only you can.
So, please, lend Smokey a hand.
And maybe while you're at it, lend him your voice too: tell people to
give the bear a break.
He deserves it.
So does America. _t

By CHUCK DRUKIS
Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING - Michigan's
Blue ruggers were a day late and
a dollar short. A last second at-
tempt to pull out a victory died
when Michigan's Ron Smith was
driven out of bounds inches short
of the end zone to preserve the
Michigan State 4-3 triumph.
Michigan drove within the
State five yard line at least six
times, but choked on each occa-
sion.
Playing on a field that was 20
yards too narrow and 20 yards too
short, the open field running of
M i c h i g a n became impos-
sible. State, at an apparent ad-
vantage, because of the field di-
mensions, was able to stop the
Bluebbefore the wings could get
the ball.
Early in the first half fullback
Dick Moon broke through several
Spartans but was tackled short

of the endzone. When Michigan
failed to follow up the play, State
moved the ball back down the
field, but failed to score after
an errant pass.
After getting the ball back into
Spartan territory, Michigan re-
ceived a 15 yard penalty kick, but
failed to convert as the ball sliced
off Richard Thompson's foot.
The Blue again failed to score
when Cleland Child picked up his
own kick through the mark on
the four yard line, but was tack-
led on the run. Poor Michigan
rucking allowed State to kick the
ball away, which State recovered.
After several passes and missed
tackles by Michigan, State scored
a try but failed on the conver-
sion.
Michigan losththeir offensive
momentum for the remainder of
the half. However, when State
was p e n a 1 i z e d for off-
sides, Thompson put the Blue on

-Associated Press
TED GRIGNON didn't think fast enough on this play as the
Western Michigan quarterback is dropped for a five yard loss by
Kent State's Jack Lambert. Grignon must have done something
right, however, as the Broncos won 31-0.

the board with a 35 yard penalty
kick.
The frustrations of the Blue
Ruggers became apparent shortly
after the start of the second half.
Thompson attempted another 35
yard penalty kick, only to watch
it rebound off the crossbar.
Numerous Blue drives were
whistled back for knock-ons.
When Michigan again had a
chance to'take the lead on a' 30
yard penalty kick, Thompson's
kick never reached the proper
height to clear the goal posts.
3 Several Michigantattempts to
cross into the Spartan endzone
were frustrated by kicks, sending
them back into their own terri-
tory until Smith's determined run
which was stopped just short as
time expired.
The Michigan Gold, however,
fared better than the Blue. The
Gold ran up two tries in each half
plus one conversion (18) to noth-
ing for the Spartans. John Bohl-
ke scored the first two tries for
the Gold with some artful run-
ning. Forwards Chris Penowar and
Steve Chapman scored the other
two while Chapman also made
one out of four conversions.
For the student body:
FLARES
by
SLevi
Farah
$ Wright

I

The Most Useful Coupon You May Ever Rip Out ...
Say It, Sell It, Seek It-Thru Daily Classifieds

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UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES
WORDS 1 day 2 days 3 days 4 days 5 days 6 days add.
0-10 1.00 2.00 2.40 3.20 3 90 4.50 .55
11-15 1.15 2.30 2.90 3.90 480 5.60 .75
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36-40 2.30 . 4.60 6.30 8.20 10.00 11.60 1.50
41 -45 9 5 5 10 95 9 oflCin 95 ' 1970 1 AS

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