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October 09, 1971 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 9, 1971

THEM-HIGN AIY1Studay Otoer-, 97

Race
By BOB ANDREWS
After a dismal showing against
the non - conference competition
(winning just nine of 25 con-
tests), today the Big Ten grid-
ders will unleash their not-so-
awesome attacks against each
other.
In one of today's feature con-
tests, two of the dark horses of
the conference, Minnesota and
Purdue, will battle at Lafayette.
Bot squads post 1-0 conference
records and realize that a loss
would virtually wipe out any
slim hopes they entertained about
a trip to the Roses this winter.
The Boilermakers, after a dis-
heartening 8-7 loss to Notre
Dame, rebounded last week to
smash Iowa, 46-13. The Gophers
enjoyed similar success, as, in' a
mild upset, Coach Murray Wor-
math's squad slipped by Kansas.
Purdue, ranked third in the
conference in total offense (29
points a game), has raised havoc
against opponents both on the
ground and in the air.
Quarterback Gary Danielson
has connected over fifty per-
cent of the time, with his favorite
target being end Rick Sayers (12
receptions for 174 yards).
Supplementing Danielson is the
backfield power supplied by full-
back Otis Armstrong, third among

belin4
Big Ten rushers with more than
88 yards amassed each game.
Gopher signal caller, Craig Cur-
ry, leading the Big Ten in total
offense, will most likely concen-
trate his attack to the air, as
Purdue, second in rushing de-
fense, ranks dead last in pass de-
fense.
After facing four tough oppo-
nents, the Northwestern Wild-
cats should breathe easier against
Iowa, winless so far this year.
Usually considered a passing
team, the recent main line of at-
tack for the Wildcats has been
on the ground as running backs
Randy Arnderson and Al Robin-
son have ground out the yard-
age.
One possible reason for this
shift of plans could be substan-
tiated by the statistics for quar-
terback Marty Daigneau. Daig-
neau has hit on 49 of 104 passes
touchdowns.
Iowa Coach Frank Lauterbur
for 608 yards and only two
claims, "our attitude remains
good. Despite the score (45-13),
our overall performance at Pur-
-due was better. Defensively, we hit
harder and got to the ball better".
Northwestern, however, should
have little trouble running against
the Hawkeyes, who have allowed
352 yards on the ground as well

for

as yielding 43.5 points per game.
Almost all of the entire Hawk-
eye offense is generated by one
man - Levi Mitchell, who has
caught 15 passes and run for 228
yards in 56 carries.
Illinois finally traversed the
goal line for the first time last
week, but in the process, were
run all over the field by Sonny
Sixkiller of Washington, 52-14.
Today, the Illini (0-1) must
face the wrath of the Ohio State
Buckeyes (1-0).
First year coach for Illinois,

feague
Bob Blackman, is disturbed with'
his team's performance thus far
stating, "Our shortcomings are
pretty obvious". The most ob-
vious shortcoming has been the
passing attack of junior Mike!
Wells, who has completed just 20
of 48 tosses for 199 yards.
By contrast, the Buckeye quar-
terback, Don Lamka, has hit on
75 per cent of his aerials for 408
yards. End Dick Wakefield has
snared 16 passes this season as
Lamka's prime target. The Ohio'
State offense is even more im-

title

I

pressive with the running attack
Lamka has as support.
Fullback John Bledsoe, -as well
as the versatile Lamka, are rank-
ed in the top nine in Big Ten
rushing.
Rounding out the schedule will
be Indiana at Wisconsin, a game
that will force the relatively life-
less Hoosiers to cope with the
potent Badger offense highlight-
ed by leading Big Ten rusher,
Rufus Ferguson (96 yards per
game) and talented signal caller,
Neil Graff.

.

-Daiy-S a Krulwich
NORTHWESTERN'S PAT KERSHAW (60) and Jack Derning (83) move in to make the tackle on
Michigan running back Billy Taylor (42) in this year's opening game for both teams. North-
western travels to. Iowa today to try and improve their 1-1 conference record.

Freshmen and Sophomores in

Freshmen and Sophomores in
LS&A may make appointments for
Advance Classification

PLAYS PLAYER:
Nicklaus slams into golf finals

beginning M
at 1213

ionday, Oct.
Angell Hall

11

-

r CONTROVERSY SERIES
LESTER MADDOX

TALKS ON:

BUSSING
WAGE-FREEZE
REVENUE-SHARING
PRIVATE ENTERPRISE

HILL AUDITORIUM
Sunday, Oct. 10-2 P:M.
$1.25 Tickets on sale in Fishbowl and Union Lobby
Also available at the door
,COMING OCT. 24: DAVID HARRIS
The Foremost Symphonic
Military Band in the World
See and Hear
"The President's Own"
United Slates Marine Band
At Ann Arbor Pioneer High School
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10
Special Matinee 3:00 p.m.-All seats $1.00
Evening Concert 7:00 p.m.-$2.00 & $3.00
Profits to charities of Ann Arbor Eastern and Western Kiwanis
TICKETS ON SALE AT:
" Ulrich's Bookstore
" Ann Arbor Bank (Packard-Brockman Branch)
* Westgate Standard Service
* Arbor Hills Hardware
- Huron Valley National Bank (West Stadium Branch)
ALSO-Pioneer High School ticket office-Sunday only

VIRGINIA WATER, England (;)r
-America's Jack Nicklaus andI
South Africa's Gary Player, two
golf giants, slammed their way
into the final of the Picadilly worldY
match play championship yester-I
day.,
Nicklaus, who will be bidding for1
his second straight match play
title today over the 6,997-yard, par-
74 Wentworth course, thrashedr
SEngland's Neil Coles 7 and 5 in
one 36-hole semifinal.
Player, a three-time winner of
this unique $60,000 tournament
matching eight top stars in face-
to-face matches, eliminated New
Zealand's Bob Charles 2 and 1 in
the other.
Nicklaus and Player met in the
1966 title match, won by Player
6 and 4.1
But Nicklaus is the heavy favo-I
rite this year to collect the topI
prize of $20,400.
Nicklaus, top money winner on
the world circuit this year with
$207,080, started the day's play as
a 6-4 betting favorite. Player
was listed by the London odds-
makers at 5-2.
Nicklaus' putting worries in his!
For the student body:
LEVI'Si
CORDUROY
Slim Fits . . . $6.98
(All Colors)(
Bells .....$8.50
DENIM
Bush Jeans . $10.00
Bells.......$8.00
Boot Jeans . $7.50
Pre-Shrunk . $7.50
Super Slims . $7.00

match against Coles, a British "Ibegan playing semi-sloppy,
Ryder Cup star, were unfounded. trying to finish it," Nicklaus said
Two massive putts of 45 feet of being 8-up at the 22nd-and the
and 33 feet at the eighth and ninth balding Englishman won the, next
holes gave him a 2-up lead, and three.
he delivered what turned out to be Nicklaus then focused his con-
a death blow by winning six of centration and moved majestically
eight holes from the 15th to the to 7-up with seven to play.
22nd. At the 437-yard 31st, Coles was
On the 17th Nicklaus struck two short of the green in three and
mighty three-woods and rolled in ( picked up his ball to concede the
a 12-foot putt for an eagle three. match.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - An
overpowering performance by Stan
Smith, the cannonballing GI from
Pasadena, Calif., sent the United
States into a 1-0 lead over Ro-
mania yesterday but the cliff-
hanging second 'match between
Frank Froehling III of Fort Lau-
derdale, Fla., and Ion Tiriac was
halted by darkness with the score
6-6 in the fifth set of the 1971
Davis Cup challenge round.
The dramatic second singles
match will be completed today,
just before the doubles match send-
ing Smith and 20-year-old Erik
Van Dillen of San Mateo, Calif.,
against Tiriac and Ilie Nastase.
Smith, the reigning U.S. Open
champion and runnerup at Wim-
bledon, c r u s h e d Nastase, Ro-
mania's No. 1 ace, with unexpect-
ed ease 7-5, 6-3, 6-1.
The Romanians' big hope was in
snatching Smith's blond scalp in
the first match and immediately
putting the Yanks against the wall.
But the 6-foot-4 Smith, runner-
up at Wimbledon this year and
winner of the U.S. Open at Forest
Hills, was in no mo'od to be so
demeaned. He refused to wilt un-
der the strong first set comeback
by the brilliant Nastase and pro-
ceeded to win his ninth Davis Cup
test without a loss.
"I think it was because we are
much more tournament tough than
the Romanians who went home to
rest after Forest Hills," Smith
said afterward.
"When Nastase came back at
me in the first set I didn't get too
worried. I decided to hit my best
shots and let the chips fall. I was
used to such pressure."
Then Froehling, called "the
Spider" because of the arms and
legs which dangle from his 6-foot-

5 frame, fought back from what
seemed sure to be disaster to
throw his match against the sin-
ister-looking Tiriac into darkness.
He appeared a certain loser af-
ter dropping the first two sets 3-6,
1-6, but stormed back with his
a w k w a r d, roundhouse forehand
and smashing overheads to take
the next two 6-1, 6-3 from the
bushy bear from Brasov.
Froehling served at 5-3 after a
service break in the sixth game
and had match point, but missed
the sidelines by a scant one-half
inch with a slashing forehand.
A crowd of 5,000 at the Julian
J. Clark Tennis Stadium, bored
through the first four hours of
play, was brought to a screaming
pitch by the comeback of Froeh-
ling, whose selection to the team
provoked a great deal of contro-
versy.
Many tennis observers felt the
U.S. captain, Ed Turville of St.
Petersburg, Fla., had made a mis-
take in picking the string-bean
Floridian over the more experi-
enced Clark Graebner of New
York.
The Froehling - Tiriac m a t c h,
which finished in semi-darkness,
was marked by constant bicker-
ing and hassles over line calls.
Four times Harry Hopman, the
old Australian Davis Cup champion
serving as referee, was called out
of his chair at the sidelines to
arbitrate bitter differences, once
at match point.
Tiriac is a nortorious court vil-
lain, hulking always scowling,
with a horseshoe mustache and a
shock of black, curly hair. He
looks like a heavy out of a Holly-
wood whodunit movie and plays
the part to the hilt.
For two sets he was the master
of the gangling veteran from Flo-

-Associated Press
JACK NICKLAUS plays a bunk-

-Associated Press

Stan Smith stretches for return

Smith, Froehi ng spark U.S.
to Davis Cup challenge edge

I

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

New, , i c-AL MAG.AZktlC
IN him JN P:C'yO
PRI=t." CoN~hi t?~'flOt4S
A~RE SOU~l)T I N FiELt6a
ow PCUL$c..o.G)y"
PGE' RY. iV4ZRTE ft.- L ~4&
wrip~iv, 2L1.4 t'ARROW MOD~1
TR MiL., ParARk3OR, 0405,
OR CALL o~t3tt .-

er shot in yesterday's Picadilly
Match Play Golf Championship.
The blond belter from Columbus
defeated Neil Coles and meets
Gary Player in today's final
round.
SEVEN
SAMURAI
not only Kurosawa's
most vital film ...
perhaps the best
Japanese film ever"
-Donald Richie
TONIGHT-Nat. SO.
7 & 9 30 p.m. $1.25
Michigan Film Society
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

rida, jerking the white-hatted bean-
stalk around the court with deft
placements, lobs and drop shots.
He hardly made a mistake as he
won the two sets with effortless
ease.
But in the third set, Froehling,
who had been missing with his
roundhouse forehand and who had
been unable to get to the net be-
hind his blockbuster service, found
the range and proceeded to blow
the tiring Tiriac off the court.
He unleashed 16 service aces on
a clay surface which doesn't lend
itself to such untouchable shots,
but Wad nine double faults.
The fifth set was brought to a
stirring climax when Froehling
scored a break in the sixth gamg'
with a searing forehand passing
shot off a Tiriac smash. But Tiriac
rebroke in the ninth game and pr
ceeded to swap services unti
Hopman halted the match.
Pae-8 1K0's
California
SAN FRANCISCO (JP - The
Pacific-8 Conference excluded the
University of California from 1971
conference football standings yes-
terday and any consideration as
the league's 1972 Rose Bowl repre-
sentative until an appeal of Gal's
N9AA probationary status is de-
cided.
The ruling by the Pacific-8 Con-
ference's presidents and chancel-
lors was made on a 5-3 vote fol-
lowing a telephone conference and
came on the eve of the Golden
Bears' conference opener at Berke-
ley today against Oregon State.
In the event of a successful ap-
peal of the NCAA probationary
status during the season, the pres-
idents and chancellors said, results
of the Bears conference games will
be officially recognized.
Pac-8 Executive Director Wiles
Hallock said the presidents and
chancellors also made a request
that the NCAA expedite a decision
on further appeal that the Univer-
sity of California now is preparing
in addition to one already filed.

1

TOM & HARRY'S WATERBED FANS!
Super Garga[tuan WITH STUDENT
KING
QUEEN (
DOUBLE
SINGLE 1
{

L

PROF. MARVIN FELHEIM
Dept. of English
SPEAKS ON
"RACIAL and RELIGIOUS IMAGES
in the AMERICAN FILM"
following Lox and Bagels brunch
Sunday, Oct. 10, 11:30 A.M.

*

IT

In Honor of Dr. Leroy Waterman
THE THIRD ANNUAL
WATERMAN LECTURES
Sunday and Monday, October 11 and 12, 1971
Waterman Lecturer: DR. NORMAN PERRIN
PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

HILLEL

1429 HILL

7 5c

Lighthouse
Fanny
Kansas City Jammers
Rushfield
Saturday, October 16

For the student body:
Genuine
Authentic
A Navy
PEA COATS
$25

SUNDAY:l

11:00 A.M., Sermon at First Baptist Church
"The Parable of the Prodigal Son in
the Twentieth Century"

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