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October 08, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-08

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I Friday, October 8, 1971

THE MICHIGAN UAI Y

Page Seven'

Friday, October 8, 1971 THE MICHIGAN UAILY Page Seven

U' forms commission
on minority pro bems
The University has established versity efforts to implement the is broadly based in racial compo-
a new Commission on Minority "Equal Employment Opportunity sition, and representative of fac-'
groups to work to assure racial Affirmative Action Program" in- ulty and non-faculty staff, as well
equality in employment opportuni- itiated in September, 1969. as numerous academic depart-
ties. Chaired by Assistant to the ments and administrative offices
The week-old commission paral- President for Human Relations of the University. Racial distribu-
lels the older Commission on Wo- Affairs William Cash, Jr., the new tion of the 14 member commission
men established last winter to commission reports to Fedele is described as including blacks,
work on problems of equality in Fauri, vice president for state re- Chicanos, American Indians, Ori-
employment opportunities for wo- lations and planning. entals and whites.
en. Both commissions are Uni- Membership on the commission Cash says it is still too early

AFTER FOUR YEARS:
U' unit reviews performance
of Residential College

Continued from Page 1)
would be to "cut down on some
distribution requirements" pres-j
ently prerequisites for BA, and BS
degrees in the college.
Frank Rhodes, dean of the lit-
erary college, said action by thej
parent organization on these and!
other requests would hinge on the
recommendations of the commit-
r tee, due in January.

tee recommends there seems to be tive" about the idea of keeping
a common feeling among its mem- the RC.
bers that the RC has been a "I would rule put the possibility
worthwhile experirpent worth con- that it (the committee) would
tinuing, recommend the elimination of;
"Almost everyone I've talked the Residential College," Murphey!
to," said Scott, "has been posi- added.

Student applicants sought
for LSA advisor panel
As the selection process begins which time a mechanism will be
for the long awaited Student-Fac- developed for "screening" appli-
ulty Policy Committee of the lit- cants for the committee.
erary college, LSA Student Gov- According to literary, college
ernment officials are urging stu- Dean Frank Rhodes a committee
dents to petition to be named to has been formed to submit names
the new advisory body. which along with nominations from
The committee, approved by the the floor, will be voted on at the
literary college faculty last spring next meeting of the faculty.
is a 10-student, 10-faculty-member Faculty sources have said the
body empowered to discuss al mat- Flcty sould be comdlte
ters before the college, and to selection should be completed
make proposals and recommenda- "within a month" and Weissman
tions to the faculty body. said he believes it important that
sthe students be "ready to go as
Steve Weissman of LSA Student, ona h aut.
Government said yesterdgy the soon as the faculty."
government is urging interested Students interested in sitting on
students to apply for the commit- the commission, Weissman said,
tee to show their "sincerity" in can apply for membership by go-
wanting a voice in the school. ing to the LSA Student Govern-
LSA Student Government will be ment offices on the third floor of
holding its "first full meeting" on the Michigan Union weekdays be-
Wednesday Weissman said, at! tween 4 and 5 p.m.
IU

Nixon sets plans for
wage-price re straints

to describe exactly what steps the - To meet its January deadline.
commission hopes to take concern- the committee has been meeting
ing minority employment prob- as a group, once a week hearing
lems, but President Robben Flem- testimony from RC administra-
ing has given the commission the tors, and others interested in thel
following charge: program.
-Review, and make recommend- At the same time, the committee
ations concerning, the affirmativejis pouring over budgetary records
action program with respect to in an attempt to determine wheth-
minority groups; er, in a time of budgetary crises,
-Inquire into University policies, the college has been a good in-
procedures and practices which vestment.
may contribute to discrimination "We are taking a hard look at
against minority groups; costs and trying to compare them
-Work with the various person- with those of the rest of the Uni-.

(Continued from Page 1)
trol," the President said, "but we
ill not make controls a perma-
nent feature of American life.
When they are no longer needed
we will get rid of them."
As of now, the stabilization
measures will remain in force in- I
definitely:
Because the task of formulating;
specific wage-price-rent guidelines
has been left to the Pay Board and
Price Commission, officials said
ey could not begin to guess the
mount of increases that might be
allowed.
The White House refused to pro-
vide even an approximate guide-
line for permissible wage settle-
nents; an official said the Pay'
Board will have to provide "stand
rds or guidelines" before Phase 2'
begins on Nov. 14.
However, some economists esti-
mate that wage increases of up to'
5 to 6 per cent a year would meet
the President's goal of holding in-1
flation down to 2 or 3 per cent
a year.
The only exception to price curbs
Violations of
rent freeze
10'ound in city

will be raw agricultural products,
which were excluded from the
current freeze,
The existing Cost of Living
Council, headed by Secretary of
Treasury John Connally, will have
authority to veto or revise stand-
ards recommended by the board

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READ
-JAMES WECHSLER-
in
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nel offices at the University; and
-Work with the various aca-
demic departments in recruitment.

and the Price Commission. A major problem Cash sees is
It will have no power to inter- how to move the University's large
vene, however, in individual cases mass of minority group members
-such as review of a specific wage from blue-collar service categories
or price boost-that will come be- to clerical and middle manage-
fore the commisison or the board. ment positions.
China expert analyzes
new U.S. foreigyn policy

versity," Scott says.
Aside from the committee's of-
ficial operations individual mem-
bers have been engaged in their
own investigations. These consist
largely, Scott says, of sitting in
on RC classes, and speaking with
RC students during meals at East!
Quad, home of the college.
The problem most frequently
cited by RC students, Scott said,
is the increasing enrollment of the
college.
As the size increases, and
earlier unifying programs tend to
be cancelled, Scott said, students'
feel the RC "isn't as tight as it
used to be."

Education for Social Change
Planning Meeting
Students, Faculty, and Community Invited
East Quad Room 126-Friday 12-5

PROF. MARVIN FELHEIM
Dept. of English
SPEAKS ON
"RACIAL and RELIGIOUS IMAGES
in the AMERICAN FILM"
following Lox and Bagels brunch
Sunday, Oct. 10, 11:30 AM.

HILLEL

1429 HILL

75c

I

(Continued from Page 1)
mean Peking's self-exclusion from
the U.N., and warned against be-,
lieving this "deceit."
Either Peking is seated and1
Taipei expelled or Taipei remains
and Peking does not enter the
U.N.
Nevertheless, Chinese-American
talks will proceed regardless of
developments in the U.N., in Viet- ,
nam. or inside China, according
to Whiting. High officials in both
countries have a solid commit-
ment to continued discussions andI
the Nixon visit, as evidenced by a'
newly planned Kissingeramission
to Peking despite the apparent
t irmi fho

Whiting,

In the cases of Mao or Chou, The school's structure, Scott;
both men are old and ill who said, hasn't changed with its grow-
could drop from the scene at any ! ing enrollment, and the commit-
time. tee is faced with a choice of mak-
Both men also 'are the only ing basic changes or "doing some-

Chinese leaders publicly commit-
ted to the thaw in U.S.-Chinese
relations, he noted. It is highly
questionable whether their poli-
cies would continue if one or both
of them dropped from the politi-
cal arena.
What will be the outcome of
Nixon talks in Peking? "At a
minimum," stated Whi t in g,
"there'll be a frank discussion of
interests, limited in intent." He

(Continued from Page 1) U Jt . urmoni tn . cited Chou's statement to an
At McKinleyA s s oc i at e s a Whiting enumerated problems American- groupthatdifferences
spokesman says, "We are still with whic hboth countries u need not be settled, they only need
waiting for a final ruling. All our cote ThenUS. Chfnse aty be discussed.
~ntrctsareat he ighr rteswith Nationalist China, a diplo-,
antracts are at the higher rates matic ulcer, has to be phased The U.S. cannot "dispose of
but if there is a ruling against us out; this move will engender dis- Vietnam in Peking," said Whit-
we will give our tenants a credit trust among other nations that ing. Whiting predicts only agree-
towards future rent payments," he have signed treaties with the U.S. ments on travel and cultural ex-I
adds. United States relations with changes and 'a marginal trade be-
Other freeze guidelines which other states could suffer, Whiting tween the two states.F
apply to the rent issue state that: said. A rapproachment. mean-
-Landlords cannot evict tenants while, between the U.S. and
#ho have refused to pay the rent China might chill U.S. relations TG
increases. Any attempt at eviction with the Soviet Union. Lack of
for this reason is in violation of diplomatic tact concerning ean- Delta-Sigma-Delta
the ree'Ze guidelines; diplomatic tact concerning the
-Rent for new units - units announcement of a changed U.S.
which have not been previously policy toward China has severely
rented-can be no higher than the disrupted U.S. - Japanese rela- F RIDAY-Oct. 8, 8-11 p.m.
prevailing rate charged on com- tions. Whiting discounted any po- Live Bond & Refreshments
arable units in the area; litical advantage gained by Nixon 1502 Hill St.
-Damage deposits may not be from the trip if it succeeds and
raised; only negative repercussions if it
-If a tenant's lease should ex- fails.
pire while the freeze is still in As for China, the change has
effect the rent may not be in- put it on the diplomatic defen- the
creased; sive. The announcement caused Fort student body:
-Landlords who reduced rents suspicion in North Vietnam, North
daring the summer and then raised! Korea, Albania and the Chinese
them to the pre-summer level in supported revolutionary move-
September are allowed to continue' ments. .
this practice if they have tax rec- j"Instability in the Chinese hier-
ords proving they have done this archy is another problem cited by by
for at least three years. The freeze Whiting for American and Chi-
guidelines limit the fall rent to no nese leaders. "The longevity of a Levi
lher than the fall rent charged single leader (such as Mao Tse-
iat year; and tung or Chou En-lai) in negotia- Farah
-Tenants of co-op and condo- tions is questionable," commented
miniums' are treated as hom'eown- .'........'7 Wright
ers and the monthly charges they
pay for general maintenance and eSEVENL
other costs are not rent and there- SE E
fore not frozen. If the manager de- tSAMURAI
c es to add services tdoorman,: Male
maid service),, the tenant-owners not only Kurosawa s
must pay the increase. most vital film ...
perhaps the best
Japanese film ever" J K J
STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF aeA
Donald Richie
U. of M. TONIGHT-Nat.S,.
+ 7& Miciga $1.5 MState Street at Liberty
7pMicmhigan.Film Society
ACAPUL.CO _________________s
226Y L 2.25 -'

thing about RC's size."
Whatever changes the commit-
Baroque Ensemble
Informal (onceri
Sunday at 8:00
Telemann-Quantz-Bach
ST. CLARE'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 PACKARD (one light
south of Stad. Blvd. $1.75

The Foremost Symphonic
Military Band in the World
See and Hear
'The President's Own"
United States Marine Band
At Ann Arbor Pioneer High School
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10
Special Matinee 3 :00 p.m.-All seats $1.00
Evening Concert 7:00 p.m.-$2.00 & $3.00
Profits to charities of Ann Arbor Eastern and Western Kiwanis
TICKETS ON SALE AT:
" Ulrich's Bookstore
" Ann Arbor Bank (Packard-Brockman Branch)
" Westgate Standard Service
. Arbor Hills Hardware
" Huron Valley National Bank (West Stadium Branch')
ALSO--Pioneer High School ticket office-Sunday only

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Coffee Pots......... $1.99-up
Radios-AM, FM, Clock ... $3.99-up
Winter Coats ...........$3.99-up

Compare Our Prices for Substantial Savings
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BOX OFFICE OPEN AT 6:30
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SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 5:30 P.M.
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It's a pretty blue
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