100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CINEMAI II
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
GRETA GARBO in
NINOTCHKA
with MELVYN DOUGLAS
directed by Ernst Lubitsch
7 and 9 p.m., AUD. A, ANGELL

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

al4c

2Utr4t l ttn

IBatiy

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, October 7, 1971

NEXT WEEK: Gunga Din and the
Hound of the Baskervilles

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT ONLY-THURS., OCT. 7
AKRAN
dir. RICHARD MYERS
GRAND PRIZE: ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL, 1969
"AKRAN was unquestionably the discovery of the year .
capturing in rapid brilliant flashes the fears, the frustrations, the
hang-ups, the hopes-the emotional texture of young people
today.",
-Arthur Knight, Film Society Review
. May be the single most important event of this year's
Chicago Film Festival . the most influential film since
Godard's early work .,."
-Ebert, Chicago Sun Times
SHOWS AT 7 & 9:30 $1.00
330 Maynard
COMING MON.-Bunvel's The Exterminating Angel
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative

4I
newsbriefs
By The Associated Press
CHARLES "BEBE" REBOZO, a close friend of President
Nixon received favored treatment in the sale of Florida land to
the federal government in 1969, according to Newsday, a Long
Island newspaper.
While other landowners in the area were offered a "take-it-or
leave-it" deal at low prices, Rebozo obtained close-to-appraisal prices
on his holdings, the newspaper said.
The newspaper account quoted A.E.N. Westcott, an Army Corps
of Engineers official who negotiated the acquisition of the property
as explaining "We were supposed to be dealing with someone who
was an intimate of people in high places."
Rebozo was unavailable for comment.
ALASKAN ESKIMOS have laid claim to the entire 76,000-
square-mile North Slope of their state, including 413,000 acres
of oil field already leased to private companies by the state
government for almost $1 billion.
The Arctic Slope Native Association filed suit yesterday with the
U.S. District Court, claiming that the state's selection of North Slope
land under the Alaskan Statehood Act of 1958 be invalidated.
Alaska Gov. William A. Egan said yesterday, "The state feels
there is no question about state ownership of such land."
THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY requested
the Justice Department to file charges against the Ford Motor
Company yesterday charging them with violation of the Clean
Air Act.
The agency charged that Ford shipped to its dealers, autos which
had not received antipollution clearance, a charge carrying with itI
a fine of up to $10,000 for each vehicle shipped illegally.
Ford conceeded it shipped 207,500 uncertified vehicles with Dr(..-

major tax

cut

WASHINGTON UP) -
House yesterday passed a

Without even calling the roll, the
bill to cut business and individual

House

taxes $15.4 billion over the next three years.
It was a victory for President Nixon. Even though the
measure was modified to give individuals more and busi-
ness less than he recommended, it remains a key part of
his new economic program.
It was a defeat for powerful segments of organized la-
bor. Union chiefs had staged a last-minute blitz against the
measure, contending it is still a bonanza for business.

passes

'

Egyptian charges,
Egyptian Foreign Minister Mahmoud Riad, speaking at the United
Nations yesterday accused Israel of seeking an interim agree-
ment to reopen the Suez Canal as a "springboard for further
aggression." Riad further called for an immediate Israeli com-
mitment to withdraw from all Egyptian territory.
RIGGING' CHARGED:
S. Viet court -aske
to overturn election

All individual taxpayers would
benefit at least a little under the
measure.
Those at the poverty level and
for some distance above it would
receive significant tax cuts. Au-
tomobile buyers would save an
average of $200 on new cars pur-
chased.
Business would get a tax sub-
sidy on new equipment purchased.
This incentive to stimulate or-
ders and employment and to
make U.S. plants more competi-
tive is a major administration ob-
j ective.
Hoping to speed the measure
to enactment by early Novem-
ber, the Senate Finance Commit-
tee opens hearings, today. How-
ever, strenuous efforts to reshape
the tax relief are expected on
the Senate floor.
According to over-all estimates,
individual incomes taxes would be
Scut by about $27billion this year,
$5 billion in 1972 and $2.7 billion
in 1973.
By next year, individuals with
no more than $2,050 income or
families of four with no more
than $4,300 would have no income
tax to pay.
A typical individual earning
$3,500 would save $24 on this
year's tax, $59 on next year's, $51
on 1973 earnings. If he earned
$15,000, his savings would be $7
this year, $13 next year, none
thereafter.

M A T/'V l17T I r1l h__ __ _ _ n 1ti. " e . . ....

4' II - - -

AT LAST IT'S HERE
Open 12:45 Daily!
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

cautions to prevent their sale until they were cleared but said
they had oral but not written permision from the EPA to do so.
SOVIET JEWS have been told in a statement from the
Communist Party Central Committee that there is little hope
for allowing their mass emigration to Israel.
Albert Ivanov, head of the Committee, told a delegation of Jews
Sept. 20 that "the preservation of the interest of the state and the
so-called brain drain will be taken into consideration" in deciding
on individuals who will be allowed to go.

SAIGON (A1) - Opponents of President Nguyen Van Thieu
asked the Supreme Court yesterday to overturn results of
Sunday's election that election officials claimed gave the
unopposed president an overwhelming vote,
The petition to the court came only hours after Vice
President Nguyen Cao Ky assailed the election as "brazenly
rigged" by Thieu.
The petition was filed by Trinh Quoc Khanh, chairman
of the Committee Against Dictatorship, labor leader Nguyen
Ngoc Loi, and two Saigon city councilmen, Duong Van Long

At State & Liberty
DIAL 662-6264

U

Senate votes
govt. pay hike
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Sen-
ate, by a 60-27 vote, took a first
step yesterday to upset President
Nixon's effort to keep the lid on
federal pay scales as part of his
anti-inflationary program.
It adopted an amendment to a
military procruement bill under
which government employes could
get a pay raise on Jan. 1 of as
much as permitted private em-
ployes after the wage-price freeze
expires on Nov. 13.
Nixon ordered that a scheduled
Jan. 1 pay raise of about 6 per
cent for government employes un-
der legislation passed last year
be postponed for six months.
Senators trying to overturn
Nixon's order hailed the adop-
tion of the amendment as a sign
that the Senate will approve to-
morrow a resolution of disapprov-
al of Nixon's order.
"It looks pretty good now,"
Sen. Frank E. Moss, D-Utah, told
reporters after the vote.
The House upheld the Presi-
dent on Monday, defeating a re-
solution disapproving the order.
A similar resolution was ap-
proved by the Senate Post Office
and Civil Service Committee ear-
lier yesterday and is scheduled
for a floor vote tomorrow.
The amendment proposing fed-
eral raises equal to those in pri-
vate industry was coupled to the
disapproval resolution approved
by the Senate committee
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

THE CRITICS
AGREE:
"BRILLIANT"
-Newsday
" SHOCKING"
-Unger, Ingenue
"IMPORTANT"
-Show
"The polarization of
American society is
stated brilliantly!"
-Paul D. Zimmerman,
-Newsweek
starring
WILLIAM TEPPER
KAREN BLACK

COLUMBIA PICTURES
Presents
A BBS PRODUCTION
HE MID
A Film by
JACK NICHOLSON

Senate approves weapons bill,
asks withdrawal from Vietnam

and Ha The Ruyet.
It challenged the legality of the
election's organization by the In-
terior Ministry, the voters' lack
of choice, and the way in whichI
votes were tabulated and the final
results determined.
The court must rule on the

WASHINGTON (R') - The
Senate gave overwhelming ap-
proval yesterday to a bill au-
thorizing $21 billion for mili-
tary weapons and research
while asking for total U.S.
withdrawal from Indochina
within six months.
Passage of the annual mili-
tary arms bill by an 82-4 vote
came after the Senate blocked
an effort to force a new presi-
dential election in South Viet-
nam and set the stage for an
effort to override President
Nixon's delay of a federal pay
raise.
The arms bill, already pass-
ed by the House in a slightly
different form, goes back to that
body before going to confer-
ence for resolution of the dif-
ferences.
The nay votes were cast by
four Democratic senators, Wil-

liam Fulbright, Ark., Mike
Mansfield, Montana, Gaylord
Nelson, Wisconsin, and Mike
Gravel, Alaska.
The bill had been under de-
bate for less than three weeks,
the shortest time the arms
measure has taken to pass the
Senate since before Pentagon
critics began mobilizing against
it in 1969. The $21 billion figure
is only $1 billion under Nixon's
request.
By a vote of 60 to 25, the
Senate rejected the amendment
by Sen. Joseph Montoya, (D-
N.M.), to shorten the six-month
deadline for U. S. withdrawal
voted earlier if South Vietna-
mese President Nguyen Van
Thieu fails to call a new election
by Feb. 3.
Montaya accused the United
States of partial responsibility
for Thieu's uncontested reelec-

tion last Sunday, asserting that
"In the name of political ex-
pediency. America has openly
assisted South Vietnam's Presi-
dent, Thieu in stifling democ-
racy."
Then, on a 44-38 tally, it
rejected Fullbrigbt's move to
block a provision in the bill that
would break the United Na-
tions embalgoon trade with
Rhodesia and permit U.S. im-
ports of strategically important
chrome ore.
Once more, the military pro-
curement measure, which au-
thorizes projects for which ac-
tual money will be voted in a
later appropriations bill, sur-
vived the Senate with all ma-
jor weapons systems getting
authorizations approved by the
usually pro-Pentagon Armed
Services Committee.

validity of the election and the d
returns by Oct. 26. E 0 E( t t
In other developments, Vener-
able Huyen Quang, secretary- 9
general of the An Quang Buddhist ,P ase T o
Church, said he would send a
letter to U.S. ambassador Ells- WASHINGTON (P) - President
worth Bunker denouncing alleged Nixon will outline the details of
American intervention in the elec- his Phase 2 economic program
tion "against the will of the in a live radio-television broad-
South Vietnamese people." cast at 7:30 p.m. EDT tonight.

i

He cited the fact that tear gas,
weapons and helicopters used to
break up Buddhist demonstrations
and to attack Buddhist pagodas
were furnished to South Vietna-
mese police by the United States.
The U.S. Embassy acknowled-
ged Buddhist charges that an
American police adviser accom-
panied South Vietnamese riot po-
lice who quelled bloody street
riots in Da Nang on election day.
It said the U.S. consulate in Da
Nang was "keeping in touch"
with Buddhist leaders.

Nixon thus will beat by more
than a week the mid-October
deadline be set some time ago'
for laying out the program t h a t
will replace the current 90-day
wage-price-rent freeze.
The major question expected to
be answered in Nixon's speech is
how much if any will wages and
prices be allowed to rise following
the end of the current freeze Nov.
13.

WATCH FOR
THEI
OMEGA MAN!
4 -

SEATS NOW!
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE, 10-1, 2-5

r9tro$44ioIt/ £Jeai-re Moya

I

L

THE GALA INAUGURAL PRODUCTION I

NOW SHOWING
.
ON WASHTENAW AVE.
11/2 MILES EAST OF
ARBORLAND-U.S. 23
DIAL 434-1782
MGM'S
FABULOUS
THREE
AT 6:30 &9 P.M
SAT. & SUN.
AT 1:30-4-6:30-9 P.M.
the ultimate trip
O A SPACE
ODYSSEY 1

THE ALLEY CINEMA
SATURDAY, SUNDAY, Oct. 9, 10
DR. ROSS and LIGHTNIN' SLIM
2 SHOWS NIGHTLY - 7:30, 10:00 $2,25
COMING-Oct. 15, 16, 17 ALBERT KING
Oct. 22, 23, 24 JIMMY REED
Advance Tickets-Salvation Records
330 Maynard and 1103 S. University

THE FIFTH HORSEMAN IS FEAR
(Czech, 1966)
FRIDAY, OCT..8
7:00, 9:30, 11:30 p.m.
Alice's Restaurant
ALICE LLOYD HALL
FREE COFFEE
75c

F

m

-0

POWER CENTER

A,6 Xe /ex/r'min y eA14

I

I

WORLD PREMIERE

1

i
II

I

BARBARA
COOK
RUTH FORD
WESLEY ADDY

CELESTE
HOLM
its

CAROL
BRICE

BLOW-UP
BLOW-U
DIRECTED BY MICH
" DAVID HEMMINGS

P

BLOW-UP

0o

MAX SHOWALTER
RUSS THACKER

ELANGELO ANTONIONI. MUSIC BY HERBIE HANCOCK

"THE GRASS HARP"

* VANESSA REDGRAVE

" SARAH MILES

" Best Picture of the Year * Best Director
-National Society of Film Critics
0 " . the sharpest cinema of the year."-Bosley Crowther
N.Y. Time=_
" "Antonioni revolutionized the art of color film with BLOW-UP
.Until BLOW-UP no filmmaker had successfully used color to
deal with real people in real situations on a contemporary basis."
-Lee R. Bobker, ELEMENTS OF FILM

"Why is it that the impact of our best films has been limited to
the summation a prevailing mood as opposed to the ability of
works in other media (i.e. the record album Highway 61 Revisit-
ed) to, literally, change people's lives?"-William Bayer, Break-
ing Through, Selling Out, Dropping Dead and Other Notes on
Filmmaking. "BLOW-UP," though not an American film, of which
Bayer is writing, has this ability to change peoples lives. It
changed mine."-D.M.

I

STARTS WED., OCT. 13th

Book & Lyrics by KENWARD ELMSLIE
Music by CLAIBE RICHARDSON

a WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDS!

I

NOTE: The Clarity of the Photography, the Brilliance of Color, and the Subtleties on the Sound Track Are Not Adequately Evident in the 16-
mm Prints We Have Played in the Past. For that Reason, We Have Especially Arranged for an Original-Format 35-mm Print for This Per-

I

I

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan