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October 06, 1971 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-06

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 6, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 6, 197

Film
(Continued from Page 1)
tisements in West Quad, South
Quad and the Michigan Union
were marked "cancelled".
In April, a second member of
the Orson Welles Film Society-
Ed Crossmore, a law student -
became involved in an entangle-
ment with organizers of the Peo-
ple's Peace Treaty conference in
February.
The Peace Treaty group had
scheduled a benefit showing of
"They Shoot Horses, Don't
They?"
Crossmore told The Daily that
he called the only non-theatrical
distributor of the film, Films
Inc., to protest the peace confer-
ence showing. Orson Welles had
booked the film for August and
Crossmore objected to the con-
flicting presentations.
The night before thescheduled
showing, a group active in the
Peace Treaty promotion received
an anonymous warning by phone
that "Horses" would not be allow-
ed to be shown.
The afternoon of the showing
bore out the caller's threat as all

groups
four doors leading into Natural
Science Aud. were found bolted
and chained from the inside.
Peace Treaty representatives
managed to open the doors short-
ly before showtime. Ironically, the
film had been sent to Philadel-
phia by mistake and was never
shown.
It remains unclear whether
there is any connection between
the phone calls asking distribu-
tors to cancel the films and the
strange physical acts that hin-
dered the showings.
But because of Orson Welles'
opposition to the film showings,
members of ARM and Student
Government Council investigators
have naturally speculated on whe-
ther Orson Welles, Maurello and
Crossmore might have had any-
thing to do with the incidents.
Both Maurello and Crossmore,
however, have refused repeatedly
to comment on any of the allega-
tions brought against them.
Although Maurello resigned the
presidency of Orson Welles im-
mediately following the "Horses"

relations

marked

by

controversy

incident, a number of incidents in
his past, including two arrests for
illegal activity involving films,
have made him a focus of atten-
tion.
While an undergraduate at Cor-
nell University, Maurello was
charged with grand larceny on
two occasions and acquitted.
In the first trial, Maurello was
alleged to have picked up a film
intended for someone else at a
local post office.
The trial records shows that a
Post Office official made posi-
tive identification of Maurello.
He was acquitted, however, when
he provided an uncorroborated
alibi and character witnesses.
In the second trial, Maurello
was indicted on four counts of
grand larceny. Three of the
counts charged him with order-
ing films from three distributors
under false names.
The case differed from the
first - film distributors knew
that films were being ordered un-
der false names. In fact, they
called the alleged recipients and

Research plan faces obstacles

received confirmation that none
had been ordered.
In order to discover who had
falsely identified himself, the dis-
tributors sent the films ahead.
Since the distributors had prior
knowledge that the people under
whose names the films had been
ordered did not actually want
them, the judge ruled Maurello
could not be charged with a crime
for picking them up.
The fourth charge was dropped
by agreement of the prosecuting
attorney.
Citing this history of Maurel-
o's, Frank Pedi of Films Inc. has
said that Films Inc. would not
have done business with Orson
Welles if it had been aware of
Maurello's connection with the
organization.
In August, the controversy be-
tween Orson Welles and ARM
came to a head when both groups
scheduled overlapping showings
of "They Shoot Horses, Don't
They?"
ARM scheduled their showing
when they discovered Films Inc.,
the non-theatrical distributor for
the film, had cancelled operations
with Orson Welles at some point
earlier in the summer.
Orson Welles, however, had
booked a theatrical print from the
film's producer and thusavoided
losing the right to show the film.
The misunderstanding led to an
is petitioning new mem-
bers. Those who have ex-
perience in advertising
or business managing
should be sure to sign at
the Cinema Guild ticket
desk this week.

angry one-week advertising war in
The Daily. ARM placed an adver-
tisement for their own showing
which claimed that Orson Welles
had cancelled.
The next day Orson Welles re-
torted with an angry accusation
of "blatant competition" and as-
serted that plans to show the
film were still on.
The rest of the week featured
advertisements for the two show-
ings in each morning's paper.
In addition, ARM leafletted the
Orson Welles showings, charging
them with harassment and with
being the force behind DIS-
ARM.
Both groups ended by showing
the film.
At this time, George de Pugh,
a spokesman for ARM, alleges
that he was confronted by retired
president Maurello on central
campus.
DePugh says that Maurello
threatened to get rid of ARM if
the Orson Welles Film Society
was damaged by SGC or CSJ in-
vestigations.
Regardless of this and other
charges, Maurello and Crossmore

have continually declined to con-
firm or deny any of the incidents
alleged to have occurred through-
out the controversy.
Crossmore resigned suddenly
last week from Orson Welles and
the new president denies know-
ledge of the past activities of ei-
ther Maurello or Crossmore.
Maurello, meanwhile, says he
has been advised by his lawyer to
remain silent, in the light of a re-
cent arrest on charge of possess-
ing some $2,000 of stolen Uni-
versity f i 1i m equipment. He
faces a preliminary hearing on
those charges this afternoon in
civil court.
Charges and denials, argu-
ments over scheduling, advertis-
ing battles, continued harassment
-all of these have cropped up
during the last nine months of
film-showing on campus.
DIAL 5-6290
ENDING WEDNESDAY
The story
of a married
man..with a
hobby.

Tomorrow night's hearing be-
fore CSJ, to which both Maurello
and Crossmore have been called
to testify, should shed light on
some of the controversy's mud-
dled events.
In fact, Director of Student
Organizations Gutman, as he
brings the charges before CSJ,
says he is convinced that campus
film societies have been involved
in "undesirable" activities more
serious than the ones listed in his
complaint.
If he proves correct, perhops
the present charges represent
merely the tip of an iceberg, the
entire body of which could soon
float imposingly to the surface.
Dial 662-6264
i At State & Liberty
w
radingagarn...
AT 1, 3, 5,7, 9 P M.
ENDS TODAY OPEN 12:45
STARTS THURSDAY

2 DAYS
B.B.DKING
HOWLIN WOLF
FRI.-HILL AUD.-9 P.M.
$2.50-$3.50-$4.50
Tickets: Mich. Union
Salvation Records, 330 Maynard
*.
$15

11

(Continued from Page 1)
Committee on University Affairs
(SACUA) - Assembly's executive
body-and the topic of classified
research was touched upon.
According to Prof. Warren Nor-
man, SACUA chairman, SACUA
members explained to Fleming the
thrust of the faculty proposal and
Fleming "expressed a deep con-
cern" for the employes of the Uni-
versity's Willow Run Laboratories
-where the vast majority of the
campus' classified projects are
performed.
Fleming said last night that his
decision on the matter would not
be made for at least 2-3 weeks,
adding that he wants to see the
final draft of Assembly's proposal
before he makes a committment.
That final draft is scheduled to
be approved by Assembly Oct. 18.
Other top administrators also

declined comment on the contro-
versial proposal, but apparently
budgetary concerns-perhaps the
greatest problem facing the Uni-
versity this year-will not be a
consideration in their decision.
Wilbur Pierpont, vice president
and chief financial officer, said
last night that the University's
research labs are essentially self
supporting and do not have an
effect on the University's overall
financial position.
"Their research is financed by
gifts and grants," he said. "This
is certainly not a question of fi-
nancial impact."
-The Willow Run facilities do
receive some funds from the Uni-
versity, Pierpont added. Last year
the laboratories received $352,800,
a figure that will not increase this
year.
In recent years, the Regents,

while often ignoring student de-
mands, have been at times very
receptive to suggestions of As-
sembly.
Examples of this attitude in-
clude proposals for establishing a
student controlled bookstore (Oct.
1969) ; altering the status of the
University's Reserve Officer Train-
ing Corps (ROTC) program (Dec.
1969); and seeking increased mi-
nority student enrollment (April
1970)-all of which were approved
by the Regents only after Assem-
bly added its weight behind stu-
dent forces.
The Regents, meanwhile, say
they are largely uninformed on
the extent of Assembly's proposal
and hope to increase their infor-
mation.
Regent Robert Nederlander (D-
Birmingham) said he feels "the
University shouldn't be in the
warmaker's business," b u t ex-
pressed fears that projects with
peacetime uses might be excluded
under the new policy.
"iI'd like to get a lot of input
from all sections of the University
before I make my decision," he
added.
Regent Gertrude Huebner (D-
Bloomfield Hills) asserted that
"if abolishing most classified re-
search makes no difference finan-
cially to the University then I
would support the proposal. I cer-
tainly approve of it philosophic-
ally," she said.
H u e b n e r indicated, however.
that she has many unanswered
questions about the pr o po a,
which she hopes to resolve before
the November meeting.

DIAL 8-6416
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HE ID
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JACK NICHOLSON

KATE

McGARRIGLE

AND

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The Marriage
of aYoung
Stockbroker
FRI.-McCabe and Mrs. Miller

"A
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-Ingenue

DAWSON

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6
Day Calendar
Psychiatry Lecture: Lenin Baler,
"Relevance of Public Health to Mental
Health," Public Health Aud., 10 am.
Anatomy Lecture: Bruce Carlson,
"The Regeneration of Muscles," 4804
Med. Sci. II, 1:10 pm.
LSA Coffee Hour: Dean's Confer-
ence Room, 2549 LSA, 3-4:30 pm.; free
coffee, cookies, and conversation.
Speech Dept. Performance : "Mother-
love," and "The Man in the Bowler
Hat", Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10
pm.
Hayward Keniston Lecture in the
Humanities: Irving Leonard, "The Ed-
ucation of a Great South American,"
Rackham Amph., 4:10 pm.
Botany. Seminar: Klaus Raschke,
MSU, "Transport of Potassium and
Chloride and its Relation to Stomatal
Function in Plants," 1139 Nat. Sci.
Bldg., 4 pm.
Statistics Seminar: Norman Starr,
"How To Win A War If You Must,"
2440 Mason Hall, 4 pm.
Physics Colloquium: J. G. Asbury,
Argonne Nat'l Lab, "Mass-Energy Bal-
ance in Lake Michigan," 4 pm.
Women in Comrunications: Meeting.
of Theta Sigma Phi, 425 Hill No. 301,
7 pm.
Introductory Computing Lectures: E.
J. Fronczak, "The FORTRAN IV PRO-
GRAMMING Language," Nat. Sci. Aud.,
7:30 pm.
Professional Theatre Program: "The
Grass Harp," Power Center, 8 pm..
General Notices
CORRECTION: Prog. in Comparative
Lit. & Centr. for Coord. of Ancient &
Mod. Studies will hold a lecture by
Mary Lefkowitz, "Classical Mythology
and the Role 'of Women in Modern
Literature" in Aud. B, Angell Hall on
Thurs., Oct. 7 at 4 pm., and NOT TO-
DAY (Wed.) as previously recorded.
Assoc. for Children with Social and
2 DAYS
B.B. KING
HOWLIN WOLF
FRI.-HILL AUD.-9 P.M.
$2.50-$3.50-$4.50
Tickets: Mich. Union
Salvation Records, 330 Maynard

Learning Difficulties: Gen'l Meeting,
Zion Lutheran Ch., 1501 W. Liberty,
Thurs., Oct. 7, 8 pm.; for more info call
ACSLD Serv. Ctr. 761-8182, 9 am.-Noon,
or M. Diamond, 663-1035.
Placement Service
FEDERAL SERVICE ENTRANCE EX-
AM (FSEE) will be given Sat. morning,
Oct. 16; exam open to graduating srs.
and masters in non-technical fields, for
positions with federal government any-
place in country. Applications have
just been received, and should be filed
immediately for 10/16 exam. Exam is
given each month on third Saturday.
NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY ex-
ams will be given Oct. 23 and Dec. 4;
applications available, must be filed
by 10/13 for first exam; positions all in
Washington, D.C.
Female try-outs for
GODDARD HOUSE
PLAYERS
Call:
MICHAEL SAMMUTT
764-7920
For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits ... . $6.98
(All Colors)
Bells .......$8.50
DENIM
Bush Jeans . $10.00
Bells ........$8.00
Boot Jeans $7.50
Pre-Shrunk . $7.50
Super Slims . $7.00
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

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N.Y. Times

"one of the
finest, most
compelling singers
you will ever
have a chance
to hear."

David Bromberg

THURS.-
Mike Smith

TONIGHT ONLY
VARIETY
Dir. E. A. DUPONT, 1926
Starring E M I L NAN-
NINGS in a circus tale
of jealousy on the high
wire.

Societ k

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Wed. HOOT

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ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7:00 and 9:05 P.M.
S0
NOTICE: THE
CINEMA GUILD
BOARD PRESENTS
TONIGHT'S FILM
FREE OF CHARGE

Seven Samura~i
"the magnificent seven"
A peasant village hires seven masterless samurai to
lead their defense against bandits.
"It is not only Akira Kurosawa's most vital film,
it is also perhaps the best Japanese film ever made."
-Donald Richie
FRIDAY and SATURDAY

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Residential College Auditorium - E. University near Hill
Friday, October 8th, 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

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Oct. 8-9

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ARM/Michigan Film Society

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-THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL- I

11

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