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October 06, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page ,Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October K, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 6, 1971

Petitioning is now open for
10 LSA seats on the
LSA
JOINT STUDENT-FACULTY
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
SIGN-UP FOR INTERVIEWS
TUES.-FRI. 4-5 P.M.
ROOM 3M, MICHIGAN UNION

IL

a

FOREST
FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES
I "I
- - - - - - ------

c

The strength of Michigan's
number two ranked Wolverines
began to show this 'week as the
Maize and Blue cracked into the
top ten nationally in five differ-
ent team categories.
Michigan moved into the num-
ber one spot in defense against
scoring, allowing only six points
or an average of 1.5 per game. The
defensive unit vaulted into second
place in both total defense and
defending against the run with
159.8 and 56.8 yard averages,
respectively.
Miami of Ohio is first in total
defense at 135.0 yards, - while
Kansas State is first in rushing
defense at 56.3 - just two yards
total better than Michigan.
Incidentally, the . Wolverines
have yet to yield a touchdown via
the ground, to lead another cate-
gory.
Spearheading the defensive
charge is All-America linebacking
hopeful Mike Taylor. Taylor has
amassed 35 solo tackles, seven asp

-IN
te, ns, e

top s
By ROGER ROSSITER

the n
sists, one interception and one
recovered fumble. Right b e h i n d
Taylor is linebacking mate Tom
Kee with 20 solos 15 assists, one
interception, and three passes
broken up. Tackle Tom Beckman
has 19 solos, 10 assists, and four
tackles for losses.
Only Sonny Sixkiller and h i s
aerial machine at the University
of Washington has scored more
frequently than the Wolverines.:
The Huskies have scored at a
49.8 points per game clip, while
the Wolverines have attacked the
scoreboards at a rate of 40.3,
ranking them second in scoring.
offense.
Michigan's defense didn't steal
the whole show, though. T he'
ground game led by Billy Taylor
raced into the tenth spot nation-
ally in rushing offense.
Taylor is the Wolverines' in-
dividual leader with 361 yards in
79 cracks for a 4.6-yard average
and four touchdowns. Sophomore
sensation Ed Shuttlesworth is se-
cond with 235 yards and a 4.8-4
yard average.

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

Army saves face in
battle of Missouri'

aton.
Michigan's passing game has not
been spectacular, although every-
one who has thrown the ball has
looked impressive. Kevin Casey,
having done the majority of the
signal calling, leads the team in
attempts (30), completions (13), 4
and yardage (155). Both Casey
and Larry Cipa have thrown for
one touchdown.
The majority of the pass catch-
ing has been done by Bo Rather
and Glenn Doughty, who have
each caught seyen passes, Rath-
er's good for 104 yards ands
Doughty's 84.
Michigan also has two unsung
heroes who are literally kicking
their way into national promi-
nence : place kicker Dana C o in
and punter Barry Dotzauer.
Coin has converted 21 of 21
extra point attempts and two of
four field goals to make him the
Wolverines' leading scorer and the
twelfth ranked kick-scorer in the
nation. He has also added 11 solo
and eight assisted tackles as a re-
serve linebacker.
Dotzauer's 21 punts for an aver-
age of 41.6 yards a kick booted
him up to the ,nation's fifteenth
spot in that category.
Wolverine. fans have one sta-
tistic that they are all watching
intently, that being Billy Tay-
lor's attempt to surpass Ron John-
son's career rushing record of
2440 yards. Taylor needs o n 1
304 more yards in the Wolverines"
final seven games to establish a
new Michigan record. Should Tay-
lor continue to ramble at his pre-
sent rate, he should bypass John-
son on homecoming against In-
diana on October 30th.
Knicks clip*
Cavs trip
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York
Knickerbockers, fired by a 16-point
performance of rookie guard Dean
Meminger, crushed the Atlanta
Hawks 112-91 in a National Basket-
ball Association preseason game
last night.
WOOSTER, Ohio-Bob Kauffman
hit a basket and two free throws
and Walt Hazzard tossed in two
more foul shots to break an 89-89
tie with 3:20 left and lift Buffalo
to a 97-94 victory over the Cleve-
land Cavaliers in a National Bas-
ketball Association exhibition gam4
yesterday.
Rookie guard Charile Davis
scored 15 points for the Cavaliers.

615 t1.0.aw As
662 5903

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Lee
SMale
CH Seate
StateStre aLiet

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
WOLVER4NE D E F E N D E R S
Mike Keller (90) and Randy
Loagan (41) put it to Navy's
Dan Howard, while middle line-
backer and All-American candi-
date Mike Taylor (33) dives in
for a piece of the action. Michi-
gan's 46-0 win left them first in
the nation in defense, allowing
just 1.5 points per game.
2 DAYS
Bs.B. KING
HOWLI N WOLF
FRI.-HILL AUD.-9 P.M.
$2.50-$3.50-$4.50
Tickets: Mich. Union
Salvation Records, 330 Maynard
Subscribe to
j The Michigan Daily

By DAN BORUS
The regiment regrouped I a s t
Saturday afternoon at West Point,
New York and upset Missouri with
a great show of mortar power, 22-
6. The Army, long on the losing
end of football wars, overcame
a halftime deficit and tamed a
team of paper tigers from the Big
Eight.
The victory marked the second
week in succession that an under-
dog Cadet team upset a favored
rival. On September 25, the Aca-
demy beat Georgia Tech, a team,
that had shut out Michigan State.
The Cadets, a team that won
only one game last year and hac
been tabbed for a similarly dismal
season this year, dominated t h e
game from the second half.
The first half of the contest
was plagued by dull football, with
no sustained advances by either
club. Twice Army punted on third
down.
The lone Missouri score came on
a 54-yard gallop by quarterback
Chuck Roper on a third down play.
It was the only real excitement of
the half.
After Missouri took a 6-3 lead
into the dressing room at t h e
halftime, Army chief of staff, Tom
Cahill removed Dick Atha in fav-
or of a quarterback with a name
more symbollic of a typical Army
field general, King Fink.
If branded with such a name
you have to produce. And pro-
duce he did.
Fink, armed with the spirit of
today's New Action Army, im-
mediately went out to search and
destroy. As soon as the second
half started, the Army called upon
their aerial armaments.
The Cadets came back strong
with two touchdowns through the'
air in the third quarter, taking a
16-6 lead.
Missouri, on the other hand,
was faced with an aroused Army
defense. The famous Missouri off-
tackle plays, the bread and butter
strength of the team under
coach Dan Devine, went almost
nowhere as Army tacklers attack-
ed the Missouri offensive unit as
if it was a defenseless hamlet.
Missouri backs were jarred heav-
ily, losing the football on f i v e
fumbles.
The Army Air defense was just
as polished a fighting unit as

those in the front line trenches,
intercepting Quarterback R o p e r
twice. One of the interceptions
the Army accomplished was in its
own end zone at the end of the
only sustained Missouri drive of
the second half.
But despite the good perform-
ance of the defense, the hero oi
the Battle of the Hudson last
Saturday was Fink. Calm and col-
lected, the sophomore from Flor,
ida riddled the defense that was
once the pride of the Big Eight, a
defense that held high scoring
Stanford to 19 points.
When the air strikes were com-
pleted and the ruins were evaluat-
ed, Fink completed six of thirteen
aerials; three bombs went f o r
touchdowns. Flanker Ed Francis
hauled in two additional tosses
which went for 47 yards.
The surprise was the complete
domination of the Tigers by the
Cadets, thoroughly enjoyed by at
record 43,000 spectators. Rumor
has it that the spoils of victory
could be heard well into Sunday
morning on 'the streets of Wes#
Point, New York, as the A r m y
showed that they were still not
quite the second rate power their
commander in chief feared.

In the old days,
they smacked us across
the knuckles
if we read with our hands.

DANIEL'S JEWELRY CO.
AUTHORIZED KEEPSAKE
JEWELER N ANN ARBOR
201 S. MAIN Mon. & Fri. 'til 8:25
.4y ..
'4.
When you know it's for keeps
Happily, all your special moments together will
be symbolized forever by your engagement and
wedding rings. If the name, Keepsake, is in the
ring and on the tag, you are assured of fine quality
and lasting satisfaction. The engagement diamond
is perfect, of superb color, and precise cut. Your
Keepsake Jeweler has a selection of many lovely
styles. ie's in the yellow pages under "Jewelers."
REGISTERED DIAMOND RINGS

Bicycle afeccionados - tradi-
tional or lately infected - it's
time to get out Three-in-One
oil and start training camp. The
U-M Intramural Sports depart-
ment is announcing the first
"Wolverine 250", a 25-mile bi-
cycle race for teams.
You really don't need that
28-speed Italian racer to enter.
Any student, faculty or staff
member, on any kind of two-
wheeled (non - motorized) ma-
chine is eligible to go at it
Oct. 24 on the Ferry Field as-
phalt track.
A "LeMans", or running
start, and individual team pit
areas are the quasi - Olympian
features of the competition in
three divisions.
Teams of women (4 per

team), men (4 per team) or
co-ed teams (two men and two
women per team) will compete.
The only stipulation is that
each rider must peddle at least
five of the 25 miles (100 laps).
If entry or more than 12
teams per division necessitates
time trials, the four-mile trials
will be held Sunday, Oct. 17,
one week before the race.
Whether you are anticipating
a checkered flag dropped on
your team or just want some
competitive - type exercise,
contact the Intramural office
before Oct. 12 and enter your
team. For further information
or entry forms, contact the IM.
office in the Sports Building or
call (663-4181).

WOLVERINE 250:
Cyclists getting ready

Today, reading with your hand is
quite acceptable.
In fact, it's somewhat of a status
symbol, because people who read with
their hands are graduates of the Evelyn
Wood Course.
The hand, however, hasn't always
been the symbol of rapid reading. The
old method of teaching students to in-
crease their reading speed was to equip
them with a reading machine.
The theory was that a motorized
arm on the machine would extend out
over the page. The arm would move
down the page at a steady speed. Hope-
fully, your eyes would go along for the
ride.
The machine, while seemingly a
good idea, didn't live up to its expecta-
tions. It couldn't slow down when the
reader ran into a confusing passage.
And it was too awkward to use in easy
chairs or beds.
In 1945, Evelyn Wood discovered
the hand as a device for reading faster.
Her reason for using the hand as a
tool was to "give my students the ability
to read groups of words at a time and

to increase their concentration so they
won't have to go back and re-read so
often."
Her principle worked.
Since 1959, 450,000 people have
taken the Evelyn Wood Course and have
increased their reading speed by an
average of 4.7 times.
Using the hand to read faster is a
very interesting experience.
If you would like to try your hand
at it, why don't you come to a Mini-
LessonTM? In one hour's time, we'll have
you reading down the page faster than
you can imagine.
In fact, you'll actually take home
with you a definitely faster reading
speed that can be used on newspapers,
magazines, correspondence, textbooks,
and technical journals.
We'll tell you about some of the
other things that have made this the
most popular extra-curricular course in
the world. We'll also show you how we
improve memories, and how we make
chapter outlining an obsolete study
technique.
It's a wild hour. And it's free.

SKI

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SALE

NOW IN OUR
DOWNSTAIRS FASHION SHOP
$45 SKI PANTS NOW 2.
Supply Limited-First Come, First Serve

1t

Store hours:
Mon.-Fri.
12 noon-8 p.m.
Sat.
10 a.m.-6 p.m.

2455 S. STATE ST.

Master Charge
BankAmericord

t:

-----rn

==

-iii

Increase your reading speed up to 50% at a F R E E SPEED READING
LESSON--plan to attend at 6:30 or 8:30 p.m. each day, each location

North Campus Commons
2101 N. Campus Drive

Michigan League
125 S. Ingalls

ro

NEC=
I
Naww
F

Contemporary Directions
presents
"Music For Instruments I"
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1971
8:00 P.M.-Rackham Lecture Hall
SOPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITHOUT CHARGE

Rings from $100 to $10000 Trade Mark Reg--A-i-PondCo
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iii

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