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October 03, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Speak of me as I am. Nothing extenuate,
Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you speak
Of one that loved not wisely, but too well...
OLIVIER is OT HELLO
THE GREATEST SHAKESPEARE EVER PUT ON FILM,
BY THE GREATEST ACTOR OF OUR TIME.

C14 r

S"ixi*tian

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sunday, October 3, 1971

Attica 's wrong story.

Who's to blame?

SUNDAY
AUD. A, ANGELL

ONE
DAY
ONLY

at 1-4-7-10 pm

sponsored by orson welles film society

ATTICA, N.Y. (A) - This is the story
behind the story of Attica.
In the wake of the prison uprising in
which 42 men died, the press coverage
of the events at Attica state prison has
generated a controversy of its own.
It is focused chiefly on the press'
role in distributing reports that Monday
afternoon rebellious inmates had slash-
ed the throats of hostages who died.
The reports were later described by
medical authorities as false and some
critics charged the press was too ready
to accept as fact the word of the of-
ficials..
Some facts of Monday morning, Sept.
9 the day of the raid are well known
by now. Roughly 1,000 armed peace
officers moved against 1,200 convicts

who held 38 hostages in their D Block
exercise yard.
As a result, 42 persons are dead--
10 prison employes and 32 convicts.
Gerald Houlihan, public information
officer for the state Correction Depart-
ment, and other state officials set up
headquarters inside the prison. Re-
porters at the scene recall that Houli-
han came out every two or three hours
to read official statements and answer
some of newsmen's questions.
It was at one of these sessions, an
hour and half after the police raid
broke the rebellion in its fourth day.
that the report of throat slashing was
'heard for the first time from the lips
of a state official.
As dawn broke, reporters outside the
prison - numbering between 100 and

150 --- told each other that an attempt
by the authorities to break the revolt
was inevitable.
As they waited for further official
word, hundreds of day shift state police,
heavily armed and carrying gas masks,
entered the prison to join the night
shift. Two helicopters on the lawn out-
side the prison were started up.
One helipcopter circled above the
prison once, and suddenly swung back
across the walls at low level, dumping
canisters of tear gas into the yard be-
low.
Immediately, gunfire rattled and
boomed inside and from atop the gray
walls, accompanied by screams and
shouts. The tear gas drifted over the
wall, gagging reporters and relatives of
prison employes who had massed there.
Shouts and calls for assistance crack-

led loudly from radios in parked police
cruisers.
About one and a half hours after the
assault had been launched-roughly
1:15 a.m. - Houlihan appeared at the
gate to make the first official statement
on hostage deaths. He reported that 37
convicts and hostages had been killed.
In a chaotic scene, newsmen shouted
questions up to him.
"How about the cut throats?" some-
one shouted. The question was asked
several times. Houlihan demurred sever-
al times and then said, "Several host-
ages had their throats slashed."
He was not asked and he did not say
where his information came from.
Several media carried reports of the
slashing deaths that day without at-
tribution, stating as fact that this was
how the hostages died.

However, Dr. John F. Edland, Mon-
roe County medical examiner, reported
after his autospies that all hostages had
died from gunshot wounds and "there
were no cut throats or any kind of mu-
tilation."
To this day, according to Houlihan,
the correction commission still dis-
putes Edland's findings that none of
the slain hostages had had his throat
slashed.
Today, most sources of official in-
formation are closed, under the stamp
of an official investigation being con-
ducted by Deputy State Atty. Gen. Ro-
bert F. Fischer.
Some of the answers may lie in still-
unreleased filmed records-on video-
tape and in hundreds of still photo-
graphs - of the actual assault.

SNEAK PREVIEW TONITE!
"UNFORGETTABLE! IT IS SO BEAUTIFUL
THAT IT REQUIRES MORE THAN ONE VISIT!"
-The New Yorker
WANE BOSPRSETS FLMYLUCHr\NO VISCO J
TARGDIPK BOGARDE 'DEATH IN VENiCE" / B ADRSEN
LV-ST V MUUI#i~cws REE PLA" B VISCONTI BADALUCCO
FROM THE NOVELS? ~iT~aS MM j' PRtODUCEO 'fWCIN ISCON(('l~ TI / ASSOCIATE EXECUTvE PECO~UCE
ERECUTV EPRODUCR -IRA O / PO WARNER BROS .A UNNEY LEISURE SERim
SNEAK PREIEW at 6:45
with ANN MARGARET
STAR OF "CARNAL KNOWLEDGE"

news briefs
By The Associated Press
REP. RICHARD POFF (R-Va.) viewed as a, likely appointee
to the Supreme Court, removed his name yesterday from the list
of prospective candidates.
He said in a statement that he has asked President Nixon:
not to consider his name because the Senate confirmation process
"would be protracted and controversial."
The congressman has drawn the fire of Civil rights groups be-
cause of his votes on bills in that field and because he joined otherj
members of Congress in signing the so-called Southern Manifesto
opposing racial integration of schools.
FIREBOMBINGS and window smashings were reported by
police in Jacksonville, Fla. as racial violence continued Friday
night.
Two buildings were firebombed and several persons were ar-
rested in an inner-city black neighborhood according to police.
Police said a crowd of about 500 blacks and 300 whites were
pelted with rocks as they left a high school football game. One car
was set on fire, but the flames were quickly extinguished, police said.
The racist unrest came in the wake of a Wednesday morning
shootout in which a black youth was killed and a policeman wounded.
* A *
SECRETARY OF STATE William P. Rogers believes t h e
diplomatic consensus here favors an accord on reopening the
Suez Canal as the only practical approach toward an over-all
Mideast settlement.
Rogers and his top Mideast expert, Asst. Secretary of State Jos-
eph Sisco, are putting forward a six-point Suez settlement plan as a
high priority item in their backstage meetings here.
Ro'gers' proposal covers the opening of the canal, extension of
the cease-fire, withdrawal of Israel from the canal area, and the
nature of the Egyptian presence in the vacated area.
* * *
CHANCELLOR WILLY BRANDT will call for new elections if
his East European policy is rejected by the West German parlia-
ment, government spokesman Conrad Ahlers said yesterday.
Ahlers said that if the Bundestag votes down ratification of the
treaties with the Soviet Union and Poland, which Brandt initialledj
last year, Brandt will call the new elections to test popular senti-
ment on his opening to the East.
THE SENATE has passed and sent to the House a resolution
directing the Nixon administration to increase federal payments
to the states for school lunches for needy youngsters.
The measure, passed 75 to 5 Friday, would in effect increase the
federal contribution per lunch from 35 to 46 cents.

Jail conditions
protested across
United States

*

By The Associated Press
Peaceful demonstrations were staged in parts of the
country yesterday to protest conditions in U.S. prisons.
Among speakers during the day were radical activists
Tom Hayden, in Los Angeles; the Rev. James Groppi, in
Sandstone, Minn, and David Dellinger, in Danbury.
A coalition of groups, including some peace organiza-
tions, sponsored the day's activities. No instances of vio-
lence were reported.
Approximately 100 persons heard Rev. Groppi describe
prisons as "an example of racism and a sick society." He
spoke at a park a mile outs- -
from the Federal Correctional " "
Institute in Sandstone. Nine tailors

-Associated Press
PROTESTS AGAINST prison conditions included one by some
50 inmates of the Orleans Parish Prison demanding better sani-
tary facilities. Sheriff Louis Heyd meets with prisoners to tell
therma n bi mhpvis nn thv wa.

"Instead of trying to rehabili-
tate prisoners in a cage we should
abolish prisons," said Groppi.

wy.In Dallas several demonstrators
appeared on the lawn of the
DEBATE NEXT WEEK: County Courthouse to read com-
plaints compiled by inmates about
in tr ducemedical treatment, overcrowding,
Senate toitrenew visiting rights, food, mail censor-
ship and isolation cells.
About 25 members of a group
called Direct Action and the Vie'
amtendments to end W nam Veterans against the Wa
By The Associated Press distributed leaflets at the Travis
By Te Asociaed PessLana that U.S. troops be w i t h- County Jail in Austin, Tex.
Senate critics of the Indochina drawn in six months if prisoners
war are planning two efforts this are freed. The leaflets protested "the de-
week to limit U.S. involvement plorable dehumanizing treatment
in Laos and Cambodia-dplus a TheChuh-Cooeaenm y of people who are jailed in oeu r
new effort to cut off all war fllyds will be offered to the foreign aid community." A candlelight vigil
and force complete American authorization bill now before the was planed.
withdrawal. Foreign Relations Committee, ra-
Otiwar amendments also ther than the $21 billion military An estimated 150 persons
!aedefor action. procurement bill, the vehicle for mrhdna h okCut
are due Fra ch(n. dho}Mansfield's amendment. Jail in Chicago, while 200 as-
Sens. Frank Church (D-Idaho) sembled to hear Black Panther
and John Sherman Cooper, (R- Meanwhile, Sen. Stuart Sy- Party Chairman Bobby Seale out-
Ky., are drafting an amendment mington, (D-Mo.), hopes to win side San Quentin, Calif.
that would cut off war funds at approval Monday of an amend- At the Wisconsin Home for
an as yet unspecified date, if ment to the arms bill that would Wome iTchnsdnHoe for
the prisoners 'are freed. mn oteam ilta ol Women in Taycheedah about 50
The Senate last weekdapproved put a lid of $200 million-less marchers "walked by the institu-
a proposal by Senate Democratic! than half of the planned. $490.2 tion and then disappeared," ac-
leader Mike Mansfield of Mon-'million-on U.S. spending in Laos. cording to officials there.

go AWOL to
protest war
SAN DIEGO, Calif. () Nine
sailors were flown to their ship
Saturday following their arrest
at a church where they had taken
sanctuary to avoid sailing to the
Southeast Asia war zone.
The sailors' ship, the aircraft
carrier USS Consteliation, 1 e f t
San Piego on Friday after weeks
of protests by antiwar groups who
sought to prevent its departure,
calling it a symbol of escalation
in the war.
The crewmen, some of whom
entered the church Wednesday,
were declared deserters by offic-
ials aboard the ship after it left
port, but naval officials said af-
ter the arrests no specific charges
had been filed against the sailors.

O 0 PIPTH Forum
FIFTHAVENUE AT LUSERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 761.9700

SUNDAY
"VEN ICE" 2:15,4:30,9
"SNEAK" 6:45 P.M.

COMING SOON
Ken Russell's "THE DEVILS"

'U I

I

Give The
Bear abreak.
You're the only one who can.
Because all Smokey can do is ask you to help prevent forest fires.
He can't break your matches. Or douse your campfires. Or snuff out
your cigarets.
Only you can.
"So, please, lend Smokey a hand.
And maybe while you're at it, lend him your voice too: tell people to
give the bear a break.
He deserves it.
So does America. f

MN 0
- I>8 -

FEATURES
THIS WEEK

LAST NIGHT
THE ALLEY-330 Maynard
ARTHUR 'BIG BOY' CRUDUP
HElvis Presley's Inspirational Idol"
AND
JOHNNY SHINES

8:30

$2.25

MONDAY-

Rock Concert with

PINBALL ALLEY IN THE BASEMENT
NEXT WEEK-OOCT. 9, 10-DR. ROSS LIGHTIN' SLIM

L

I

I

THE WHIZ KIDS
Two Young Ann Arbor Music ians Playing the Piano,
Organ, Sax, and Drums. A Fantastic Show!
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY-
BOB SPRINGFIELD
Singing the Big Hits of the Fifties and
Sixties, also Folk Music
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY-
THE GASLITERS
Our Famous Gay Nineties Banjo Sing Along Band

ARM/ Michigan Film Society
Issho yi Gong and Ecumenical Campus Center
THIS WEEK
two modern classic films by
AKIRA KUROSAWA
IKIRU Tuesday, Oct. 5
"Kurosawa's most notable achievement in a long
line of masterpieces."
-SATURDAY REVIEW
A man learns he is to die in six months from cancer:
panic, desperation, resolve. Finally, only the audi-
ence sees . .
1st Presbyterian Church-1432 Washtenaw
7 & 9:30 p.m. -off S. University-
7 Samurai Friday-Saturday, Oct. 8-9
"Maanificent Seven"-"It is not only Kurosawa's

I

I

DINNERS
EVERY NIGHT
4:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.

PIZZA Only
After 9:00 P.

HOURS
Mon.-Thurs. 4 P.M.-1 A.M.
Fri. and Sat. 4 P.M.-2 A.M.
Sunday 4 P.M.-12 A.M.
.I
* /' P~ tA/1U

i

':::

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