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October 02, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-02

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i.

U , (tI/i £ki Club
MASS MEETING
MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971
7:00 p.m.-Union Ballroom
. Christmas Trip to Innsbruck
" Spring Trip to Aspen

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Saturday, October 2, 1971

Saturday, October 2, 197]
h

n ews brAiefs
By The Associated Press

arm
'for, San

ury

indicts seven

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Quentin

murders

FRIDAY, SATURDAY
FINN IGAN'S WAKE (1959)
film adaptation of James Joyce's novel done by di-
rector Mary Ellen Bute with an Irish cast.
- AND-
FILM (1965)
pantomime with Buster Keaton, written by Samuel
Beckett, and directed by Alan Schneider.
SHOWN TOGETHER - 7 and 9:15
75c AUD. A

HOUSE SUPPORTERS of the school desegregation bill have
agreed to accept a provision that could lead to a rehiring of
thousands of dismissed black teachers.
Bidding for votes to get the bill out of the Education and Labor
Committee, the Republican managers have pledged support for an
amendment that would require school districts to rehire any black
teachers or principals displaced by desegregation before the dis-
tricts can share in the $1.5 billion the bill would make available.
Despite attempts by members to get a quorum of the committee
together, one additional person was needed.

The bill is supported by Reps. William Clay,
H. Quie, (R-Minn.), and Alphonzo Bell, (R-Calif.)
Reps. William Ford, (D-Mich.), and James O'Hara,

(D-Mo.), Albert
and opposed by
(D-Mich.).

PAF

i

Rep. Augustus Hawkins, (D-Calif.), who also supports the bill,
accused Ford and O'Hara of blocking the bill to prevent voting on
the busing issue. Recent court orders requiring desegregation in De-
troit and Pontiac have made busing a controversial issue in their dis-
tricts.
SEN. GEORGE McGOVERN said yesterday that if he is
elected president next year,.he will grant "a general amnesty" to
people who went to jail or to foreign countries in opposition to
the Vietnam- War.
"The first thing I would do is to end that war," he told a Uni-_
versity of Nebraska audience.
The South Dakota Democrat, first to announce his candidacy
for the Democratic presidential nomination next year, said there
is historical precedent for such a move, noting President Lincoln}
made such a declaration toward the Confederacy after the Civil War.
McGovern's amnesty pledge brought cheers from thestudents
and his 15-minute speech, followed by 45 minutes of answering
f questions from the floor, was often punctuated by applause.
RALPH BUNCHE, one of the leading UN figures, has been
forced by failing health to retire after a quarter-century of
trouble-shooting for the world organization.
Bunche was unofficially placed on retired status last June when
he was in critical condition, but the announcement came yesterday
after word of his retirement leaked out.
U Thant paid tribute to Bunche's "unique and invaluable serv-4
fn U.+h n,,

SAN RAFAEL, Calif. (A - A
Marin County grand jury yes-
terday indicted fugitive attor-
ney Stephen Bingham and
six San Quentin convicts on
murder charges in the Aug. 21
violence at the prison in
which George Jackson and
five others died.
The indicted inmates in-
clude Fleeta Drumgo, one of the
two surviving Soledad Brothers
charged with murder of a Soledad
prisonrguard in Jan. 1970.
After listening to 20 hours of
testimony from 25 witnesses, the
19 member grand jury returned
the indictments against Bingham,
29-year old grandson of former
Connecticut Governor and Sen.
Hiram Bingham; Drumgo, 26;
Hugo Pinell, 27; John Spain, 22;
Louis Talamantes, 28; David
Johnson, 24 and Willie Tate, 27.
The seven indicted are charged
with five counts of murder in the
deaths of three prison guards and
two white inmates. They also are
charged with conspiracy to com-
mit escape by force of violence,
conspiracy to possess a firearm in
a prison and conspiracy to kidnap
correctional officers.
The indictment does not charge
anyone in the death of Jackson, a
29-year-old black revolutionary
and author, who authorities say
was shot and killed by a guard
while running across an open pri-
son courtyard in an abortive es-
cape attempt.
In detailing the alleged con-
spiracy, the indictment said Bing-
ham gave Jackson an automatic
pistol and clips during a visit
shortly before the violence erupt-
ed - and that Jackson used the
gun to kill Sgt. Jere Graham, 39.
Bingham, a former Peace Corps
worker and activist in the civil
rights and grape strike move-.
ments, is being sought on a fed-
dral charge of unlawful flight to

r -Associated Press
PICKETS FROM a dozen surrounding communities joined with the Pontiac-based National Action
Group (NAG) yesterday to picket the Pontiac Board of Education office.
NAG declares state-wide boycott
to fight forced school busing
PONTIAC, Mich. UP) - Irene at the gate of the bus depot on tion caused only minor delay.
McCabe, leader of the anti- the city's north side. During about the first week o
busing National Action Group, However a show of force quickly school last month, the Nationa
called yesterday for a statewide dispersed the demonstration, Nes- Action Group, (NAG) the main
boycott of schools Oct. 25 to pro- bitt said, antibusing force, demonstrated al-
test the busing of children to at- Kamsdilathebsep.
a racial balance in schools. r a dBurnside, director of s
ransportation for the Pontiac Anumber of people were ar-
She also called for a massive school board, said the demonstra- rested.

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U fMinSociety
TONIGH T
Woman, in the Dunes
1964 Cannes, Montreal, New York Prizewinner
dir., Hiroshi Teshigahara
"In this strangely poetic drama is encompassed a dis-
turbing allegory of the fate of man in the world."
-N.Y. Times
"Teshigahra gets to the root in visual terms that are
overpowering."r
-Judith Crist }
info: 761-7849
Ir
NAT. SCI. AUD.
7 & 9:15 $1.25
. . ;; a::........ .a<....!i :i $T .
4i' Y;i . at..v,.,... ':... ":.,. ...l...,, .. ,C.:. ..... ....;?:eo+' ..-.v" x....

icest ot Uhe ni Ied Nations since the touning or the organization."
Spokesmdn for both the American and British delegations ex-
pressed hope that the retirement was not permanent, but those
Sclosest to Bunche do not expect his return.
The United States will seek to replace Bunche with another
American, the State Department indicated yesterday.
INCREASED FEDERAL PAYMENTS to the states for free
and reduced price school lunches for needy children were ap-
proved by a 75-5 vote in the Senate yesterday.
A resolution was sent to the House that would increase the fed-
eral payment per lunch from 35 cents to 46 cents.
A supplemental money bill will be introduced in the near future
to finance the resolution. Similar plans have been presented to the
House and are awaiting action in the Education and Labor Com-
mittee.

c
~t

f
1l
n

voter registration drive Oct. 26
and said she plans to organize a
protest march on Lansing.
McCabe made her announce-
ments while leading some 350
pickets in a demonstration before
the Pontiac Board of Education,
which is following orders of U.S.
District Judge Damon Keith to,
bus 9,000 of 24,000 pupils to ac-

vv vva vvua w f)Kl\i Vai{r \11i111V i1U V1 GL's i

a co cu.

MUSIC AND LEAFLETS
U.S. attacks with propaganda,

I I

complish racial balance.
Opposing the Talmadge resolution were Sens. Allen Ellender, (D-
La.), chairman of appropriations and former chairman of agricul- Originally McCabe's g r o u p
ture; Sen. Milton Young, (R-N.D.), senior GOP member of appropria- called for a statewide boycott of,
tions; Sen. George Aiken, (R-Vt), GOP member of agriculture; Sen. schools yesterday - when a head-i
Robert Stafford, (R-Vt.) and Sen. Roman Hruska, (R-Vt.), a senior count of pupils was made to es-
appropriations member. tablish each district's share in

i

state aid.

A * *

ANTI-POLLUTION PROJECTS of a group of Wayne State But this was called off, Mrs.
University students were abandoned after collecting 430 tons of McCabe saying that if districts
discarded bottles, 30 tons of paper and 4 tons of cans. were to lose money because of a
The group, which has labored most week-ends since last Febru- boycott "it would only hurt the
Ichildren."

QUANG NGAI, South Viet-
nam (PNS) - "You must leave
this area immediately. There
will be artillery and airstrikes
tomorrow morning. Evacuate to
the east to avoid an accident.
There will be artillery and air-
strikes tomorrow m o r n i n g.
Evacuate to the east."
Written in Vietnamese with
pictures of U.S. B-52's and Co-
bra gunships on the reverse of
the page, messages like this one
fall regularly on the people of
Quang Ngai, in conjunction
with loudspeaker broadcasts.
They are part of a highly spe-
cialized and refined form of
warfare, which gets little pub-
licity, called Psychological Op-
erations (PsyOps).
With headquarters in Taiwan,
the Army's 7th PsyOps Bat-
talion operates unique programs
that run from esoteric bars of

i --

ary, blamed government and citizen apathy fpr their decision to halt
collections.

.. . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . .

However splinter groups oppos-,
ing school busing made what po-
lice described as a "minor at-
tempt" yesterday to prevent theI
buses from leaving the city school
bus depot.
Police Lt. William Nesbitt said
several persons stalled their cars

WORSHIP

soap that dissolve leaving a pro-
U.S. message in the user's palm
(reported in South Korea), to
the leaflet - loudspeaker prop-
aganda functions carried out
from the PsyOps Center in
Quang Ngai.
Selections from the Army's
1971 propaganda catalogue are
classified according to purpose,
theme, and method of dissemin-
ation. Most are broadcast from
helicopters, though the noise of
the Huey chopper from which
they are played usually makes
it impossible to hear them..
The purpose of those whose
theme is "evacuate the area''
used only on people designated
"pro-Government of Vietnam"
(GVN) by Saigon, is listed as
either "to protect the lives of
GVN supporters" or "save the
lives of innocent people".
Any region still inhabited af-
ter being blasted with PsyOps
warnings is automatically ene-
my territory. In the words of
the most frequently used re-
cording, "You must evacuate
this area immediately as the
GVN and Allied Forces are be-
ginning an operation. If you
stay you will be considered Viet
Cong. Evacuate immediately!"
Such warnings, however, are
not always effective. People
who are so closely tied to their
land do not give it up willingly.
Hundreds of thousands of
people have been driven from
~TATE
At State & Liberty Sts.
DIAL 662-6264
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

their homes in what is euphe-
mistically labelled "forced ur-
banization", and thousands
more have been killed by the
massive bombings that follow
PsyOps broadcasts.
Copyright 1971 Pacific News Service
Dental Bldg.
opening set
The new Dental Bldg. will be
dedicated Oct. 18. The $17 million,
brick and bronze-glass building
houses the third largest dental
school in the United States and is
believed to be, at this time, the
most modern in the world.
The new structure at the north-
east corner of Fletcher and N.
University Ave. replaces a 63-
year - old instructional building
and has nearly doubled the
school's capacity to graduate den-
tists and dental hygienists, Dr.
Mann said.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10, by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.
Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
AND CENTER
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
Worship-9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m. (Folk Mass)
and 1 p.m. (Holy Communion),
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-Program.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer (chapel).
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Mr. Ran-
dolph H. Thrasher, Jr.-"The Common
Cup, the Common Loaf."
World Wide Communion Sunday.
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 a.m. to noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Oct. 3:
5:30 p.m.-Celebration, Wesley Lounge.
6:1 5 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room, 50c.
7:00-8:30 p.m.-Movie and Discussion fo-
cusing on "The Christian Revolution-Our
Mission."
Monday, Oct. 4:
8:00-9:30 p.m.-"Christian Concepts in the
70's" with Ed McCracken, Wesley Lounge.
Wednesday, Oct. 6:
Noon-Luncheon Discussion: "Why Situation
Ethics?" with5Bartlett C. Beavin, Pine
Room. Lunch 25c.
Thursday, Oct. 7:
Noon - Luncheon Discussion: "The Christian
and Militarism" with Bartlett C. Beavin,
Pine Room. Lunch 25c.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:30 a.m.--Services.
Sunday at 9:15 o.m.-Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Supper-Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Vespers.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.

"UN FORGETTABLE I
IT IS SO BEAUTIFUL
THAT IT
REQUIRES, MORE
THAN ONE VISIT!"
-The New Yorker

I

Sermon-"Worldwide Communion."
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Church School and Service at 10:30 a.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw

.I

.

"REMARKABLE! A
STUNNING VISUAL
RECREATION
-New York
"EXTRAORDINARILY
BEAUTIFUL"
-Rex Reed
"A MASTERWORK OF
POWER AND BEAUTY"
-Cue
"V ISCON T I'S
MASTERPIECE!"
-Medemoiselle

i
ii
3 agGns
sn
xx x
Fy }f .
R nK.,.

Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
NORTHSIDE PRESBYTERIAN
ST. AIDANS EPISCOPAL
NORTH CAMPUS
1679 Broadway, opposite Baits Dr.
Holy Eucharist (Episcopal)-8:30 and 10:00
a.m.

' Fona
usrndinir
again...

DIAL 8-6416
MEET GINGER
Her weapon is
her body... She
can cut you, kill '
you or cure you!'

II V,4 4k4

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