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October 01, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 1, 1971

SUIT PREDICTED:
U.S. court overturns
Leslie Bacon arrest

Ex-LSA Dean Hays rejoins 'U'
staff after one year sabbattical

SAN FRANCISCO (P)-A feder-
al appeals court yesterday quashed
the arrest warrant for anti-war
activist Leslie Bacon as a material
witness in the government's in-
vestigation of the March 1 bomb-
ing of the U.S. Capitol.
Bacon's lawyer said here after-
ward that the anti-war activist
would sue the government for false,

jail because of a hearsay affida-
vit," he said. "We have a substan-
tial false arrest suit against the
government. It may involve sub-
stantial damages."
Schaap said he expected to an-
nounce details of the suit within
the next few days after meefing
with Bacon and others in New
York. He said he was not certain

(Continued from Page 1)
From his office on the third
floor of the Administration Bldg.,
Hays functions as a sort of "idea
man" working out new programs
for University curricula.
Hays spoke last week about his
new job and what he hopes to ac-
complish with it.
The future of the University,
Hays said, lies in providing a di-
verse decentralized educational
experience. Universities will tend
to "spread out" rather than "sit-
ting like a monolith in'East Lan-

sing or Ann Arbor," he prophi-
sized.
Under Hays' vision Univer-
sities would become more involv-
ed in serving the community
around them, more engaged in
educating the general population
than a narrowly defined group
of "students."
In fact, students as a clearly
defined group would disappear.
They would, according to Hays,
"embark on " a career" while re-
ceiving formal education on a
part time basis.

arrest. in which city the action would be
In a sense, the ruling is a vin- filed.
dication," said her New York at- Acting on a habeas corpus pe-
torney, William H. Schaap, after tition, the 9th U. S. Circuit Court
the decision was announced on the of Appeals said the government
West Coast. should have subpoenaed her first,
"But Leslie spent two months in before seeking a warrant of ar-
- ------- - - - rest.
o7 l es "Then she would have had the
'Woin1an loses opportunity to decide whether or
not to answer," the 24 page opin-
ion said.

I

Concert series expanded

abortion
(Continued from Pa

case Bacon, 19, of Atherton, Calif.,
was arrested last April 2 in Wash-
ge 1) ington. D. C., and originally held

abortion. She said she didn't feel'
there was anything wrong with
what she did-it didn't affect any-
body else," Rogers said.
He said the 20-year maximum
sentence applies in the case be-
cause Wheeler was convicted of
aborting a "quick" child, that is.
in the mid-term of her pregnancy.
A spokesman for the Florida at-
torney general's office said he had
no knowledge of anybody ever be-
ing prosecuted or convicted for
having an abortion in Florida.
Neither the spokesman nor Volusia
County State Atty. Stephen Boyles
would say why authorities had
evoked the century-old law in this
particular case.
Wheeler was unavailable for
comment.
Much controversy has been gen-
erated by the decision to try
Wheeler instead of the abortionist.
A spokesman for the Daytona
Beach News Journal said, "They
never get the abortionist-just the
poor girl who was left holding the
bag."

on $100,000 bail as a material
witness in the Capitol bombings.
She was transferred to Seattle
and was held in contempt by a
federal grand jury there for re-
fusing to answer some questions
put to her after being granted
limited immunity.
The office of her San Francisco
attorney, Benjamin Dreyfus, said
Bacon currently is in New York
City.
The 9th Circuit Court last June
24 upheld the contempt citation
but allowed her to appeal to the
U. S. Supreme Court.
On the same day that decision
was issued, a federal grand jury
in New York indicted her on a
charge of conspiring with six other
persons to firebomb a branch of
the First National Bank.
The indictment charged t h a t
Bacon took part in a rehearsal of
the attack in New York-which
was thwarted by the police-and
of manufacturing i n c e n d i a r y
bombs.
Miss Bacon formally denied the
charge.

I!
3

(Continued from Page 1)
cheaper rental rates than the
Crisler Arena.
Originally, UAC allocated $12,-
500 "seed money" for the concert
series. With capital accumulated
from Daystar's early success, UAC
hopes to continue the series
through December with eight or
nine concerts expected.
The financing comes through
a Daystar account, of which UAC
is a permanent co-sponsor, con-
trolling at least 25 per cent of the
returns for each concert.
For the first two concerts, which
featured Muddy Waters and
Mountain, UAC and Project Com-
munity shared equally in the pro-
fits, estimated by Andrews at
$1,000 for the first concert and
perhaps twice that amount for the
second.

Two more organizations have
agreed to co-sponsor the upcom-
ing B.B. King and Howlin' Wolf
concert: the Inter - Cooperative
Council and the Afro - American
Center.
The expanded concert program
is part of an effort by UAC to
respond more directly to student
needs. Once considered a stu-
dent group almost entirely com-
posed of fraternity and sorority
members, UAC has often been
associated with traditional social
events rather than community-
oriented projects.
Other items on UAC's agenda
now include sponsoring a summer
crafts fair, faculty symposiums,
student theater productions and a
series of "controversy" speakers-
with Lester Maddox and David
Harris scheduled to appear.
In addition to the B. B. King'
concert slated for Oct. 8. three
successive concerts will be held
during Homecoming (Oct. 28-30).
On Thursday, Oct. 28, Pink
Floyd will perform, and Friday,
the Parliaments and the Funka-
delics will play.
Andrews has also arranged a re-
appearancehat Crisler of Ike and
Tina Turner for Nov. 19, but his
month-long effort to book the
GratefulhDead for a December
concert has been fruitless.
With its original deficit almost
completely wiped out, UAC is en-
thusiastic about prospects for the
series' continuation throughout
the academic year, and Andrews
expresses hope for an eventual
program to include 20 concerts
per year, including an annual
jazz festival.

In line with this broader mis-
sion, Hays sees a need to "recon-
stitute the University to serve"
the society in which it operates.
Environmental problems, urban
studies, and community psycholo-
gy are all areas in which Hays
said the University should involve
itself.
In order to accomplish this,
Hays said, these problems will
have to be dealt with on an "in-
terdisciplinary level."
"The old academic designations
are breaking down", he said, and
social problems will have to be
dealt .with from a variety of aca-
demic vantage points.
Areas of study would be broad-
ly redefined corresponding to
specific social problems, rather
than traditional academic disci-
plines.
While expressing an interest in
many technological innovations in
teaching, Hays stressed the neces-
sity of not using technology mere-
ly because it is available, but care-
fully studying its relevance to a
given area of study.
The growing use of computers,
for example, is helpful in study
areas where problem solving is an
essential part of the learning ex-
perience, Hays said. "I can't con-
ceive, however, of using it in En-
glish literature," he added.
Television also can be useful in
certain fields, he said. "A multi-
media approach" may have "more
grab" for art students than the
traditional teaching methods.
Hays spoke in an easy, expan-
sive manner seemingly glad to be
back at the University despite the
controversies and conflict associa-
ted with his past here.
Removed from the firing line as
dean of the literary college to the
relative quiet of administrative
planning, Hays appeared eager to
take part in the plans which may
well shape the future course of the
University.
WNRZ-FM
Ann Arbor's only
stereo radio station
102.9g, .
Progressive Music.

Thieu sees
large turnout
(Continued from Page 3)
areas where people are less polit-
ically aware than in the cities,
and where it is easier for Thieu-
appointed officials to lead them
to the polls. Most 'will go through
the simple procedure of taking the
Thieu ballot, putting it in an en-
velope, and dropping it in the box.
They will do so for three basic
reasons. Voting for Thieu is the
least complicated thing to do.
They believe it is expected of
them. And they know that local
officials can make life difficult
for them.
Most peasants are surely un-
aware of city demonstrations and
of the anti-Thieu communiques
issued by opposition groups urging
a boycott of the election.
Even inySaigon, citizens a few
blocks away have carried out their
daily routine, either unaware of
or unconcerned with the protests.
Many of the demonstrations have
been staged by the same hard
core of radical students and dis-
abled veterans, moving from place
to place. Police and troops have
been quick to react, mostly with
tear gas, and with very' little ac-
tual violence.
In no case have the demonstra-
tors been able to rouse more than
bystanders' curiosity.
UAC-DAYSTAR presents
THE BLUES GREATS
B.B. KING
HOWLIN WOLF
Fri., Oct. 8-Hill Aud.
9:00 P.M.
Tickets on Sale
Mich. Union-Salvation
Records
$2.50, $3.50, $4.50
For the student body:
FLARES
by
& Levi
A Farah
^ Wright
A Lee
S Male
State Street at Liberty

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I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

State school
Ltax system hit
child regardless of whether he
Slived in a rich or poor district,
a major change from the pres-
ent system.
Kelley said he would seek to
have the present financing sys-
tem declared "unconstitutional
as violating the equal protec-
tion of the law provision of both
the state and the federal con-
stitutions."
He cited an example of a
$260 per child difference in sup-
port between two districts in
the same county.
Kelley estimated it would take
at least four months for the
court to issue a ruling on the
financing question.
Kelley said that to issue an
opinion from the attorney's gen-
eral's office rather than seek a
court ruling would cause chaos
in th6 .current school year. He
said the issue would eventually
be settled in the courts, anyway.
However, the proposal died in
the Senate.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan.Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1
Day Calendar
Commission on Women: 3540 SAB,
3-5 pm.
Apollo 15 Astronauts: Technical
Briefing, Rackham Lect. Hall, 3 pm.
Astronomy Seminar: K.V. Flannery,
"What Really Happened in the Con-
ference on Communications with Ex-
traterrestrial Intelligence," P&A Col-
loquium Rm., 4 pm.
Internat'l Folk Dance: Barbour Gym,
3 pm.
School of Music: University Philhar-
monia, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
General Notices
Computing Center Weekend Hours:
Saturdays, 8 am to 10 pm; Sundays, 2
to 10:30 pm (MTS becomes operation-
al at 2:30 pm); N. Univ. Bldg. remote
batch station is never open on Sat.
and Sun.; keypunches and terminals
are avail. at ,Computing Ctr., however;
there is no counseling service on Sun.,
anywhere.j
WNRZ-FM
Stereo underground

Organization Notces
Graduate Outing Club, Oct. 3, 1:30
PM. Hiking at Peach Mountain, rain or
shine. Meet at Huron St. entrance to
Rackham Bldg.
Bahai Student Group meeting, Oct. 3.
Bahai films at International Student
Center, 603 E. Madison 3:00 PM. and at
Rive Gauche, 1024 Hill, 7:00 PM.
U.M. Ski Club mass meeting, Oct. 4,
7:00 PM Union Ballroom. Sign-ups for
Ymastripto Innsbrock, Austria and
Spring break to Aspen, Colorado.

-I

Creative Shabbal Service
Guest: HON. M. RAVIV
COUNSUL, ISRAELI EMBASSY
WASHINGTON, D.C.
FRIDAY, OCT. 1, 6:15 P.M.
HILLEL, 1429 HILL

i

#t 4( tICd Club
MASS MEETING
MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971
7:00 p.m.-Union Ballroom

I

0

Christmas Trip to Innsbruck
Spring Trip to Aspen

e

I

I

All-Talking

All-Dancing

_ _ _ _-___ ____
Today is the LAST DAY to
Sign-up for an Interview
to become a member of:
" LSA Student Gov. Executive Council
* LSA Student Gov. Admin. Vice-Pres.
" LSA Complaint Service
- University-wide Judiciary
~ Joint Student-Faculty Committees
(Library, Curriculum, RC Evaluation)
Come to ROOM 3M, UNION
4-5 p.m., or leave message
INTERVIEWS BEGIN MON., OCT. 4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Phone

764-0558 to Subscribe to

FREE
COME HEAR

All-Singing

YOUR

MIND

"Sid Shrycock Goes to Africa"

1

02.9

MASS MEETING
SATURDAY, OCT. 2-11:00 a.m.
Henderson Room at the League

A FREE TALK ENTITLED
"CLOSING THE GAPS"
By GEITH PLIMMER, C .S of London, England
MON., OCT. 4-8:00 P.M.

UAC-DAYSTAR presents
THE BLUES GREATS
B.B. KING
HOWLIN WOLF
Fri., Oct. 8-Hill Aud.
9:00 P.M.
Tickets on Sale
Mich. Union-Salvation
Records
$2.50, $3.50, $4.50

3rd Floor--UGLI

Auditions: Sat.,
Sun., Oct.

Oct. 2-11:30-4:00
3-1:00-5:00

I

GIVEN BY
The Christian Science Organization
FOR EVERYONE

11

I

11

'WHY IS IT THAT IN THE COKE
MACHINE OF LIFE THE
"CORRECT CHANGE ONLY"
SIGN IS ALWAYS LIT?
Carlton, Raleigh, Turin, Bertin,
Triumph, Holdsworth, Witcomb,
Bob Jackson, Pogliaghi.
Touring and Racing parts and
accessories. Complete repair fa-
cilities for all Racing and Tour-
ing bicycles.
TURIN
r I

We want to talk to you
about a career in law ..
R without law school.
When you become a Lawyer's Assistant, you'll
be doing work traditionally done by lawyers-
work we think you'll find challenging and
responsible. And Lawyer's Assistants are now
so critically needed that The Institute for
Paralegal Training can offer you a position
in the city of your choice and a higher salary
than you'd expect as a recent college gradu-
ate. You'll work with lawyers on interesting
legal problems-and the rewards will grow
as you do.
A representative of The Institute for Para-
legal Training will conduct interviews on:
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6
Inquire at Placement Office

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"Al I j Es
O AMYWHE

"Mobile-Corder"
Portable cassette tape recorder. MODEL 762
Voice of Music tape recorders look better, sound
better, and have a better price, thanks to Benton
Harbor, Michigan, where they make it better-with all
the new ideas, but in the old, careful way. Here's a
recorder that olavs all nonular new cassette tane

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