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September 28, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-28

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

C4r

Sfr~igaun

IBat

page three

ann arbor film cooperative
Gregory Peck, Orson Welles in John Huston's
MOBY DICK
based on Herman Melville's novel
Screenplay by Ray Bradbury and John Huston
TUESDAY - September 28 - ONLY!

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, September 28, 1971

y TAbriefs
By The Associated Prtess

iNew

Mansfield

auditorium a
angell hall

7 & 9:30 p.m.,

still only 75c
children 35c

J proposal seeks

COMING THURSDAY-Midnight Cowboy
THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT-TUESDAY, SEPT. 28
ON THE
WATERFRONT
dir. ElJA KAZAN, 1954
With BRANDO, ROD STEIGER, KARL MALDEN,
LEE J. COBB, EVA MARIE SAINT
SHOWS AT 7 AND 9:30 P.M.
$1.00
330 Maynard
across from Nickels Arcade
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative
THE ALLEY presents
330 MAYNARD
Fri.-Sot.-Sun.; Oct. 1, 2, 3
2 shows 2 shows 1 show
ARTHUR "BIG BOY" CRUDUP
"ONE OF THE GREATEST BLUES ARTISTS OF ALL TIME"
Elvis Presley's Inspirational Tool"
PLUS
JOHNNY SHINES
spent his early years with Robert Johnson and played with all
the greats-Muddy Waters, Otis Spann, Little Walter, and Sonny
Boy Williamson
TICKETS ALL SHOWS $2.25
ADVANCE TICKETS: SALVATION RECORDS
330 MAYNARD-1103 S. UNIV.
COMING. Oct. 9, 10: DR. ROSS-LIGHTIN' SLIM
OCT. 15, 16, 17: ALBERT KING
OCT. 22, 23, 24: JIMMY REED & THE CHICAGO BLUES BAND
Pinball Alley Waiting Room in the Basement

PRESIDENT NIXON AND EMPEROR HIROHITO of Japan.r, r."i
met for 25 minutes Sundaynight in Anchorage, Alaska
White House officials said even though there was nothing specific
to announce, the private discussion between the President and the;
emperor and brief talks with their key diplomatic advisors, produced
enough of a feeling of good will to ease, somewhat, the strained rela-
tions between the U.S. and Japan.
Hirohito is the first reigning Japanese emperor to visit a foreign
land in the 2,631 history of the monarch.,
REP. MORRIS UDALL, (D-Ariz.), yesterday alleged there is
a strong appearance om impropriety" in the selection of under- i? :::
writers for a $250 millionhoffering of U.S. Postal Service bonds. . «:"<>..aid
Udall, chairman of the House Postal Service subcommitesi
a two-month investigation by his staff found no "compelling" evidence !
of violations of the criminal code but accused postal officials of a ,,:
lesser degree of misconduct and impropriety."
* * *
THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA) yesterday
said it has found a persistent and poisonous chemical called
PCBs in seven packaged food products. Hirohito i
The chemical is apparently the result of contamination from con-! Emperor Hirohito of Japan (s
tainer's made of recycled cardboard. mark's King Frederik. Hirohit
The FDA said it found the DDT-like chemical in one sample' following a two hour stop in An
of Sunshine shredded wheat at a tlevel 48 times the federal action with President Nixon. (See New
guideline. The agency also found the chemical at levels up to four -- -____
times the federal standard in shredded wheat, spaghetti dinner, corn LEADERS MEET:
meal, mixed baby cereal, grits, noodle dinner and pancake mix.

U.S.

withdrawal

WASHINGTON (p) - Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield (D.-Mont.), yesterday introduced another amend-
ment seeking withdrawal of U.S. forces from Indochina with-
in six months, and said he will press the issue "again and
again and again" until American involvement ends.
The amendment would declare as U.S. policy a with-
drawal of American forces within six months if U.S. prison-
ers of war are released.
Mansfield's original amendment was approved earlier by
the Senate, rejected by the House, and compromised in the
final version of the draft ex- --

in Denmark
econd from right) chats with Den-
arrived in Copenhagen last night
chorage, Alaska where he conferred
s Briefs.)

tension bill.
The version Congress approved
asks President Nixon to negotiate
a final date for U.S. withdrawal.
Republican Leader Hugh Scott,
(R-Pa.), said last week the new
amendment could be moot before
it is enacted because of Nixon's
own withdrawal program.
The new amendment, like the
first one, will be added to a bill
h ndl d by the Armpn 2d e noi

a ueu fy ue fri eu
committees of the House
ate, and it could again

N. Viets

srvices
and Sen-
run into

* * *
ISRAELI PREMIER GOLDA MEIR said yesterday in an inter-
view that the United States is undermining its own quest for a
Middle East peace by denying Israel deliveries of warplanes.
Meir contends that Egypt is likely to see this as ground for not
compromising in peace efforts. She said also that in a situation where:
Egypt is receiving continuous military aid from the Soviet Union, the
imbalance might encourage Cairo into a new battle against Israel.
A SPECIAL GREEK MILITARY COURT last night heard Lady
Amalia Fleming testify that she had assisted in a plot to free from
prison a would-lie assassin of the Greek premier.
Fleming, widow of the discoverer of penicillin, is charged along
with two Americans and a Greek, of associating to "form a gang" andk
"assist a prisoner to escape."c
The prisoner, Alexander Panagoulis, attempted the execution of
Premier George Papadopoulos in August, 1968, and was spared the
death sentence only after international appeals.
* n app* s
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT acknowledged yesterday over-
hearing on a so-called nationl security wiretap the voices of five
persons charged with conspiring to plant bombs in four cities.+
In papers filed with the District Court in Detroit, the government'
said that although the five "were never the subjects of direct elec-
tronic surveillance" they "did participate in conversations overheard,
by the federal government."
The five are among 13 members of the Weatherman organization
indicted by a federal grand jury in Detroit more than a year ago.

Ir 110 1110 o -114 110 o

House resistance and a deadlock
between the branches.

" I U I ' I V j t j ,ft $,' Sen. John Stennis, (D-Miss.),
chairman of the Armed Services
" ' Committee, said the withdrawal
amendment should be dealt with
eC nop wm se as a separate measure, not tacked
onto the big weapons - buying bill.

LONDON (AP') - British axAd
Irish prime ministers sought in'
three-way summit talks yester-.
day to head off the danger of
civil war in Ireland.
In day-long talks Britain's
Edward Heath led the search
for a politicaltruce between the
feuding leaders of the Irish re-
public and the Northern Ire-
land government, Jack Lynch
and Brian Faulkner.
There was no evidence of im-
mediate progress after the two-
day parley recessed for the night.
Heath, Lynch and Faulkner
are all under fierce political
pressures at home to yield little
or nothing to their challengers.
Nevertheless, .despite a news.
blackout, informants reported
one of Heath's starting points

was a moveto discover if a
process of compromise - Brit-
ain's short-term aim - would
follow any modification of Nor-
thern Ireland's system of intern-
ment without trial.
Internment, introduced early
in August, is at the center of
Northern Ireland's latest strife.
Faulkner insisted the system
was essential for the security
of the Protestant - ruled six
counties and that mainly kncwn
or suspected terrorists of the
outlawed Irish Republic Army
have been held.
His opponents contend it has
been used mainly on the basis
of political selectivity, with
members of the Roman Catho-
lic. minority as the chief vic-
tims,

But the House wouldn't even
have to consider a separate end-
the-war measure, and even if one
were passed in that fashion, it
would be subject to a Nixon veto.
Mansfield said as far as he is
concerned, the fate of prisoners
of war and missing Americans "at
this late date is the only signifi-
cant basis for this nation to re-
main any longer in Vietnam."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day throughSunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mall.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mall..

shell roads
to Saigon
SAIGON (P)-North Vietnamese
troops kept up heavy pressure for
a second day yesterday against
South Vietnamese forces guarding
the western and northern ap-
proaches to Saigon.
The attacks yesterday followed
two ground assaults in the region
Sunday and day-long bombard-
ment of rockets and mortars
against South Vietnamese posi-
tions.
The two-day surge of shellings
and ground attacks on both sides
of the Cambodian-South Vietna-
mese border took a rising toll of
South Vietnamese casualties and
claimed two U.S. aircraft support-
ing the Saigon troops.
One North Vietnamese objec-
tive appeared to be to open infil-
tration corridors into the heart-
land of South Vietnam.
U.S. officers speculated that
Hanoi also may have timed the
attacks, and an increase in sap-
per activity, to take advantage
of internal political turmoil in
South Vietnam.
The unrest stems from opposi-
tion to the one-man candidacy of
President Nguyen Van Thieu in
the presidential election next Sun-
day.

Kenward Elnisie
(1971 Winner of the O'Hara Award for Poetry)
Author of Book &
Lyrics of
"The Grass Harp"
x- .1 w ill b e p re se n te d
ina

MASS MEETING
for people interested in
Registering the Student Vote

i
i

Bowling Leagues Forming
LAST CALL!
Michigan Union Lanes
Open Noon Mon.-Sat., IP.M. Sun.

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, September 28, 12:00 Noon
U.M. INTERNATIONAL CENTER
Subject:
"Policy Dimensions of the Attica bicident"
Speoker: PROF. DAVID CHAMBER
Professor of Criminal Law, U of M

8:30 p.m.-Tonight

Anderson A & B
in the Union

sponsored by the Coalition to
Register the Student Vote

For Reservations
call 662-5529
Cost: 50c

Sponsored by: Ecumenical Campus
Center and
lnte,rnational Law Society

i

Special Poetry Reading

SEATS NOW!
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE, 10-1, 2-5

1

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

------ --- -

Sponsored by U /M Extension Service
and the Dept. of English

9"tf~iXa~~~l 5 Jealre Myw

Wed. &

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Sept. 29

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TODAY

4 P.M. UGLI
Multi-Purpose Room

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TIHE GALA INAUGURAL PRODUITION

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*SWEATERS 15c each
clean only

(60c min. charge)

DIAL 8-6416
STARTING WEDNESDAY

ENDS TONIGHT
"LITTLE CAESAR"
and
"PUBLIC ENEMY"

1

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master charge
T NE INTERBANK CARD

Nu-Rag Cleaners

POWER CENTER
.or aie ,e r/rinin /1r4

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WORLD PREMIERE

Il

in

BARBARA
COOK
RUTH FORD
WESLEY ADDY

CELESTE
HOLM
Utz

CAROL
BRICE
MAX SHOWALTER
RUSS THACKER

I

"THE GRASS HARP"
I ~ e ig Al#// .A/1 Mify(Ica

Book & Lyrics by KENWARD ELMSLIE
fI AID flIt A nnIk U

I s: .: t..!??t'.: F . $$.,: ... :#.r :. ..: : k x' ' ' 'ii' Sii > ti i':ii c.:i' g"' w_' ,. _,;ir

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