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September 26, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten
NEW FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 26, 1971

I

I

Dearborn gets

freshman class

(Continued from Page 1)
Despite its being an urban
University, supposedly geared to
the problems of the inner city,
only six per cent of the campus
is black or Spanish speaking.
Goodall hopes to be able to
attain 10 per cent black en-
rollment by 1973-74 - the goal
accepted by the Regents after
last year's Black Action Move-
ment strike at the Ann Arbor
campus.
In addition, an entirely new
curriculum has been developed
to accommodate the new stu-
dents - all of whom are par-

ticipating in a literary college
program. Dearborn has until
now primarily been an engi-
neering and business school.
The program's innovative na-
ture comes from a special work-
study cooperative program in
which students attend classes
one semester and have practical
work experience the next.
The newness of the program
allows faculty members much
latitude in which to move. En-
glish Prof.. Elton Higgs says the
faculty has tried to do "some-
thing not necessarily traditional
but rather some blend of the old

and the new to- give a fr'eshness
to the program."
Central to the freshman pro-
gram is the "Freshman ex-
ploratory" - designed to re-
place traditional first year En-
glish courses. Exploratory sec-
tions are small and based on
topics ranging from "Tragedy in
the Life of Man" to "Che Gue-

vara".
"The course
Higgs says, "so
dents can master
the same, time
something they
in."

is designed,"
that the stu-
writing and at
write about
are interested

Sororities work for new image

(Continued from Page 1)
the socially oriented, closely su-
pervised apolitical life of a sor-
ority is a thing of the past.
"Sure, sororities are changing
from what they were five years
ago," says Shannon. "They're
changing just as much as the
girls are."
Shannon explains that sorori-
ties are only about as socially
active as most coed dorms.
While dances and other spe-
cial events occur regularly,
they are not the focal point of
sorority life.
Instead, according to many
sbrority women, philanthropic
and even political activities take
up much of their time. Many
cited the work of their houses
which included setting up a
blood banks, working for abor-

tion reform, working with the
blind and the handicapped, and
organizing course mart courses.
. Most sorority women are
moderate to liberal politically,
says Mary Ann Dantzer of Al-
pha Xi Delta. Most seem to be
interested in political reform
only as far, as working within
the system."
"You'll find that freaky peo-
ple don't join sororities," she
observes.
In recent years, sororities have
also begun to liberalize their
regulations.
In most sororities actives are
not required to abide by any
particular dress code, Panhel
officers say, and visitation
hours are increasing.
Most sororities now allow men
in the women's rooms from 7 to

11 p.m. on weeknights, and have
a continuous open-open policy
from Friday evening to Sunday
evening. Although this is not as
liberal as most dormitories' 24-
hour open-open policy, Shannon
emphasizes that it represents an
improvement.
"We try to follow the lead of
the University in changing our
policies. A sorority can't survive
unless it follows general campus'
trends," she says.
The members say this modern-
ization makes sororities much
like University co-ops, except
for the "bond of sisterhood."
"I really can't explain it,"
says Elaine Friedenberg. "It's
much more than just the
house."
According to Carroll, it
means always being able to de-
pend on the people you live
with. "When you live in a soror-
ity, there's always somebody
there," she says.

But, while academic pursuits
are important, one of the
things freshmen feel must be
created is a "sense of commun-
ity" - a difficult achievement
in a school to which many stu-
dents commute.
With this in mind, students
who hope to live on campus
want new housing units built as
the present ones can only ac-
commodate 120 of the 1300 stu-
dents.
One admissions official hopes
that a basketball team can be
established to bring students
together outsidevofhthe class-
room and to "give them a sense
of identity and something to be
be proud of." Further, such a
move might prove useful to re-
cruiting minority students - a
task made difficult by the
image of Dearborn as a white,
middle-class suburb.
University- officials say they
expect the political attitudes on
the traditionally quiet campus
to change somewhat. "With the
introduction of 17 and 18 year
olds to a campus which has had
an average age of 26, there is a
perspective of youth on issues
that has never been here be-
fore," says Hessler.
Goodall hopesthat student
input can be obtained through
liaison committees which have
been set up for academic and
student affairs and facilities.
In coming years, Goodall says
he hopes to emphasize Dear-
born's role asan urban univer-
sity. "We have to concentrate
now on curriculum and meeting
the needs of minority students
and urban vocational needs,"
he says.
For the student body:
FLARES
by
A Levi
'A Farah
Wright
A Lee
-& Male

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
LYBILL 1971-72
ATRA . Oct. 20, 21, 22, 23 (Power Center)
T . - . Nov. 10, 11, 12, 13 (Trueblood)

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA. . . Dec.

1, 2, 3, 4 (Power Center)

I

26, 27, 28, 29 (Mendelssohn)

. Feb. 16,17,18, 19 (Mendelssohn)

Bicycle traffic increases

7
I
i
7
j
l

"There's somebody to laugh
(Continued from Page 1) shortage of bicycle parking spac- with, and there's somebody to
Councilman Robert Faber (D- es. listen if you're feeling really
2d ward), an avid cyclist who In an effort to deal with the low. I think that people grow
pedels himself to and from work problem, the city has recently or- to be closer to each other in
every day, says he is working on dered bicycle storage space be pro- sororities than anywhere else."
proposed legislation to provide for vided in off-street parking struc- -- - -
a bicycle lane on any future roads tures. TURKISH GIFTS
on the city. Cement bicycle racks have also
.- been installed along Main; South andQ
The effect of his measure is un- be ntle ln an ot
ear hhoweveroashemeast majsrnUniversity and State Streets. ILEATHIER SHOP
ity of the cities roads have al- Bicycles also create their own SALE, 20 % OFF
ready been built. peculiar legal problems. Police * Turkish Puzzle Ring
raybebut.officials warn that bicycle riders v C elTrks ete
Councilman James Stevenson will be ticketed for riding on the * Real Turkish Leather
(R-4th ward) cautions that be- wrong side of the street or down: *Coats, Jackets, Pants
fore proceeding with such a pro- one way streets the wrong way. " Handmade, Unusual
gram "we'll want to see how the Additionally, thefts of cycles Oriental Jewelryu
public responds to the initial set have skyrocketed, police officials c * Hand Embroidered
of bicycle routes." report, and owners are strongly Dou
If getting to and from places urged to lock their bikes and to .Dresses, Blouses, Socks
abard a cycle is a ro l secure licenses for them in order Turkish Rugs, Bags
is parking, to help the police identify the and Tapestry
owners of bikes they recover. " Real Turkish Towels,
Aside from the dificulty of se- "If they don't license t h e i r Bathrobes, etc. . ..
curity - police officials lament bikes they'll never see them again
that many bike locks can be sim- if they're stolen," says one offi- DON'T MISS IT...
802 S. STATE ST.
ply picked - there is also.a- grave cer. ( (Between Hill & Packard)
ilo ss m mm . ,. so me alaam ene SEPT. 28-OCT. 5 e
(eo<>o<--C>o<->o<-=>o<9
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.e s ..... gE I

March 29, 30, 31, April 1

(Power Center)

The Box Office at Trueblood Theatre will open for season subscription sales only on October 13, 14, 15.
The Box Office at Power Center will be open for season subscriptions and single sales October 18 to
23. Thereafter it will be open weeks of performance only at the theatre scheduled for each play.
Hours: Performance Days: 12:30-8:00; Otherwise: 12:30-5:00. Mail orders will be filled prior to the
opening of the Box Office.
PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS AND PREFERRED LOCATIONS)
Season Subscription: REGULAR: (Wed. and Thurs.)-$13.00, $8.00

4

CHECKMATE

WEEKEND:

(Fri. and Sat.)--$15.00, $10.00

MIXED: (weekdays and weekends mixed) -add 50c for each
Friday or Saturday ticket ordered to regular season
price above.

State Street at Liberty

INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: WED. and THURS.-$2.50,$1.50
FRI. and SAT.-$3.00, $2.00

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
Ecology Week: Walkathon, begins at
Farmers Market, 10 a.m.
School of Music: Karen Albers, organ.
Chapel of the Holy Trinity, Concordia
Lutheran College, 4:30 p.m.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
Environmental Health Seminar: A.
Jacobson, "Bioluminescence and Mecha-
ntsms of Radiation Effects," Aud., 2nd
n, Sch. of Pub. Health, 1 p.m.
Anatomy Seminar: W. Siebert, "De-
velopment of Instructional Goals," 4804
Med. Soi. II, 1:10 p.m.
Social Work Lecture: E. M. Goldberg,
London, England, "Evaluating Social
Work in Britain Today," 4064 Frieze
Bldg., 2 p.m.
SACUA: Dow Aud. Lounge, 2 p.m.
Senate Assembly: Dow Aud., 3:15 p.m.
Engineering Mechanics: W. F. Powers,
"Trajectory Optimization Techniques,"
325 W. Engin. Bldg., 4 p.m.
Physics Seminar: J. Vander Velde,
"Diffraction Dissociation of Neutrons
on Nuclei," P&A Colloq. Rm, 4 p.m.
General Notices,
Strdents planning to do Secondary
Student Teaching during Winter Term
(Jan.'72) must report to the Second-
ary Directed Teaching Ofc., Rm. 1360,1
SETS no later than Tues., Sept. 28, to
pick up nec. info. and materials and
should plan to attend one-hr. group
mtg .either at 4:30 p.m. or 7 p.m. on
Tues., Sept. 28 in Schorling Aud., SEB.
If you do not follow these instructions,
your application may be dropped from
Winter Term directed teaching prog.
Any student intending to drop or
U-M
RIDING CLUB
MASS ORGANIZATIONAL
MEETING
Mon., Sept. 27-7:30 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
ALL ABILITIES WELCOME
769-3364

change to a later term, should inform
that office (764-8402 or 764-8403).
Make-up final exam for German 101,
102 111, 231, 232, and 236 will be givens'
Mon., Sept. 7_.9 p.m.; students must
get written permission from previous
German instructor, or course dir., to
take make-up final, and sign up in Ger-
man Dept. offc., no later than noon,
Mon., Sept. 27.
PRESIDENT'S STATE OF THE UNI-
VERSITY ADDRESS. President Fleming
will give the annual address to the fac-
ulty and staff Mon. evening, Sept. 27,
8 p.m. in Rackham LectureHall; meet-
ing will be open to all members of E
University community; the five Dis-
tinguished Faculty A c h i evem ent
Awards, six Distinguished Services
Awards for Instructors Assistant Pro-
fessors, and Junior Associate Professors,
and the University Press Boom; Award
for 1971 will be presented; reception
will be held in Michigan League Ball-
room immediately following the mtg.
For the student body:
A Genuine
3 Authentic
A Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 50l

1. l outiqrue

NOTE: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 rows of balcony.
ALL PERFORMANCES AT 8:00 P.M. SHARP! LATECOMERS WILL BE SEATED AT THE CONVENIENCE OF THE AUDIENCE.
NO REFUNDS. EXCHANGES, WHEN POSSIBLE, UNTIL 4 P.M. DAY OF PERFORMANCE.

P.anJ,

iO pi

and

Cn
" Ardee
" Match II
" Quote me
" Tiffany
Manor
. Levi's
" Plushbottom
and Peabody
" Stringbeans

TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE: 764-5387

POWER CENTER BOX OFFICE: 663-3333

#1

" w'wrrr. rswrwrwrwwwwrwwwrwwwwwwrwmr w Uwww~w inwrrrw rrwmrwrrrrraw

SEASON SUBSCRIPTION Q
Weekend Q
Regular
Mixed L
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS Q
Prefer Orchestra Q

..STATE
-ZIP

Balcony L

Faculty LI

Student Q

Ann Arbor QI

Q Visitor

Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat.

No. Price

i

Office Use

GODOT

SI I I

CHECKMATE

II

1' ' 1

iI

State Street at Liberty

TOTAL (Season Price or Individual Tickets) __(for mixed season add 50c for each

11

Come over to 707 Oxford Road
Tuesday, September 28
7-10 P.M.

Aaie6l

CHECK ONE: I enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope. Please mail my tickets in September.
I enclose no envelope. Hold my tickets at the Box Office. I will pick them up.

0

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MAIL ORDERS TO: UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

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