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September 26, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

1

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sunday, September 26, 1971

hews briefs
By The Associated Press

U.S. planes continue strikes on

N.

Vietnam bases for fifth day

rtieM 482 -3300 !
u FREE LIGHTED
PARKING
REMARKABLE ! A STUNNING
VISUAL RECREATION !
-New York
"A MASTERWORK OF POWER AND
BEAUTY!A remarkable achievement!"
-Cue Magazine
"Stunning, "A MASTERPIECE!"
Richly Romantic!" -McCall's
-Playboy
"EXTRAORDINARILY BEAUTIFUL!"
-Rex Reed
THE CELEBRATED STORY OF A MAN OBSESSED
BY IDEAL BEAUTY.

VICE PRESIDENT Nguyen Cao Ky and top opposition lead-
ers met yesterday night apparently to map new election protest
strategy following a day of ineffectual anti-government demon-
strations in South Vietnam's capital.
Ky said the meeting was "just a gathering of friends . .. discuss-
ing the problems of the country," but the presence of major oppo-
sition groups indicated that anti-Thieu strategy was the main sub-
ject of discussion.
COMMUNIST PARTY CHAIRMAN Mao Tse-Tung of theI
People's Republic of China "is in good health and the situation
in Peking is normal", according to a Japanese newsman in China,
reported a Tokyo newspaper today.
In Hong Kong, a newspaper quoted a traveler arriving there from
China as saying a purge of political opponents of Premier Chou{
En-lai was under way.
The Japanese report on Mao's health and the situation in Peking
was published by Yomiuri Shimbun, a nationally. circulated news-J
paper, following numerous reports that something important was;
happening there. Mao's health and a possible purge have been
frequent subjects of the speculation.
* * *
THE NEW YORK State Corrections Department said yesterday
that another Attica Correctional Facility inmate died at a
Buffalo hospital, bringing the death toll from the convict upris-
ing to 42.
The department identified the latest victim as Edward Menefi, 20,
adjudged a youthful offender and sentenced in 1969. The exact cause
of his death was not given, pending an autopsy. However, a spokes-
man said he assumed that Menefi died of gunshot wounds.
PRESIDENT NIXON flew to the Northwest yesterday to pro-
mote a maritime strike settlement and abolish authority for World
War-type detention camps in a gesture he linked with an historic
meeting in Anchorage, Alaska today with Emperor Hirohito of
Japan.

-Associated Press

Justice Hugo Black

IBlack's burial set for Tuesday
in capital with simple honors

Nixon
of a 1950
thousands,

announced that he had signed a bill abolishing provisions
law that authorized detention camps of the type used for,
of Japanese-Americans in World War IL

WINNER GRAND PRIX CANNES 25th ANNIVERSARY AWARD
WARNER BROS PRESE-l - S A FIL Y BY rI C '
DrA OGRE .LT- , ! E u N/I ANDRESEN
Sr~ILVANA MANGMO H/icoCJ~ / MYiSCONTt BADMLUCCO
MUS 1BY GUST ~4ER "/l DRECTED BY UCNu 0VISCONTIlSOIAT GOROON D
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER - *AMOGkW / FROM WARNER BROS. A RNNEY LEISURE $ERY" GP]
ALI NO VSCN1

In a statement, Nixon said that the mere existence of legal
authority for detention centers had stirred concern among rpany
Americans that someday it might be used to apprehend and detain1
citizens holding unpopular views.
"I have supported and signed this repeal," Nixon said, "in order toI
put an end to such suspicions . . . There is no place in American life
for the kind of anxiety-however unwarranted-which the Emergency
Detention Act has evidently engendered."
Later; after meeting with representatives of the striking Inter-
national Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union and the Pacific
Maritime Association, the employer group, Nixon announced that they
had agreed to try to reach settlement by the end of next week.
The strike began July 1, shutting down 24 ports on the West:
Coast from San Diego, Calif., to Seattle, Wash., idling more than 150
ships and causing cargo losses estimated in the millions.
* *
SEN. ROBERT P. GRIFFIN has asked the Justice Depart-
ment to intervene in the Pontiac controversy, convinced that
school integration by busing is "counterproductive."
"Instead of helping in the effort to promote better race rela-
tions", Griffin said in a statement Friday, school busing "is re-
sulting in more bitterness and more polarization."

WASHINGTON (RP) - Fcrm-
er Supreme Court Justice Hugo
L. Black, whose belief that the
Constitution meant what it said*
led him to landmark defense of
individual freedom, will be buried
here Tuesday with simple hon-
ors.
Black died early Saturday, lit-
tle more than a week after he
retired following 34 yeas on
the high court. His retirement
prompted a national outpouring
of praise for a legal carear that
found its bedrock in the Bill of
Rights.
A spokesman at Bethesda.
Naval Hospital said the 85-year-
old jurist died at 1 a.m. of the
effects of a stroke and inflama-
tion of the arteries.
He will be buried at 3 p.m.
at Arlington National Cemetery,
an hour after services at Wash-
ington Cathedral.
Black's death came while a
longtime colleague, and fre-
qumt opponent, on the h i g h
bench lay in grave condition at
another Washington hospital.
Justice John M. Harlan, a lead-
er of the court's conservatives,
retired a few days after Black,

and it was disclosed that he is
suffering from cancer.
The Clay County, Ala., shop-
keeper's son had been a country
lawyer, a member of ,tne Ku
Klux Klan, a county prosecutor,
New Deal senator and a shaper
of American Law.
He carried with him a thumb-
worn copy of the Constitution
and an unshakable belief that
the Founding Fathers under-
stood the English language, that
they meant what they said.
"No law means no law." Black
said with simplicity in describ-
ing his position that the First
Amendment guarantees of free-
dom of the press, religion and
speech were absolute.
Perhaps Black's most famous
decision involved banning gov-
ernment-sponsored prayer in
the schools. "It is no part of the
business of government to com-
pose official prayers for a n y
group of the American people to
recite," he said.
Most recently he made clear
his position in concurring with
the -majority to allow publica-
tion of the Pentagon Papers.
He found some of his col-
leagues, ready to hold that the

general provisions of the ori-
ginal Constitution somehow
overshadowed the later, speci-
fic language of the Sill of
Rights.
"I can imagine no greater
perversion of history," B 1 a c k
declared.
President Nixon found that
Black brought to the court "a
mind that was brilliant and a
characterthat was earnest and
strong." Chief Justice Warren E.
Burger said Black's death "re-
moves from the scene one of the
authentic legal philosophers of
our time."
The man Nixon called "this
noble American" was born Feb.
27, 1886, the youngest of a family
of eight. He earned his law de-
gree in 1906 and began to im-
press those with influence. After
World War I service, he return-
ed to prosper in private practice
in Birmingham.
He joined the Klan in 1923
and quit it in 1925 to make his
successful campaign for the Sen-
ate where he supported much
of the New Deal legislation pro-
posed by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt.

SAIGON D - American
fighter-bombers struck for a
fifth straight day in N o r t h
Vietnam yesterday w h i le
Communist forces stepped up
shelling attacks in S o u t h
Vetnam.
The allied commands. report-
ed 13 rocket and mortar barrages
against U.S. and South Vietnam-,
ese units and bases, including
shellings of two air bases and a
South Vietnamese task force
headquarters at Da Nang.
The air strike in North Viet-
nam hit two anti-aircraft sites
near the Mu Gia Pass, a mountain
gateway 75 miles north of t h e
Demilitarized Zone, the U.S. Com-
mand said. North Vietnam fun-
nels men and war supplies through
the pass into the Ho Chi Minh
trail in eastern Laos for South
Vietnam and Cambodia.
The U.S. "protective reaction"
strike capped five cosecutive
days of American raids in North
Vietnam that began Tuesday with
a massive 200 bombing sorties Int
the southern panhandle, many oft
them aimed at fuel depots.
It was the 64th "protective re,
action" raid so far this year over
North Vietnam. These strikes are
made when U.S. planes are alleg-
edly fired upon or threatened with
hostile action.
In the North, the mounting air
action stemmed from increased
U.S. air strikes aginst the Ho Chi
Minh trail, resulting in greater
anti-aircraft fire. The U.S. effort
is aimed at wrecking the trail and
mountain passes leading into it be-
fore the dry season arrives in
about two weeks. That is when
Hanoi begins its annual push of
supplies and men southward.
In South Vietnam, the U.S.
Command reported an American
helicopter was shot down 27 miles
southeast of the Khe Sanh near
the Laos border. Ground fight-
ing once more added up to iso-
lated skirmishes around the coun-
try.
The helicopter downing raised
to 7,958 the announced total of
U.S. aircraft of all types lost to
all causes, combat and mechani-
cal, in the Indochina war since
the start of 1961.
In another development, the
U.S. Navy turned over to t h e
South Vietnamese navy 15 more
vessels. The Navy said the turn-
over raised to nearly 900 the num-
her of vessels given to the South
Vietnamese since November 1968,
the start of the Vietnamization
program.
-ICE-
a future-fantasy of revo-
lutionary struggle within
the U.S. made by revolu-
nary filmmakers.
sex and violence
.U..and vision
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
Sept. 28 & 29
ARM/Michigan Film Society
DIAL 8-6416
SHOED~
REVIEWERS
HAD THIS
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A TMN JEUE A LIBERTY
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SUNDAY 2:15 e 4:30
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Griffin also suggested that the U.S. Supreme
come another chance "to clarify the law".

Court would wel-

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