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September 25, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-25

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 25, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, September 25, 1971

Big
By BILL ALTERMAN
Back in the good olde days
of the thirties and forties the
Big Ten was THE football con-
ference. Year after year they
would have the nation's number
one ranked team. They were
the class of the country.
But, alas, the times they are
a changing and the Big Ten of
late has been showing the con-
sequences of their tighter re-
quirements and ' restrictions.
Last week a new height in fu-
tility was reached as only two
of the teams could win out of
the nine nonconference games
played.
This week will bring little so-
lace to many of the losers as
once again is appears the Big
Ten will take a shellacking
from out-of-conference foes.
Such national powers at Notre
Dame, Louisiana State, South-
ern California, Colorado, Syra-
cuse and UCLA will be out to
make things rough for Big Ten
teams.
Michigan, which takes on
tough UCLA, is not the only
conference power with their
hands full today. Ohio State,
which breezed 52 - 21 in their
opener against, Iowa two weeks

ren

teams

fa

Big Ten Standings

Conference Games

All Games

wV
MICHIGAN 10
Ohio State 10
Minnesota 10
Michigan State 10
Wisconsin 00
Purdue 00
Indiana 01
Northwestern 01
Iowa 01
Illinois 01
TODAY'S
UCLA at MICHIGAN
Colorado at Ohio State
Northwestern at Syracuse
Louisiana State at Wisconsin
Penn State at Iowa '
ago, must take on Colorado to-
day. Woody Hayes has appar-
ently dug up another good team
but the Buffalos are no slouch-
es. Against Wyoming last week
they smashed their way to an
impressive 56-13 win. The game
is in Columbus though, and the'

L
0
0
0
0
0
0
r
1
1
1

T PF PA W L T
0 21 6 2 0 0
0 52 21 1 0 0
0 28 0 1 1 0
0 10 0 1 1 0
0 0 0 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 1 0
0 0 28 1 1 0
0 6 21 0 2 0
0 21 52 0 2 0
0 0 10 0 2 0
GAMES
Notre Dame at Purdue

PF
77
52
35
10
51
35
26
13
40
0

PA
6
21
35
10
20
38
36
71
85
37

CRAIG CURRY (10) seems to be having his troubles in last
year's game against Michigan. The Minnesota quarterback should
have an easier time of it today as the Gophers take on impotent
Washington State.
Subscribe to
U-M The Michigan Daily

RIDING CLUB
MASS ORGANIZATIONAL
MEETING
Mon., Sept. 27-7:30 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
ALL ABILITIES ,WELCOME
769-3364

BILLIARDS,
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBALL
UNION

The Ally-R33EN Maynard
PRESENTS

Gri~dde Pickings,
The State of California is full of . . . People. It is also full of
something else, smog. So, of course, a logical choice for guest selector
would be Mr. Robert L. Chase, Los Angeles County Air Pollution Con-
trol Office.'
This is the job that goes ior the most part, unmentioned. (The
smog too is quite unmentionable.) He tries hard as number two.
What's first? The smog, of course.
"How is the pollution in the 4ir there in LA?"
"Pretty Athin."' (Whether this reference is to the pollution or the
air is unknown.)
"Actually how is the weather in sunny California?"I
"Sunny when we can see it. How about Ann Arbor?"
"Well, we've had a lot of rain lately."
"Shhhhhh! Not so loud! No one in LA likes to hear about that.
It's almost become . .. obscene."
''Why? What's so bad about some nice refreshing rain?''
"Why!? Because it doesn't exist here. Why some children are
being raised not knowing the beauty of a summer shower that isn't
covered with film. Most kids think the smog is coming down. Some
even believe an oil slick to be smog on the surface."
But we did get Mr. Chase to choose the winners of our games.
The choices are ,in boldface which is the big letters in journalism
lingo (which is language in journalism lingo).
1. UCLA at Michigan (.27-24) 11. OKLAHOMA at Pittsburgh
2. Illinois at USC 12. NAVY at Boston College
3. OREGON STATE at MSU 13. IOWA STATE at New Mexico
4. INDIANA at Baylor 14. ALABAMA at Florida
5. Iowa at PENN STATE 15. AUBURN at Tennessee
6. Washington State at 16. MISSISSIPPI STATE at
MINNESOTA Vanderbilt
7. SYRACUSE at Northwestern 17'. Texas Tech at TEXAS
8. COLORADO at Ohio State 18. COLORADO STATE at Idaho
9. NOTRE DAME at Purdue 19. Oregon at STANFORD
10. LSU at Wisconsin 20. Olivet at HEIDELBERG
- - - - -- - - - - -

Indiana at Baylor
Illinois at Southern Cal
Washington State at Minnesota
Oregon State at Michigan State
big bad Bucks have not lost
there since 1967.
Syracuse tied up Wisconsin
last week, 20-20, and today
would like to really go to work
on a demoralized Northwestern
team. The Wildcats have lost
two in a row and last 'week's
trouncing by Notre Dame may
have really taken the fight out
of them.
Number two ranked Notre
Dame tore into Northwestern
last week and today they will
sink their long fangs into Pur-
due. The Boilermakers have
beaten the Irish four times in
the last ten years but that was
mostly in the days of Bob Griese
and Mike Phipps. Though Pur-
due's offense put on a tremen-
dous show against Washington
last week, Notre Dame's defense
willpresent a much tougher
problem..
Wisconsin managed to come
away with a tie in last week's
contest with Syracuse but they
may not be so lucky today.
Their opponent, Louisiana
State, clobbered Texas A&M
and seemed to have regained
the form that led them to a
9-3 record last year. LSU also
has the distinction of being one
of the few teams in the na-
tion that actually touts a de-
fensive player for the Heis-
man Trophy. This, of course, is
Tommy Casanova, a defensive
cornerback who occasionally
gets put on offense.
Hapless Illinois will continue
their feeble ways today as they
will more than likely get blown
out of the stadium by tough
Southern California. The Illini
have yet to score a point this
season and John McKay's boys
may keep it that way.
Another conference floosy,
Iowa, will also find the going
not so great today as perennial
power Penn State battles them

ce long
on regional tv. Hawkeye coach
Frank Lauterbur is well on his
way to being the Denny McLain
of college football. While Lau-
terbur was with Toledo the Roc-
kets won 23 games in a row.
Today will probably be number
three going the other way for
poor Frank.
One club which expects to
have it a little easier this week
is Minnesota. The Gophers got
stomped by number one ranked
Nebraska last week but didn't
look as bad as the 35-7 score
might indicate. Their opponent
today, Washington State is
winless to date and quarterback
Craig Curry should lead the Go-
phers to victdry number two. 5
Another biggie pits Indiana
against Baylor. Indiana knock-
ed off Kentucky last week and
could repeat today as they take
on none too tough Baylor. Nei-
ther team is going anywhere v
this year but ,they do have the
satisfaction of playing at night
in muggy Waco, Texas.
And finally, Michigan State,
which has averaged five points
in its first two games, takes on
Oregon State. OSU beat up
Iowa last week and could do
it again today.
Before the season began ev-
erybody was saying how great
MSU would be and so far their '>.
defense has been superb. Alas,
their offense hasn't gone any-
where and Coach Duffy Daugh-
erty has been franctically /...
changing his lineup in order to
find a workable combination. If.. ?.
he doesn't find it soon it may
be goodbye Duffy shortly.
If nothing else, the Big Ten
today has home town advant-
age - for whatever that's
worth. Eight of today's ten
contests are being played on NORT
Big- Ten turf with only Illinois his foo
and Indiana forced out of their stompi
local abode.
It won't help. slightly

*i

.1

4

HWESTERN'S BARRY PEARSON seems to have gotten
ot caught in an unidentified Michigan object. The Wildcats,
ed by Notre Dame last week, will find the going only
y easier today as they must face tough Syracuse.

Saturday

FRIDAY,
24

SATURDAY,
25

SUNDAY,
26

VOLS CONFRONT TIGERS:
SEC shootout set today

MISSISSIPPI FRED McDOWELL
and TERRY TATE
Fri., Sat.: 2 Shows 7:30-10:00
Sunday: 1 Show 8:30
r TICKETS ALL SHOWS $2.00j
No one wanted the blues master to leave the stage but he had to give
way to the other artists. "They have to be heard. You know they got
a right," Mississippi Fred McDowel explained. And anyone who had
seen the Arhoolie Records artist's set should consider themselves
lucky, for they had been treated to a blues giant who had lived it
a lifetime and played it for the better part of three decades.
He accompanied his vocals with Stelia, a Gibson electric guitar,
slightly amplified, and Jim Tutunjian on Fender bass. The set was
pure blues, smooth. and clean, as McDowell allowed his fingers to
float across Stella's frets augmenting a strong vocal blues style which
McDowell could truly call his own. "My Babe," "Baby Please Don't
Go," "Good Morn' Lil' Schoolgirl," and "You Got to Move," had
everyone foot stomping and drifting at the same time. The man
has lived his music.
Also appearing was Tom Everett, RCA Records artist. Everett, playing
a 12-string guitar and accompanied by a three-man back-up, ran
through several pop country tunes from his new LP, "Porchlight On
In Oregon," "Excitation Revire," "Theresa," and "Bad Dreams," fea-
tured a good vocal effort on Everett's part and a very tight group.
But Everett does not have the total control of his voice as yet. His
style, somewhat akin to Roy Orbison's vocal style, really showed when
he sang Orbison's "It's Over." Everett sits on the threshold of a fine
career, and his group is more than adequate. There will be more
heard from this RCA artist in the future,
BOB GLASSENBERG
Billboard Magazine
Sept. 4, 1971
COMING:
Oct. 1, 2, 3-Arthur Bigboy Crudup
And Johnny Shines
ADVANCE TICKETS at Salvation Records, Pinball Alley in the
Basement-ADMISSION ALWAYS FREE

By JIM EPSTEIN
Southern gentlemen will take a
threethour break from theirbusy
schedules all over the South today
to watch their televisions and lis-
ten to the dulcet tones of Chris
Schenkel and Bud Wilkinson de-
scribe the action as two of the
three powers in the Southeastern
Conference clash in the game that
could decide the SEC champion-
ship.
The combatants, Auburn and
Tennessee, have had a series the
last few years which rivals the

--

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meetings between Michigan and
Ohio State. Last season's meeting
ended in -a 36-23 victory for the
Tigers and was the only blemish
on Tennessee's 1970 record.
The visiting Volunteers jumped
out to a 10-0 lead, but blundered
the ball over to Pat Sullivan and
the Auburn squad time and again
and Sullivan guided the Tigers to
the comeback win.
Auburn finished the season at
8-2 and with Sullivan and split end
Terry Beasley returning for their
senior years, the Tigers are a good
bet to improve.
The Vols, 11-1 in 1970, blame
Auburn for preventing them from
getting the national championship
they thought was rightfully theirs.
Tennessee is currently working on
an 11 game winning streak, with
last year's loss to Auburn being
the only one coach Bill Battle has'
suffered.-
Tennessee's Neyland Stadium,
where a crowd of over 65,000 is
expected for today's game, holds
some unpleasant memories for
Sullivan. Two years ago Sully, the
nation's total offense leader at the
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time, was intercepted five times
by the Volunteer defense in a total
collapse of the Auburn attack en
route to a 45-19 loss.
Auburn relies upon what they call
a "fast field" offense which is a
wide open style, best suited for a
dry field. The Tigers employ a
spread formation designed to free
their wide receivers one on one.
Beasley, along with Sullivan, is the
key to the maneuver.
Beasley's credentials include 52
catches and an average gain of
20.2 yards per reception in 1970.
Coach Ralph (Shug) Jordan uses
the spread formation with the idea
that should the defense choose to
double cover Beasley, the other
'wide man will have only one man
within striking distance once he
catches the ball.
Tennessee has been experiencing
quarterback troubles since the
graduation of Bobby Scott .last
year. Dennis Chadwick, a senior,
was one of three signal callers
used by Battle in last week's open-
er against California - Santa Bar-
bara. There is little doubt about
Chadwick's running skill, but his
passing ability is open to"wide-
spread doubt.
Curt Watson, a pre-season fa-
vorite for all-SEC recognition keys
an overpowering Tennessee run-
ning attack from his fullback spot.
Chadwick saw limited action in
the Vols easy win last week, but
he did pick up 71 yards in 9 car-
ries, or almost 8 yards a try.
The Volunteer defense is an-
chored by what is generally con-
ceded to be the best set of line-
backers in the conference. All-
America Jackie Walker holds down
one spot, while Ray Nettles and
Jamie Rotella fill out the corps.
The Auburn coaching staff feels
that Tennessee will have to control
the ball to beat them. They feel
that if the Tiger defense can force
the Vols out of their grinding
ground attack and into a passing
game, it would be tantamount to
victory.
So, while Tennessee will concen-
trate on stopping Auburn's passing
game, the Tigers will have to con-
tain the Vols' running. And, in all
probability, the least successful
team can forget about an SEC
championship in 1971.

i

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