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September 24, 1971 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-24

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday; September 24, 1971

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday; September 24, 1 971

STUDENTS, WORKERS:

Mixed crowd meets Nixon

By ALAN LENHOFF
Special To The Daily
DETROIT - As some of Mich-
igan's most affluent persons sat
inside Cobo Hall last night listen-
ing to President Nixon, a tense
crowd of about 4,000 workers, stu-
dents, Vietnam veterans, and sen-
ior citizens marched and chanted
slogans as cordons of police stood
by in full riot gear. .
Particularly w e 11 represented
were members of the AFL-CIO-
which had endorsed the protest.
Some union members, proudly
wearing the same hard hats that

had been a symbol of suppor't for
the administration only a year
ago, carried signs denouncing the
administration's economic policy
and demanding regulation of cor-
porate profits.
"We all know that lots of people
here are protesting the war," said
one construction worker, "but our
union really isn't in total agree-
ment about that. All we know is
that the American economy is be-
ing ruined by the administration."
Also present last night were
members of Detroit's militant Ho-
tel and Restaurant Workers Local

Nixon talks in Detroit

(Continud from Page 1)
est influence on the rest of the
economy.
"But there is no limit on the
duration," he went on, speaking
of the second phase, "because its
duration should depend on how
effectively it deals .with the prob-
lems."
Nixon said his price-wage curb
has the support of the American
people, but noted that it will also
be necessary "to have government
sanctions to back it up-which
there will be."
The President also told club-
members that there was a danger
of pollution controls becoming so
expensive that in consequence jobs
would have to be cut back.
"But," he said, "we are not
going to allow the environmental
issue to destroy the industrial sys-
tem that made this nation the
great country that it is."
"I have been in countries that
have no industrialization. I have
been in countries that have very
Court denies
Sinclair bond
LANSING () - The State Su-
preme Court yesterday denied
John Sinclair, former White
Panther Party leader, release on
bond pending ahearing on his ap-
peal of his 9%/2-10 year sentence
for possession of two marijuana
cigarettes.
The court ordered, however,
that briefs for the appeal be sub-
mitted promptly. Oral arguments
have been scheduled -for Novem-
ber.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 24
Day CalendarI
Commission on Women: 3540 SAB,
3-5 pm.
Astronomy Colloquium: G. Elste, "As-
tronomical Microturbulence," P&A Col-
loq. Rm, 4 pm.
Committee of Concerned Asian Schol-
ars: Discussion with Ann and Ul-
dis Kruze, People's Republic of China,
plus film and slides, Nat. Sci. Aud.,
and Rm. 200, Lane Hall, 8 pm.
Macedonian Folk Dance Workshop
A Kolarovski, Biarbour Gym. 8-11 pm
General Notices
History Make-Up Exam: Will be held
Sat., Sept. 25,. 9-11 am., 429 Mason Hall;
consult your instructor, then sign list
in History Ofc, 3601 Haven Hall.
Environmental Health Seminar: A.P.
Jacobson, "Bioluminescence and Mecha-
nisms of Radiation Effects," Mon., Sept.
27, Sch. of Public Health II, 1st Fl.
Aud., 1 pm.
Applications for 1972-73 Fubright-
Hays Scholarships must be completed
and filed at 1014 Rackham Bldg., by
Oct. 11.
Placement Service
There are still a number of appoint-
ments available for recruiters coming
next week; they include: Univ. of Santa
Clara Law School, Mich. State Police,
Henry Ford Hosp. (looking for sci-
ences & M.H.A.), New York Life In-
surance, and Defense Supply Agency.
Call today for appt. 763-1363.
Interview bulletin for week of Oct.
4-8 available in our office for inter-
ested students.
Organization Notices
E-ology Center & ENACT - Sept 24
-Community Picnic - 5:03 PM at the
North Campus Organic Gardens -
Bring your own picnic.
a I)

RALEIGH BIKES DO NOT CAUSE
CANCER, SMOKE ONE TODAY.
(Contains no Cycle-mates)
Carlton, Raleigh, Turin, Bertin,
Triumph, Holdworth, Witcomb,
Bob Jackson, Pogliaghi.j
Touring and Racing ports and
accessories. Complete repair fa-
cilities for all Racing and Tour-
ing bicycles.
TIRIN1

few automobiles, and let me say
that I would rather live in the
U n i t e d States of. America," he
said. The audience roared its ap-
proval.
Nixon disclosed that the pos-
sibility of controlling i n t e r e s t
rates, "particularly with regard to
loans to consumers," is being con-
sidered but no decision has been
made.
In addition, Nixon told his
questioners in the automotive cap-
ital the reported disturbances in
mainland China will not change
his plans to visit that country.
His travel plans "will be an-
nounced at an appropriate time,"
he said.
"What I am trying to do is
simply to open a dialogue and
move toward normal relations,"'
Nixon said, "so that differences
will not continue to exist between
our two countries-so that we talk
about them and not fight about
them, now or fifteen years from
now."
When asked about the crisis in
the nation's cities, and in partic-
ular in Detroit, Nixon stressed
that local efforts, not action from
Washington, were the ultimateM
solutions to the problems.
As with welfare reform, the
President placed the blame for the
delay in his revenue sharing pro-
gram on Congress.
Claiming the support of "over
70 per cent of the population" for
his revenue sharing proposal Nixon
warned, "It's time for Congress
to reflect what the country feels."
On the issue of profit con-
trols, Nixon reiterated his pre-
viously stated position of opposi-
tion.
"It is only through profits that
industry can buy the new plant,
the new equipment that will make
our workers more productive and
therefore more competitive in the
world," he said.
"Putting is quite bluntly, let me
say that I am for profits, be-
cause I believe that more profits
mean more jobs. At this particular
time we need more jobs," the
President concluded.

705, some of whom dressed in black
suits with the names of Nixon and
some of his key economic advisers
written on the backs as they stood
over a coffin labeled "the Ameri-
can economy."
One lone demonstrator, a recent
immigrant from Cuba, was pro-
testing the protest.
"They should not protest, they
should welcome the President be-
cause this is a great country and
he is a great man," he declared.
Another man, peddling plastic
American flags, complained that
business was bad.
When asked if he might be do-
ing better if he moved to where
the limousines were still unload-
ing, he replied, "No thanks, I
think the demonstrators should
want to carry the flag too."
Some were angry, like one young
black man who offered a challenge
to the President.
"Let him come outside. Let him
show his face. He should be out
here where the good, decent peo-
ple are. He is gonna be lucky if
he gets out of Michigan alive," he
shouted.
Another youth, wearing a swa-
stika armband, said he "just came
to see what it was like-to see all
the degenerates walking around."
His companion, dressed in an
army uniform, affirmed his re-
spect for the President. "He is the
Commander-in-chief you know. If
he came out here now and gave
me an order, I'd have to obey it."
"You see those Vietnam veterans
with te Viet Cong flag?" he an-
grily asked. "I saw the clowns.
They were probably half high all
the time they were there. They
just hide instead of fight."
Eco-freaks to
walky Sunday
Winding up Ecology Week will
be a walk around the city, or
"Walkathon" to raise funds for
the Ann Arbor Ecology Center.
The "Walkathon" will begin at
10 a.m. this Sunday at the Farm-
er's Market.
Each walker will solicit sponsors
to pay them at a given rate per
mile. Interested persons may call
761-3186.
Rent your
Roommate with

4,000 march
to protest
Attica, ails
(Continued from Page 1)
Wayne Community College stu-
dent Lonnie Peek urged blacks to
combat the "inhuman conditions
in therWayne County Jail, politi-
cal repression of black community
leaders and the economic depriva-
tion and exploitation of black and
poor people."
Peek condemned the "brutal
killings" by STRESS members last
Friday of two black teenagers, al-
legedly fleeing after an attempted
robbery.
STRESS, an acronym for
"Stop the robberies, enjoy safe
streets," has been the subject of a
spreading controversy in the De-
trait community.
Under the STRESS program,
plain clothes officers act as de-
coys to lure criminals who may be
looking for victims.
Since January, STRESS offic-
ers have killed ten people, nine of
them blacks, in what some black
community leaders describes as
unnecessary killings.
On Tuesday, the president of
Michigan's black police associa-
tion, the Guardians, said that
black officers "are not going to
stand for" the killings of black
Detroiters by members of the
STRESS unit.
Guardian President Thomas
Moss said the killings of Ricardo3
Buck, 15, and Craig Mitchell, 16,
were unnecessary because the "im-
mediate danger" to the officer al-
legedly robbed, had ceased when
the youths begin to flee.
The march yesterday called by
the State of Emergency Commit-
tee, was the largest by Detroit
blacks since Martin Luther King
led 100.000 demonstrators down
Woodward Ave. in June, 1963.
A panel of three judges ruled
last May that conditions in the
jail constituted "cruel and unusual
punishment" and ordered drastic,
reformation of jail conditions.
However, the attorneys who won
that case charged in August there
has been no improvement in the
quality of inmate medical care
since the lawsuit.
GREGORY PECK in
MOBY DICK
Academy Awards winner
by JOHN HUSTON
it's about this whale."
TUES.-Sept. 28
aud. a--angell hall-75c
7 & 9:30 p.m.
ann arbor film cooperative

A

U

U

0

Message

the

Elected

Democrats

in

1City

Hall

I

I

fromll

I

DEAR STUDENT:

Welcome to Ann Arbor. We hope you will register to vote here,
since this is the unit of local government which taxes you and since
it is Ann Arbor's services-police, parks, planning, parking, etc.-
which directly affect you. Whether these services get better or worse
depends on your involvement.
This is a traditionally Republican, conservative city, which in the
memory of livingresidents, never h a d a Democratic majority on
City Council until the upset election of April 1969. The next year
Republicans won 4 of the 5 Council contests. While we Democrats
rallied in 1971, we are still a 5-6 minority in City Hall at present.
(There are 10 Councilmen, 5 elected each year by wards; the May-

I.

or, elected at large, votes at Council meetings.
terms.)

All serve two-year

With your help, in April

1972, we hope to regain majority status.

Your help is also needed to win such city-wide elections as are nec-
essary to make local taxes fairer and to be able to finance crucial
programs. Presently, city services are being cut back further each
year for lack of money.

41

The Ann

Arbor Democratic Party is more liberal than the Demo-

i

a Classified

Ad

j

:' ::{':::.'

i

WOMEN

cratic Party on the county, state, and national levels. We have
stood, and do stand, for immediate withdrawal from Vietnam, for
protection of the civil liberties of all residents, for significantly
more subsidized low-income housing; for mass transportation, for
environment protection, and for programs that will correct past in-
justices to minorities andto women. Within the constraints impos-
ed on us by the city financial situation and the various laws limit-
ing the city's power, we are working to r e a c h these goals in Ann
Arbor.
We built the first public housing in the city and were the first to put
the city in the bus business in a significant way. We have tightened
the housing code and passed landmark legislation concerning civil
rights and environment. We passed a city ordinance making poses-
sion and use of marijuana punishable by a maximum of 90 days in
jail, in an effort to induce change in state law which permits long
prison sentences for these offenses.
Now that the recent Supreme Court decision has struck down the
special rules restricting student voting, we hope you will register
and vote in this city and participate actively in the Ann Arbor
Democratic Party. If you join with the non-student liberals in this
city, together we will have the votes to improve our community.
Your decision -to get involved in local politics or not-has im-
mense importance to Ann Arbor and to yourselves.

I

GO TO

LAW SCHOOL

Sign up today to take the Law School Admis-
sions Test (LSAT).

Deadline for the Oct.

16 test

I

C

is Friday, Sept. 24
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE AT JR./SR. COUNSELING
AND 3RD FLOOR HUTCHINS HALL, LAW SCHOOL
Time for Another of our All-Campus,
(Moderately) Hi-Class
T.G.'s I
Featuring
RAGAMOPPYN
At
Theta Chii
Friday, Sept. 24--8:30
1351 Washtenaw

0
'
M
M
hf..

4

WE NEED YOUR HELP.

0

Sincerely yours,

ROBERT J. HARRIS
Mayor
JOHN P. KIRSCHT
Councilman, First Ward
NORRIS J. THOMAS
Councilman, First Ward
ROBERT G. FABER
Councilman, Second Ward
NELSON K. MEADE
Councilman, Third Ward

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I

I

SEEKING COMFORT,
FRIENDS AND ACTIVITIES
IN YOUR CAMPUS
LIVING SITUATION?
LOOK AT FRATERNITIES
AS AN ALTERNATIVE

I

SPECIAL REGISTRATION HOURS

Fri., Sept. 24, and
Mon., Sept. 27-Fri., Oct.
3 p.m.-8 p.m.at the

1

Mon., Sept. 27-Fri., Oct.
11 a.m.-3 pm..

1

A . . . . r. f \ .

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