100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Co. 4 Q

CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
PICNIC
DATE: Sept. 26 (SUN.)
TIME: 10:00 a.m.
Meet at International Center
For Information & Reservation
CALL 769-7476

Afl= tP t*gFtn

a 14

Ann Arbor, CMicignnFriday, September 24, 1971

page three

ALFRED SUSSMAN
ASSOCIATE (FORMERLY ACTING) DEAN, LSA
SPEAKS ON
"ESTABLISHMENTARIANISM"
FOLLOWING LOX and BAGELS BRUNCH
Sun., Sept. 2611:30 A.M. 75c
HILLEL-1429 Hill

news brie fs
By The Associated Press
MARSHAL LON NOL, Cambodia's semi-invalid prime minis-
ter, fired the nation's first vice premier and superminister of the
interior, In Tam yesterday for alleged incompetence.
The move may bring on a government crisis.
In Tam's sudden removal from the government was believed a
result of factional rivalries. Rumors of an impending reshuffle of
the government had been circulating for several days as criticism of
the administration's alleged shortcomings, particularly in the field
of economics, surfaced in the press.
In addition to leaving the vice premier post, In Tam also must
relinquish his rank as a brigadier general in the Cambodian army.
* * *
SUDANESE LEADER Jaafar el Numairi has charged the
Soviet Union with masterminding both the abortive coup against
him in July and a plot against President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
two months earlier.
Numairi's charges, his most direct against Russia since the July
coup, were made in a speech at East Gereif, near Khartoum, Sept. 10.
The speech, part of his campaign in Sudan's current presidential
referendum, went unreported by any of the Arab news agencies. His
remarks have only now become known, through diplomatic sources.
Former Egyptian Vice President Ali Sabry and 11 other former_
ministers and top political leaders are on trial in Cairo for their lives,
accused of plotting to overthrow President Sadat.
Maj. Hashem Atta, who staged the coup against Numairi. was !

Sen.

S .

Viet

McGovern

protest

charges plot in

WASHINGTON uR) - Sen. George McGovern charged yes-
terday that rioters who stoned and firebombed him in Saigon
last week included members of South Vietnam's civil defense
forces hired and paid by President Nguyen Van Thieu's gov-
ernment.
The South Dakota Democrat leveled the charge at a news
conference called to report on his 11-day trip to Paris, Saigon
and Tokyo.
In Saigon, there was no immediate comment from Thieu's
government. The day after the incident, the mayor of Saigon
said most of the demonstrat-1-

ors were members of the gov-
ernment-organized People's
Self-Defense Force. He a 1 s o
said Viet Cong agents were at
the meeting with McGovern
In making the charge that the
Thieu government was behind th
riot which erupted during his
meeting in a Saigon church, Mc.
Govern said members of the group
with which he was conferring were
able to identify some of the riot-
ers.

t
:.
e
e
I

-Associated Press

r
P
0
t?
Boats are booming! Bold and

Sen. George McGovern

MONEY MARKETS:

DEX
.. .1Black
- . Brown
4 A...
$27.00
CA USBOOTERY
304 S. STATE ST.

.'W- v W -,--a -waHe noted that Saigon's police
executed by firing squad. "chief. who he said is about to
A Soviet propaganda campaign against the summary execu- ,, na t OA f fjO TJ marry Thieu's daughter, announc-
tion of Atta and several other conspirators resulted in Numairi's ed the next day that the c i v i l
recalling Sudan's ambassador from Moscow. defense force members "W e r e
P I serving patriotically in breaking
ause a r to POup a meeting yith VietConis
THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) re- cadres" and other pro-Communist
quested lawsuits yesterday against 30 industries and threatened to elements. McGovern said t h a t
seek action against five others. LONDON (') - The dollar negotiate usefully on the world the charge was false.
dropped sharply in value on most monetary system. He added that Gen. Duong Van
The thirty cited to the Justice Department were among those of the world's big exchange mar- Foreign ministers of the Euro- Minh, one of two presidential
that failed to apply for permits to discharge wastes into U.S. navig- kets yesterday in heavy trading. pean Common Market nations candidates who withdrew from the
able waters, despite a grace period of more than two months since the The decline was attributed to un- made these same accusations in a 1 Oct. 3 election charging Thieu had
legal deadline last July 1,.1 confirmed reports that a lead- meeting in Brussels on Monday. rigged it, told him "there was not
The main purpose said EPA Counsel John Quarles was to put ing world monetary body, the In- Pompidou began the news con- the slightest doubt" the rioters
The main urpoesd t EPA CounselsJohn Quared wat g ternational Monetary F u n d ference with a detailed analysis of were paid by the government in
these companies and others on notice that EPA is tired of waiting MF), is proposing a dollar de the monetary crisis. Nixon's meas- an effort to embarrass McGovern.
and is ready to start suing. Additional lawsuits may be filed as valuation of 3 to 5 per cent. ures to suspend the gold convert- In the Senate, meanwhile, Mc-
adequate evidence is collected. The Nixon administration has ibility of the dollar and apply a f Govern lost in a move to require
h been resisting devaluation, hoping 10 per cent surtax on imports have ! President Nixon to give Congress,
PRICES on most of American Motors' 1972 cars were in- that an upward i'evaluation of troubled France and other U.S. along with next year's regular de-
creased up to $72 per car yesterday. other currencies would solve the trading partners. Pompidou said. fpnse budget, an alternative bud-
AMC meanwhile shuffled the equipment which is available as world monetary crisis. "The international monetary sys- get limited to $60 billion - nearly
sAndardmornoptilesu nlethevariuscars.wThedollarhitvaiecortem is in ruins." $20 billion below this year's.
Hstandard or optional items in the various cars. The dollar hit a record low in He said the European Common The vote was 58 to 26 against
AMC insisted it had received no approval from the federal gov- West Germany. It also declined in Market countries must "Maintain the amendment, which also would
Britain, Switzerland and Japan. a common front against the out- have required the administration
eminent for any increases in base prices of the 1972 cars and the jOl aiaogErp' ed
government's Cost of Living Council agreed. Only Paris, among Europe's lead- side world-a united front which to develop plans for conversion
ing exchanges, recorded an im- will have a great weight the day of defense industries to civilian
A spokesman for the government's Cost of Living Council said provement in the dollar. The that a settlement comes." pursuits.
in Washington the government is not permitting price increases for IMF is reportedly suggesting the -
American Motors automobiles, but only allowing the company to devaluation of the dollar as part
mark up prices for equipment that was optional a year ago but Of a general realignment of ma-
4^,n~rni i .,NAG oP idr;J P halt to

Allies alert
to election
incidents
SAIGON (1P) - The govern-
ment of President Nguyen Van
Thieu said yesterday in a radio
and television broadcast that the
Oct. 3 presidential election will
be held as scheduled despite
mounting opposition.
American and South Vietnamese
forces were ordered on special
alert yesterday to meet the threat
of increasing enemy attacks aimed
at disrupting the election.
An association of retired South
Vietnamese generals joined the
growing resistance to Thieu's un-
opposed candidacy yesterday, call-
ing on him to resign and let the
National Assembly organize new
elections.
Anti - government factions in
Saigon and other major cities in-
dicated there would be more dem-
onstrations against Thieu and the
election within the next few days
-probably tomorrow.
For the 215,000 U.S. service-
men, the alert appeared designed
to keep them clear of terrorist at-
tacks and political strife such as
the anti-government street dem-
onstrations and anti-American
fire bombings of the past two
weeks.
Meanwhile, there was evidence
of mounting shellings; terror and
sapper attacks by North Vietna-
mese and Viet Cong units.
The U. S. Command disclosed
that many of the 200 bombing
strikes inside North Vietnam
Tuesday were against fuel depots
in the southern panhandle.
Earlier announcements had in-
dicated the raids were primarily
against missile and anti-aircraft
positions that were threatening
U. S. plhanes attacking targets in
Laos.
Just before and during the
South Vietnamese lower house
elections Aug. 29, there was a
sharp increase in enemy attacks
and terrorism.
At that time, U.S. and South
Vietnamese troops also went on
an alert similar to the one order-
ed to start today and run at least
to Oct. 6.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

now is standard equipment.
NATIONAL WELFARE COSTS skyrocketed a record 27 per
cent in the fiscal year ending last June 30 the government said
yesterday.
This boost occurred despite a shrinking of relief rolls in the past
two months.
The department of Health Education and Welfare said state, local
and federal expenditures for all forms of public assistance, including
medical aid and welfare, increased $3.4 billion to $16.3 billion over
the year. The total is almost double the $8.9 billion four years ago.
Paradoxically, a downturn toward the end of the record 1970-71
welfare year may signal the beginning of a period of public assistance
austerity.
In June eleven states cut welfare eligibility and payments forc-
ing relief rolls down for the second consecutive month. The 14.3 mil-
lion welfare recipients in June were 22,000 fewer than in May.

jur currencies.
The IMF, based in Washing-
ton, is an organization of 117
nations that seeks to promote
monetary cooperation and ex-
change stability throughout the
world.
It is meeting in Washington this
weekend to talk over the crisis
touched off by President Nixon's
economic austerity program an-
nounced Aug. 15. Some IMF pro-
posals to restabilize the monetaryI
system have been submitted to
member governments for study.I
President Georges Pompidou of
France claimed in a news confer-
ence in Paris that the United
States acted illegally to protect
the dollar. He said it is refusing to

1 \ l c .A1nsUiA e 11111, L
Pontiac busing boycott

I
j
i
I

DETROIT oP) - The National'
Action Group (NAG) is expected
to announce that it is calling off
its boycott of Pontiac, Mich.,
schools.
NAG attorney L. Brooks Pat-
terson and the group's spokesman,
Irene McCabe, called a press con-
ference to make the announce-
ment Wednesday.

release at their afternoon press
conference, NAG officials s a i d
they wanted to take "a positive
approach."
One such "positive" approach
would be the formation of a team
of monitors, made up of black
and white parents, who would ride
school buses and go into the Pontiac
schools to tabulate reports of al-

I
j
i
i
l
t
,r
E

v

I I I

BIVOUAC
ARMY-NAVY SURPLUS

TODAY'S BEST SINGERS
TODAY'S GREATEST SONGS
FROM COLUMIBIA

Patterson said Wednesday night leged violence which are "not be-
NAG feels it has proven its point ing reported by the school board,"
but that the boycott has reached according to attorney Patterson.
a "point of diminishing return." NAG apparently has hopes of
Continuing the action, he add- becoming a national force oppos-
ed, would only hurt the Pontiac ing court-ordered busing of school;
school system "to the tune of $1 children.
million," under the Michigan state McCabe has made several out-
aid to education formula, based on of-state trips and announced Wed-
school attendance Oct. 1st. nesday that former Florida Gov.
NAG officials have said that is Claude Kirk, who is attempting
the amount a continued boycott to set up a national anti-busing
would cost Pontiac schools. lobby, will be in Pontiac Sunday
The NAG attorney said the anti- to address a NAG rally.
busing organization predicted a -_-_________ ------
backlash. "People are going to:
think we ran from a fight," he:
added.
NAG also called off its pro-
posed Oct. 1st statewide school DIAL 8-6416
boycott.S
In a statement prepared f o r

Air Force Parkas
P-Coats
Field Jackets

Used Khaki Shirts
13-Button Wool Bells
Officer Coats

Used Jeans
514 E. WILLIAM
(above Campus Bike)
PHONE: 761-6207

'i

HOURS: 11-5

PHONE: 761vy-6207

--

REVIEWERS
HAD THIS
TO SAY!

I

L

76GU

DE

ANYTIME, ANYDAY, for ANYTHING
INFORMATION CENTER MANNED WEEKDAYS IN THE UNION LOBBY

ANDY WILLIAMS

JOHNNY MATHIS
"You'Ve Got a Friend"

"You've

Got a Friend"

on sale at

3.59

on sale at

2.99

including "For All We Know," "A including
Song for You," "If," "How Can Only HaN
You Mend a Broken Heart," "I'll Read MyI
Be There," and six more Out," and
OVER 25,000 LP'S, OVER 300 LABELS IN STOCK
m WATCHF OR SeCIALA cALE

"It's Too Late," "If We
ve Love," "If You Could
Mind," "We Can Work It
seven more

"QUESTIONS?"
" Current Events and Activities
" Black Information & Events
764-8131
" Check out a rumor
" Where to go to take care of
something on campus or
in town
" Recreation Areas
" Who to talk to about something
" Find available services on
campus or in the Ann Arbor

"HASSLED"
" Red Tape?
" Legal
" Drug-
" Draft
* Academic
" Problem Pregna
* Money
" Girl/Boy
relationships
* Religious
" Housing

"WANT TO TALK?"
" Sound out a few ideas with
someone
" Talk to a person instead of
4 walls
" Try a new perspective on
something
ncy 0 Get a response
* To a black counselor
* * Want company on the phone
for awhile

"
"

Unload something heavy
Exchange opinions and thoughts

II

U I

II

I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan