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September 22, 1971 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-22

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Page Eight-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday., September 22, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Wednesday, September 22, 1 971

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STUDY OF CONFLICT
College offers new peace major

40

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NEW YORK (P)-Teach peace,
not war. That's the theory be-
hind a new and unusual major
being offered undergraduates at
Manhattan College.
The program, believed to be
the first in the country at an
undergraduate level, includes
eight courses from various aca-
demic disciplines and a seminar.
A spokesman for the Roman
Catholic college said the idea of
a peace major stemmed from
the Pacem in Terris Institute.
a n extracurricular program
founded in 1963 by a group of
Manhattan teachers. The insti-
tute took its name from the en-
cyclical issued by the late Pope
John XXIII and meaning Peace
on Earth.
"Their founding principle,"
said the school spokesman, "was
that peace could be taught.
They referred to other things
that are taught-including war
and military tactics. Peace is a
valid academic discipline."
Interest in the institute and
its convocations and lectures led
to the establishment five years
ago of a peace course and, this
fall, a full-fledged peace major.
Dr. Tom Stonier, director of
the program, said eight juniors
have begun peace majors. En-
rollment in individual peace
courses offered as electives
ranges from 20 to 150, he said.
Why a peace major? "The

outstanding social problem of
our time is intergroup conflicts,"
said Stonier. "We see it in many
parts of the globe. We feel that
the students who must be to-
morrow's leaders are not getting
an adequate education on this
point, that someone must ad-
dress themselves systematically
to the problem."
The peace major is interdis-
ciplinary, meaning courses come
from different departments -
history, biology, literature, reli-
gious studies, psychology, econ-
omy and government. Students
majoring in peace must take all
eight courses-29 credits-plus
the seminar over a two-year
period.
S p e c i f i c courses include
world economic geography-re-
lating the geography of a coun-
try to its policies of aggression
or nonaggression; anatomy of
peace-a review of "war limit-
ing or peace maintaining sys-
tems": peace and revolution-
peaceful means of revolutionary
change within the framework
of Christian theology; the lit-
erture of peace and war; and
the biology of human behavior,
Stonier said the developers of
the program hope the peace
graduates will enter a variety
of fields, particularly teaching
and businesses that involve in-
tergroup conflicts,

Peace research did not suc-
ceed here at the University. The
controversial Center for Re-
search on Conflict Resolution
closed this summer, for what
President Robben Fleming call-
ed financial reasons. Psychology
Prof. Robert Hefner, the center
director, claimed it was closed
because of its "radical" reputa-
tion.
SGC to l
e Mp_.ty seat
A Student Government Council
committee is interviewing stu-
dents to fill the vacant seat left
by Paul Teich, '71, who graduated
from the University in May.
Teich's term runs until' Decem-
ber. The committee is accepting
applicants at the SGC office, 3rd
floor of the Union, and will sub-,
mit a list of names to Council.
From this list, Council will ap-
point the new member at their
Sept. 30 meeting.
Petitions set for
t ort10o reform
T h e Michigan Coordinating
Committee for Abortion Law Re-
form has begun a campaign to ob-
tain 250,000 signatures to put'the
question of abortion law reform
before state voters in 1972.
Petitions will be available for
signature by registered voters at
The Union from today until Fri-.
day from 2-3, p.m. and next week
Monday through Friday, also from
2-3 p.m.
American Association
of
University Women
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